Pain Patate

Though the name literally means “sweet potato bread,” this Haitian treat is more like a baked pudding. The secret is to use white sweet potatoes (also called boniatas) and not orange ones or yams. Otherwise, the dish will look rather unappetizing though it will taste good.

Ingredients:

Servings: 8 – 10

Units: US | Metric

  • 2 lbs white sweet potatoes
  • 1 large banana, peeled and cut in one-inch pieces
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisin
  • 1 teaspoon grated gingerroot
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 ounces evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • rind of one lemon, grated
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Grate sweet potatoes into mixing bowl and mash the banana into the sweet potatoes.
  3. Mix in all ingredients, one at a time, until each ingredient is fully blended into the mix.
  4. Spread evenly into a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  5. Bake for 90 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean.
  6. Let cool 10 minutes. Serve hot. For an added treat, top with whipped cream or rum syrup.

Review:  I couldn’t find white sweet potatoes, so I used regular ones, and it was fine. My husband said it looked and tasted just like what his sister used to make (and sell!) in Haiti. The only change I made was to use lime rind instead of lemon since limes are much more common in Haitian cooking than lemons.

Courtesy of Valeria and 5-Star FoodieThough the name literally means “sweet potato bread,” this Haitian treat is more like a baked pudding. The secret is to use white sweet potatoes (also called boniatas) and not orange ones or yams. Otherwise, the dish will look rather unappetizing though it will taste good.

Though the name literally means “sweet potato bread,” this Haitian treat is more like a baked pudding. The secret is to use white sweet potatoes (also called boniatas) and not orange ones or yams. Otherwise, the dish will look rather unappetizing though it will taste good.

Though the name literally means “sweet potato bread,” this Haitian treat is more like a baked pudding. The secret is to use white sweet potatoes (also called boniatas) and not orange ones or yams. Otherwise, the dish will look rather unappetizing though it will taste good.

 

Ingredients:

Servings: 8 – 10

Units: US | Metric

  • 2 lbs white sweet potatoes
  • 1 large banana, peeled and cut in one-inch pieces
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisin
  • 1 teaspoon grated gingerroot
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 ounces evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • rind of one lemon, grated
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Grate sweet potatoes into mixing bowl and mash the banana into the sweet potatoes.
  3. Mix in all ingredients, one at a time, until each ingredient is fully blended into the mix.
  4. Spread evenly into a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  5. Bake for 90 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean.
  6. Let cool 10 minutes. Serve hot. For an added treat, top with whipped cream or rum syrup.

Review:  I couldn’t find white sweet potatoes, so I used regular ones, and it was fine. My husband said it looked and tasted just like what his sister used to make (and sell!) in Haiti. The only change I made was to use lime rind instead of lemon since limes are much more common in Haitian cooking than lemons.

Courtesy of Valeria and 5-Star Foodie

 

 

Ingredients:

Servings: 8 – 10

Units: US | Metric

  • 2 lbs white sweet potatoes
  • 1 large banana, peeled and cut in one-inch pieces
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisin
  • 1 teaspoon grated gingerroot
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 ounces evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • rind of one lemon, grated
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Grate sweet potatoes into mixing bowl and mash the banana into the sweet potatoes.
  3. Mix in all ingredients, one at a time, until each ingredient is fully blended into the mix.
  4. Spread evenly into a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  5. Bake for 90 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean.
  6. Let cool 10 minutes. Serve hot. For an added treat, top with whipped cream or rum syrup.

Review:  I couldn’t find white sweet potatoes, so I used regular ones, and it was fine. My husband said it looked and tasted just like what his sister used to make (and sell!) in Haiti. The only change I made was to use lime rind instead of lemon since limes are much more common in Haitian cooking than lemons.

Courtesy of Valeria and 5-Star Foodie

 

 

Ingredients:

Servings: 8 – 10

Units: US | Metric

  • 2 lbs white sweet potatoes
  • 1 large banana, peeled and cut in one-inch pieces
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisin
  • 1 teaspoon grated gingerroot
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 ounces evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • rind of one lemon, grated
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Grate sweet potatoes into mixing bowl and mash the banana into the sweet potatoes.
  3. Mix in all ingredients, one at a time, until each ingredient is fully blended into the mix.
  4. Spread evenly into a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  5. Bake for 90 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean.
  6. Let cool 10 minutes. Serve hot. For an added treat, top with whipped cream or rum syrup.

Review:  I couldn’t find white sweet potatoes, so I used regular ones, and it was fine. My husband said it looked and tasted just like what his sister used to make (and sell!) in Haiti. The only change I made was to use lime rind instead of lemon since limes are much more common in Haitian cooking than lemons.

Courtesy of Valeria and 5-Star Foodie

 

Dady Chery

About Dady Chery

Dr. Dady Chery is a Haitian-born journalist, playwright, essayist, and poet. She is the author of "We Have Dared to Be Free: Haiti's Struggle Against Occupation." Her broad interests encompass science, culture, and human rights. She writes extensively about Haiti and world issues such as climate change and social justice. Her many contributions to Haitian news include the first proposal that Haiti’s cholera had been imported by the UN, and the first story describing Haiti’s mineral wealth.

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