Floods Cause Colombia Landslides, Deadly Pipeline Explosion

 

Floods, landslides paralyze Colombia’s holiday high season

By Tim Hinchliffe
Colombia Reports

As Colombia’s holiday high season begins, many of the country’s roads are impassable due to landslides, flooding and embankment collapses.

The country’s Highway Patrol has reported that there are six primary roads, 20 secondary and 278 tertiary with total closures.

Carlos Rosado Zuñiga, director of the National Roads Institute (INVIAS), told newspaper El Espectador that the country has a big problem with roads, but staff have been making concessions to allow millions of Colombians to mobilize.

The strained road infrastructure has led to a decrease in hotel bookings and a scarcity in airplane tickets.

The bad state of Colombia’s road infrastructure is particularly hitting the coffee region, because the road between the capital Bogota and the city of Armenia is closed. Also Cartagena, Colombia’s most famous Caribbean tourism destination, only has a hotel occupancy rate of 40%.

Public holidays in Colombia began Thursday and will last until the second week of January.

 

Source: Colombia Reports

 

 

Central Colombia fuel blast toll rises to 13

By Adriaan Alsema
Colombia Reports

Rescue workers in the central Colombian town of Dosquebradas said late Friday [December 23] that 13 people have been confirmed dead and 17 were in critical condition after the explosion of an oil pipeline caused a fireball and a blaze.

The last confirmed was a six-year old girl found dead in the rubble of destroyed homes by rescue workers.

According to newspaper El Espectador, 17 people are in critical condition, while over 80 others are less seriously injured.

Several authorities have said the early-morning explosion was probably caused by an oil thief causing a spark when drilling a hole in the pipe to steal fuel. However, Mining and Energy Minister Mauricio cardenas told newspaper El Tiempo that heavy rains and subsequent landslides caused a rupture in the pipeline.

State-owned oil company Ecopetrol, responsible for the pipeline, said in a statement it would assume all medical costs of the victims.

President Juan Manuel Santos confirmed that victims would be compensated and added that the authorities would assume full responsibility for rebuilding approximately 40 homes that were destroyed by the explosion and fire.

 

Source: Colombia Reports

 

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Floods, landslides paralyze Colombia’s holiday high season

By Tim Hinchliffe
Colombia Reports

As Colombia’s holiday high season begins, many of the country’s roads are impassable due to landslides, flooding and embankment collapses.

The country’s Highway Patrol has reported that there are six primary roads, 20 secondary and 278 tertiary with total closures.

Carlos Rosado Zuñiga, director of the National Roads Institute (INVIAS), told newspaper El Espectador that the country has a big problem with roads, but staff have been making concessions to allow millions of Colombians to mobilize.

The strained road infrastructure has led to a decrease in hotel bookings and a scarcity in airplane tickets.

The bad state of Colombia’s road infrastructure is particularly hitting the coffee region, because the road between the capital Bogota and the city of Armenia is closed. Also Cartagena, Colombia’s most famous Caribbean tourism destination, only has a hotel occupancy rate of 40%.

Public holidays in Colombia began Thursday and will last until the second week of January.

 

Source: Colombia Reports

 

Floods, landslides paralyze Colombia’s holiday high season

By Tim Hinchliffe
Colombia Reports

As Colombia’s holiday high season begins, many of the country’s roads are impassable due to landslides, flooding and embankment collapses.

The country’s Highway Patrol has reported that there are six primary roads, 20 secondary and 278 tertiary with total closures.

Carlos Rosado Zuñiga, director of the National Roads Institute (INVIAS), told newspaper El Espectador that the country has a big problem with roads, but staff have been making concessions to allow millions of Colombians to mobilize.

The strained road infrastructure has led to a decrease in hotel bookings and a scarcity in airplane tickets.

The bad state of Colombia’s road infrastructure is particularly hitting the coffee region, because the road between the capital Bogota and the city of Armenia is closed. Also Cartagena, Colombia’s most famous Caribbean tourism destination, only has a hotel occupancy rate of 40%.

Public holidays in Colombia began Thursday and will last until the second week of January.

 

Source: Colombia Reports

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