Poland Government: We Were Wrong, We Will Not Ratify ACTA

acta_e_sm

 

Polish government asks European Parliament not to sign ACTA

Editorial note. ACTA is in its death throes, and the lethal blow came from young Europeans determined to keep their freedom of speech, with Poland leading the chage. Yes, “No rent-a-cop…, stand a chance against a resolutely uncooperative populace.” Congratulations to all those who organized on short notice and went out in the cold to protest against this stealth draconian law! It’s carnival time! After the party, let us all make sure ACTA never returns in any form. DC

Protester "cool guy" wears Guy Fawkes mask at anti-ACTA demonstration (Photo: Reuters/David W. Cerny).

 

PM Tusk has admitted he was wrong to support the treaty

By Alice Trudelle
Warsaw Business Journal

On Friday, Prime Minister Donald Tusk completed the about-face his government had started on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

Donald Tusk (Courtesy of Flickr/KPRM).

“I sent a letter today to all the party leaders who cooperate with the Civic Platform and the Polish People’s Party in the European People’s Party, including prime ministers, the [German] chancellor, presidents of some countries and the leadership of the European People’s Party, with a proposal to reject ACTA in the shape that was negotiated by the European Commission,”

Mr Tusk told a news conference Friday evening.

The PM admitted that the position prepared by Polish officials on ACTA over the last few months was

“reckless.”

“I was wrong. … It would be a sin to maintain a mistaken belief … the agreement does not correspond to the reality of the 21st century. The battle for the right to property should also respect the right to freedom.”

On January 26, the European Commission and 22 EU countries – including Poland – signed the deal, joining Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US. But ACTA also needs to be ratified by the European Parliament and by each of the 27 EU member states in order to be implemented in the EU.

 

Source: Warsaw Business Journal

 

Slovenian government leans towards freezing ACTA

By Staff
The Slovenia Times

The government is leaning towards freezing the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Minister for Education, Science, Culture and Sport Žiga Turk told the press coming out of a government session.

“We do not see a practical need for Slovenia to ratify it in this very moment,” Turk told the press.

He noted that the matter had only been discussed informally, and that the final announcement would be made by Economic Development and Technology Minister Radovan Žerjav.

The Economic Development Ministry said Žerjav would speak about ACTA at Friday’s public presentation of opinions, which has been organised by the parliamentary EU Affairs Committee.

The debate will coincide with the second protest against ACTA (the first one was held two weeks ago), organised by online activists.

According to the initiator of the protest, Gregor Plemenko, the operation undertaken by hacker collective Anonymous to push the government to freeze the ratification of ACTA was still under way, despite a drop of activity from last weekend, when the group brought multiple websites down.

Meanwhile the editors of the E-demokracija.si portal said that Turk’s statement was nothing but an effort to downplay tomorrow’s debate.

They noted that the freezing of ACTA was not enough, as the agreement should be rejected completely and the opportunity to discuss a better regulation of the internet seized.

The agreement was signed on 26 January in Tokyo by representatives of the European Commission and 22 of the 27 EU member states, including Slovenia.

The signing provoked outrage around Europe and several countries have already halted ratification procedures, among them Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

The accord is designed to protect copyright and crack down on online piracy, but critics say it will lead to intrusive surveillance and censorship.

 

Sources: Warsaw Business Journal | The Slovenia Times | Haiti Chery (editorial comment, photos)

 

Background on ACTA:
Massive Worldwide Anti-ACTA Protests
ACTA Ratification Suspended in Poland
ACTA Not Yet International Law | French MEP Quits in Protest
Block Thursday Jan 26th EU Ratification of Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA

 

 

 

Polish government asks European Parliament not to sign ACTA

Editorial note. ACTA is in its death throes, and the lethal blow came from young Europeans determined to keep their freedom of speech, with Poland leading the chage. Yes, “No rent-a-cop…, stand a chance against a resolutely uncooperative populace.” Congratulations to all those who organized on short notice and went out in the cold to protest against this stealth draconian law! It’s carnival time! DC

Protester "cool guy" wears Guy Fawkes mask at anti-ACTA demonstration (Photo: Reuters/David W. Cerny).

 

PM Tusk has admitted he was wrong to support the treaty

By Alice Trudelle
Warsaw Business Journal

On Friday, Prime Minister Donald Tusk completed the about-face his government had started on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

Donald Tusk (Courtesy of Flickr/KPRM).

“I sent a letter today to all the party leaders who cooperate with the Civic Platform and the Polish People’s Party in the European People’s Party, including prime ministers, the [German] chancellor, presidents of some countries and the leadership of the European People’s Party, with a proposal to reject ACTA in the shape that was negotiated by the European Commission,”

Mr Tusk told a news conference Friday evening.

The PM admitted that the position prepared by Polish officials on ACTA over the last few months was

“reckless.”

“I was wrong. … It would be a sin to maintain a mistaken belief … the agreement does not correspond to the reality of the 21st century. The battle for the right to property should also respect the right to freedom.”

On January 26, the European Commission and 22 EU countries – including Poland – signed the deal, joining Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US. But ACTA also needs to be ratified by the European Parliament and by each of the 27 EU member states in order to be implemented in the EU.

 

Source: Warsaw Business Journal

 

Slovenian government leans towards freezing ACTA

By Staff
The Slovenia Times

The government is leaning towards freezing the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Minister for Education, Science, Culture and Sport Žiga Turk told the press coming out of a government session.

“We do not see a practical need for Slovenia to ratify it in this very moment,” Turk told the press.

He noted that the matter had only been discussed informally, and that the final announcement would be made by Economic Development and Technology Minister Radovan Žerjav.

The Economic Development Ministry said Žerjav would speak about ACTA at Friday’s public presentation of opinions, which has been organised by the parliamentary EU Affairs Committee.

The debate will coincide with the second protest against ACTA (the first one was held two weeks ago), organised by online activists.

According to the initiator of the protest, Gregor Plemenko, the operation undertaken by hacker collective Anonymous to push the government to freeze the ratification of ACTA was still under way, despite a drop of activity from last weekend, when the group brought multiple websites down.

Meanwhile the editors of the E-demokracija.si portal said that Turk’s statement was nothing but an effort to downplay tomorrow’s debate.

They noted that the freezing of ACTA was not enough, as the agreement should be rejected completely and the opportunity to discuss a better regulation of the internet seized.

The agreement was signed on 26 January in Tokyo by representatives of the European Commission and 22 of the 27 EU member states, including Slovenia.

The signing provoked outrage around Europe and several countries have already halted ratification procedures, among them Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

The accord is designed to protect copyright and crack down on online piracy, but critics say it will lead to intrusive surveillance and censorship.

 

Sources: Warsaw Business Journal | The Slovenia Times | Haiti Chery (editorial comment, photos)

 

Background on ACTA:
Massive Worldwide Anti-ACTA Protests
ACTA Ratification Suspended in Poland
ACTA Not Yet International Law | French MEP Quits in Protest
Block Thursday Jan 26th EU Ratification of Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA

 

 

US sites hacked as objections grow to piracy deal

Raphael Satter and Vanessa Gera
AP via Brisbane Times

Opponents of a controversial global copyright treaty counted three victories Friday as American government websites were hacked and the Eastern European nations of Poland and Slovenia distanced themselves from the deal.

Sites belonging to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Consumer Protection Week were vandalized by Anonymous, a loose collection of cyber rebels who have helped lead the charge against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA.

The hackers replaced the sites with profanity-laced statements and a violent German-language video satirizing the treaty.

At the same time, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk said Friday the country was abandoning plans to ratify the deal. He said he now sees his earlier support for ACTA as a mistake.

“I was wrong,”

he said at a news conference.

His announcement came after Slovenia’s government also said Friday that it is halting the ratification of ACTA.

“This agreement is obviously not a matter of understanding, but of major misunderstanding,”

Slovenian Education Minister Radovan Zerjav said.

The developments are bad news for industrialized countries such as the United States, which have pushed ACTA as a way of defending the entertainment industry and luxury goods manufacturers from pirates and counterfeiters. American officials spent years negotiating ACTA in an effort to harmonize intellectual property protection across different countries.

The goal is to help countries fight everything from fake pharmaceuticals to pirated music, but grass-roots activists — many of them in Eastern Europe — have been waging weeks of protests against what they see as moves intended to clamp down on free expression and Internet privacy.

So far around 20 countries have signed up to the deal, a key step before ratification. Four EU countries have now backed away from it — Poland, Slovenia, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic — and its approval at the European Union level appears increasingly uncertain.

Tusk also said Friday that he sent a letter to the European People’s Party, a center-right group in the European Parliament to which his Civic Platform belongs, urging it not to back ACTA in its current form.

Back in the United States, the Trade Commission confirmed that the sites had been compromised, saying in an email that they had been taken down and wouldn’t be brought back

“until we’re satisfied that any vulnerability has been addressed.”

Anonymous boasted of stealing a large amount of personal data from Trade Commission employees — including everything from banking statements to dating website information.

The Trade Commission said that while it was still investigating the hack,

“the nature of the site limits information that could have been accessed.”

 

 

Gera reported from Warsaw. Associated Press writer Ali Zerdin contributed to this report from Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Source: AP via Brisbane Times

 

 

US sites hacked as objections grow to piracy deal

Raphael Satter and Vanessa Gera
AP via Brisbane Times

Opponents of a controversial global copyright treaty counted three victories Friday as American government websites were hacked and the Eastern European nations of Poland and Slovenia distanced themselves from the deal.

Sites belonging to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Consumer Protection Week were vandalized by Anonymous, a loose collection of cyber rebels who have helped lead the charge against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA.

The hackers replaced the sites with profanity-laced statements and a violent German-language video satirizing the treaty.

At the same time, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk said Friday the country was abandoning plans to ratify the deal. He said he now sees his earlier support for ACTA as a mistake.

“I was wrong,”

he said at a news conference.

His announcement came after Slovenia’s government also said Friday that it is halting the ratification of ACTA.

“This agreement is obviously not a matter of understanding, but of major misunderstanding,”

Slovenian Education Minister Radovan Zerjav said.

The developments are bad news for industrialized countries such as the United States, which have pushed ACTA as a way of defending the entertainment industry and luxury goods manufacturers from pirates and counterfeiters. American officials spent years negotiating ACTA in an effort to harmonize intellectual property protection across different countries.

The goal is to help countries fight everything from fake pharmaceuticals to pirated music, but grass-roots activists — many of them in Eastern Europe — have been waging weeks of protests against what they see as moves intended to clamp down on free expression and Internet privacy.

So far around 20 countries have signed up to the deal, a key step before ratification. Four EU countries have now backed away from it — Poland, Slovenia, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic — and its approval at the European Union level appears increasingly uncertain.

Tusk also said Friday that he sent a letter to the European People’s Party, a center-right group in the European Parliament to which his Civic Platform belongs, urging it not to back ACTA in its current form.

Back in the United States, the Trade Commission confirmed that the sites had been compromised, saying in an email that they had been taken down and wouldn’t be brought back

“until we’re satisfied that any vulnerability has been addressed.”

Anonymous boasted of stealing a large amount of personal data from Trade Commission employees — including everything from banking statements to dating website information.

The Trade Commission said that while it was still investigating the hack,

“the nature of the site limits information that could have been accessed.”

 

 

Gera reported from Warsaw. Associated Press writer Ali Zerdin contributed to this report from Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Source: AP via Brisbane Times

 

 

US sites hacked as objections grow to piracy deal

Raphael Satter and Vanessa Gera
AP via Brisbane Times

Opponents of a controversial global copyright treaty counted three victories Friday as American government websites were hacked and the Eastern European nations of Poland and Slovenia distanced themselves from the deal.

Sites belonging to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the National Consumer Protection Week were vandalized by Anonymous, a loose collection of cyber rebels who have helped lead the charge against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA.

The hackers replaced the sites with profanity-laced statements and a violent German-language video satirizing the treaty.

At the same time, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk said Friday the country was abandoning plans to ratify the deal. He said he now sees his earlier support for ACTA as a mistake.

“I was wrong,”

he said at a news conference.

His announcement came after Slovenia’s government also said Friday that it is halting the ratification of ACTA.

“This agreement is obviously not a matter of understanding, but of major misunderstanding,”

Slovenian Education Minister Radovan Zerjav said.

The developments are bad news for industrialized countries such as the United States, which have pushed ACTA as a way of defending the entertainment industry and luxury goods manufacturers from pirates and counterfeiters. American officials spent years negotiating ACTA in an effort to harmonize intellectual property protection across different countries.

The goal is to help countries fight everything from fake pharmaceuticals to pirated music, but grass-roots activists — many of them in Eastern Europe — have been waging weeks of protests against what they see as moves intended to clamp down on free expression and Internet privacy.

So far around 20 countries have signed up to the deal, a key step before ratification. Four EU countries have now backed away from it — Poland, Slovenia, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic — and its approval at the European Union level appears increasingly uncertain.

Tusk also said Friday that he sent a letter to the European People’s Party, a center-right group in the European Parliament to which his Civic Platform belongs, urging it not to back ACTA in its current form.

Back in the United States, the Trade Commission confirmed that the sites had been compromised, saying in an email that they had been taken down and wouldn’t be brought back

“until we’re satisfied that any vulnerability has been addressed.”

Anonymous boasted of stealing a large amount of personal data from Trade Commission employees — including everything from banking statements to dating website information.

The Trade Commission said that while it was still investigating the hack,

“the nature of the site limits information that could have been accessed.”

 

 

Gera reported from Warsaw. Associated Press writer Ali Zerdin contributed to this report from Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Source: AP via Brisbane Times

 

Polish government asks European Parliament not to sign ACTA

Editorial note. ACTA is in its death throes, and the lethal blow came from young Europeans determined to keep their freedom of speech, with Poland leading the chage. Yes, “No rent-a-cop…, stand a chance against a resolutely uncooperative populace.” Congratulations to all those who organized on short notice and went out in the cold to protest against this stealth draconian law! It’s carnival time! DC

Protester "cool guy" wears Guy Fawkes mask at anti-ACTA demonstration (Photo: Reuters/David W. Cerny).

 

PM Tusk has admitted he was wrong to support the treaty

By Alice Trudelle
Warsaw Business Journal

On Friday, Prime Minister Donald Tusk completed the about-face his government had started on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

Donald Tusk (Courtesy of Flickr/KPRM).

“I sent a letter today to all the party leaders who cooperate with the Civic Platform and the Polish People’s Party in the European People’s Party, including prime ministers, the [German] chancellor, presidents of some countries and the leadership of the European People’s Party, with a proposal to reject ACTA in the shape that was negotiated by the European Commission,”

Mr Tusk told a news conference Friday evening.

The PM admitted that the position prepared by Polish officials on ACTA over the last few months was

“reckless.”

“I was wrong. … It would be a sin to maintain a mistaken belief … the agreement does not correspond to the reality of the 21st century. The battle for the right to property should also respect the right to freedom.”

On January 26, the European Commission and 22 EU countries – including Poland – signed the deal, joining Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US. But ACTA also needs to be ratified by the European Parliament and by each of the 27 EU member states in order to be implemented in the EU.

 

Source: Warsaw Business Journal

 

Slovenian government leans towards freezing ACTA

By Staff
The Slovenia Times

The government is leaning towards freezing the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Minister for Education, Science, Culture and Sport Žiga Turk told the press coming out of a government session.

“We do not see a practical need for Slovenia to ratify it in this very moment,” Turk told the press.

He noted that the matter had only been discussed informally, and that the final announcement would be made by Economic Development and Technology Minister Radovan Žerjav.

The Economic Development Ministry said Žerjav would speak about ACTA at Friday’s public presentation of opinions, which has been organised by the parliamentary EU Affairs Committee.

The debate will coincide with the second protest against ACTA (the first one was held two weeks ago), organised by online activists.

According to the initiator of the protest, Gregor Plemenko, the operation undertaken by hacker collective Anonymous to push the government to freeze the ratification of ACTA was still under way, despite a drop of activity from last weekend, when the group brought multiple websites down.

Meanwhile the editors of the E-demokracija.si portal said that Turk’s statement was nothing but an effort to downplay tomorrow’s debate.

They noted that the freezing of ACTA was not enough, as the agreement should be rejected completely and the opportunity to discuss a better regulation of the internet seized.

The agreement was signed on 26 January in Tokyo by representatives of the European Commission and 22 of the 27 EU member states, including Slovenia.

The signing provoked outrage around Europe and several countries have already halted ratification procedures, among them Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

The accord is designed to protect copyright and crack down on online piracy, but critics say it will lead to intrusive surveillance and censorship.

 

Sources: Warsaw Business Journal | The Slovenia Times | Haiti Chery (editorial comment, photos)

 

Background on ACTA:
Massive Worldwide Anti-ACTA Protests
ACTA Ratification Suspended in Poland
ACTA Not Yet International Law | French MEP Quits in Protest
Block Thursday Jan 26th EU Ratification of Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA

 

 

 

Polish government asks European Parliament not to sign ACTA

Editorial note. ACTA is in its death throes, and the lethal blow came from young Europeans determined to keep their freedom of speech, with Poland leading the chage. Yes, “No rent-a-cop…, stand a chance against a resolutely uncooperative populace.” Congratulations to all those who organized on short notice and went out in the cold to protest against this stealth draconian law! It’s carnival time! DC

Protester "cool guy" wears Guy Fawkes mask at anti-ACTA demonstration (Photo: Reuters/David W. Cerny).

 

PM Tusk has admitted he was wrong to support the treaty

By Alice Trudelle
Warsaw Business Journal

On Friday, Prime Minister Donald Tusk completed the about-face his government had started on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

Donald Tusk (Courtesy of Flickr/KPRM).

“I sent a letter today to all the party leaders who cooperate with the Civic Platform and the Polish People’s Party in the European People’s Party, including prime ministers, the [German] chancellor, presidents of some countries and the leadership of the European People’s Party, with a proposal to reject ACTA in the shape that was negotiated by the European Commission,”

Mr Tusk told a news conference Friday evening.

The PM admitted that the position prepared by Polish officials on ACTA over the last few months was

“reckless.”

“I was wrong. … It would be a sin to maintain a mistaken belief … the agreement does not correspond to the reality of the 21st century. The battle for the right to property should also respect the right to freedom.”

On January 26, the European Commission and 22 EU countries – including Poland – signed the deal, joining Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US. But ACTA also needs to be ratified by the European Parliament and by each of the 27 EU member states in order to be implemented in the EU.

 

Source: Warsaw Business Journal

 

Slovenian government leans towards freezing ACTA

By Staff
The Slovenia Times

The government is leaning towards freezing the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Minister for Education, Science, Culture and Sport Žiga Turk told the press coming out of a government session.

“We do not see a practical need for Slovenia to ratify it in this very moment,” Turk told the press.

He noted that the matter had only been discussed informally, and that the final announcement would be made by Economic Development and Technology Minister Radovan Žerjav.

The Economic Development Ministry said Žerjav would speak about ACTA at Friday’s public presentation of opinions, which has been organised by the parliamentary EU Affairs Committee.

The debate will coincide with the second protest against ACTA (the first one was held two weeks ago), organised by online activists.

According to the initiator of the protest, Gregor Plemenko, the operation undertaken by hacker collective Anonymous to push the government to freeze the ratification of ACTA was still under way, despite a drop of activity from last weekend, when the group brought multiple websites down.

Meanwhile the editors of the E-demokracija.si portal said that Turk’s statement was nothing but an effort to downplay tomorrow’s debate.

They noted that the freezing of ACTA was not enough, as the agreement should be rejected completely and the opportunity to discuss a better regulation of the internet seized.

The agreement was signed on 26 January in Tokyo by representatives of the European Commission and 22 of the 27 EU member states, including Slovenia.

The signing provoked outrage around Europe and several countries have already halted ratification procedures, among them Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

The accord is designed to protect copyright and crack down on online piracy, but critics say it will lead to intrusive surveillance and censorship.

 

Sources: Warsaw Business Journal | The Slovenia Times | Haiti Chery (editorial comment, photos)

 

Background on ACTA:
Massive Worldwide Anti-ACTA Protests
ACTA Ratification Suspended in Poland
ACTA Not Yet International Law | French MEP Quits in Protest
Block Thursday Jan 26th EU Ratification of Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA

 

 

Leave a Reply