Poison Seeds, Herbicides, Pushed Again on Haitian Farmers | Des semences empoisonnées et des herbicides encore forcées sur les paysans haïtiens

GMO_Field_400

Editorial comment.  If you have not figured this out by now from observing the outcome of the aid to Haiti, I’ll say it again. Aid from the U.S. to Haiti in particular, and the Third World in general, is a way of laundering government kickbacks to industry, with USAID usually serving as the intermediary. The aid is not intended to help the recipient but to assist U.S. companies that cannot sell their goods. Examples include pharmaceutical companies that cannot sell their mercury-tainted vaccines, or large agricultural concerns whose seeds have been banned throughout the world. Instead of burning these harmful products, which would be the appropriate course of action, the manufacturers “donate” them to needy countries, for a generous price from USAID: no bidding necessary. In June 2010, thousands of Haitian farmers burned their gift of Monsanto seeds, but over one hundred more tons have arrived, along with the pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers. With Haiti’s ministry of agriculture currently being headed by a former rice importer, this is hardly surprising. Yes, it is definitely true that these people never give up. And neither should we. Not ever.

Dady Chery, Editor
Haiti Chery

 

Fertilizers, hybrid seeds, GMO … should we be afraid?

By Edner Son Décime
AlterPresse

English | French

Translated from the French by Dady Chery for Haiti Chery

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 30, 2012 — As the authorities push for the use of hybrid seeds to modernize Haitian agriculture, doubts are being raised about the actual benefits for Haiti, AlterPresse notes.

Hebert Docteur (credit: Haiti Libre).

At the launch of the Spring 2012 growing season in Dumay on March 23rd, Agriculture Minister Herbert Docteur, and Project-Winner director  Jean-Robert Estime, strongly endorsed the use of tractors, new cultivation techniques, fertilizer, and hybrid seeds as means of supporting and increasing the productivity of Haitian farmers.

“150 tons of hybrid seed will be imported as part of the 2012 campaign,”

said the Project-Winner Director. [For more on Project Winner, see the article below. DC]

“The fertilizer will be subsidized at up to 33% by the Ministry of Agriculture. It will be more expensive, but of course more available to farmers,”

added Agriculture Minister Docteur.

Seeds and fertilizers will be regularly available in the farm stores, they promise.

Specter of enforced dependency

According to Minister Docteur, the hybrids

“from crossing two varieties of plants may be used only once. Next year we must buy more.”

Docteur goes on to argue that

“they’ve been used in Haiti since the 1970’s and have the potential for a higher return than the [natural] local seeds.”

But at what cost? The farmer who uses hybrids is forced to repurchase seeds since they are not produced in Haiti.

Hybrid seeds are produced by multinational agribusiness companies. The fact that the seeds are not reproducible requires the producers to buy from these companies at each harvest. Thus a new market is created for these agribusiness giants, experts emphasize.

Moreover, hybrid seeds handled without protective wear like gloves or masks might adversely affect the health of farmers and the environment because these seeds are treated with toxic fungicides, herbicides, etc.

Louise Sperling, a researcher at the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) who has led a multi-agency study on seed security, told Haiti Grassroots Watch (an AlterPresse media partner) in March 2011 that

“direct seed aid — when not needed, and practiced repeatedly, causes real harm. It undermines local systems, creates dependencies and stifles any real development of the commercial sector. “

According to research by Haiti Grassroots Watch, the approval of hybrid-seed donations is

“in direct contradiction to Haitian law and international conventions that protect the gene pool and ecosystem in general.”

Haitian soil has remained rich for centuries. Farmers traditionally work their farms in cooperative groups called combites and sow seeds that have been adapted to the island for over 300 years.

According to an excerpt from an internal report of USAID/Project Winner obtained by Haiti Grassroots Watch journalists, the use of hybrid seeds during the “Spring 2012 crop year” appears to be all set up for Monsanto’s gift. Project Winner writes:

“Despite a media campaign against hybrids, under labeling of GMO / Agent Orange / Round Up, the seeds have been used almost everywhere; the real message got through, although at a level below our expectations, [and] we are working as fast as possible with farmers to increase as much as possible the use of hybrid seeds.”

Nevertheless, some agronomists believe that hybrid seeds can be an alternative for Haitian agriculture since there are serious problems of reduced yield and decreased soil fertility. And in any case, the country, or at least the Ministry of Agriculture, should have access to the appropriate technologies and invest systematically in biological research.

According to other agronomists consulted by AlterPress, what we should be afraid of are not the seeds per se. It is the ideological component behind the facade that must be denounced. It is the commercial logic of multinational enterprises that must be denounced, they said, noting the need to avoid confusing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) with hybrid seeds.

A GMO seed is a seed whose genetic material has been modified to give it new properties. This change is done by genetic engineering techniques that introduce [into the seed] other genes from other organisms such as viruses, bacteria, yeast, fungi, plants or animals.

[Some worrisome genes that get introduced into GMOs include:

  • Genes for antibiotic resistance that get spread into the environment;
  • Genes that allow the plant grown from the seed to transfer its genetic material more easily;
  • Genes that make the plant resistant to the poisonous herbicides that the farmers are required to spread on the fields; these genes turn the GMOs into noxious weeds that are impossible to eradicate. DC]

Hybrid seeds are usually obtained by [genetically] crossing varieties of plants of the same species but these seeds cannot reproduce in the farmer’s field.

The Ministry of Agriculture and the GMOs

According to Minister of Agriculture Herbert Docteur, his office’s scientific position regarding the issue of GMOs is as follows:

“If laboratories have tested these products long enough to prove that they cannot kill, then we are ready to use them,” he said.

Docteur notes that the Haitian population already consumes GMOs especially in meats imported from the Dominican Republic.

“A turkey leg [imported from Haiti’s neighbor] is larger than that of a goat. How do you make this possible?”

Argues the minister of agriculture.

A former rice importer, Docteur believes that

“We have prejudices [against GMOs] in Haiti. How do we know that the rice or corn we eat doesn’t contain GMOs?”

Docteur anticipates the triumph of the GMO era.

“In 50 to 100 years, 90% of the products we consume will be GMO,”

he prophesies, stressing the need to increase global agricultural production

“to meet the galloping increase in world population.”

However, “as things currently stand, the world’s crops could feed 12 billion people without trouble,” says Jean Ziegler, former Special Rapporteur for the Right to Food Council of Human Rights UN (2000-2008), in his book “Mass Destruction” released in October 2011.

When Monsanto comes to Haiti’s aid

By Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

English | French

Translated from the French by Dady Chery for Haiti Chery

Thursday, June 4, 2010 between 8,000 and 12,000 Haitian peasants, supported by twenty local and international organizations, marched in the town of Hinche, in the center of the island of Haiti, to express their disagreement with the policy of “aid” to the government’s agricultural sector: in particular, its decision to accept the seeds offered by the agricultural industry giant Monsanto.

Protests against Monsanto seeds in June 2010.

The transnational has just pledged to donate 475 tons of seeds, together with their arsenal of pesticides and fertilizers. A first shipment has already been distributed in pilot centers and sold “discounted” to farmers. The operation is part of Project Winner (Watershed Initiative for Natural Environmental Resources), which is supporting almost 10,000 farmers in resuming their activities. Launched in 2009, the project is overseen by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

One is no longer presented the Monsanto that manufactured the Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War as well as dioxin-based products before converting to agricultural biotechnology. Well represented within the U.S. administration (1), the company is implicated in several cases related to environmental contamination by pollutants including its herbicides (2). It is also criticized for helping to ruin tens of thousands of farmers in the poorest countries, like India, where the over-indebtedness of cotton farmers has led to massive waves of suicide. [As of 2012, the number of impoverished Indian farmers who had committed suicide was in the hundreds of thousands. DC]  For his part, the director of operations for Haiti’s Project Winner is none other than Jean-Robert Estime, who was the foreign minister for “president-for-life”, Mr Jean-Claude Duvalier.

Mr. Jean-Yves Urfié, Spiritan priest who devoted forty years to work with Haitian peasants, was first to sound the alarm about the nature of the “generous help” from Monsanto, fearing that it involved Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Minister of Agriculture, Joanas Gue, immediately defended himself and assured having taken

“every precaution before accepting the offer from Monsanto” (3).

We now know that the seeds offered consist of maize seed “hybrid,” non-transgenic. The expected productivity of these seeds requires the use of herbicides and fertilizers well above that required for traditional or indigenous seeds. Furthermore, only the first generation of these seeds is fertile. If a habit of using them (instead of seeds from previous harvests) develops, then this will mean buying seeds, fertilizers and herbicides from Monsanto.

One can understand how a “super productive” seed would be welcome in a country lacking in food. However, Jean-Pierre Ricot, an economist of the Haitian Advocacy Platform for Alternative Development (PAPDA), believes this is the introduction of a market logic that does not correspond to the peasant culture of Haiti,

“Haitian peasants have traditionally been able to produce and reproduce their own seeds, organic and local, for their families and the local market. Monsanto wants to integrate farmers in a market in which they do not control the quality and price of seeds, [and] turn a Haitian peasant into a assistant instead of a producer. (4) »

Whatever the motivations of the transnational, the choice of such a partnership raises questions about the direction of aid policy and the future of Haitian agriculture. The survival of the peasant population, nearly 70% of the total, depends on this key sector that is already battered by “U.S. aid” … and that this reconstruction could help to “rebuild.”

By 1981, during the Reagan administration, USAID had pressured the Haitian government to substitute export crops (cocoa, cotton, essential oils) for food crops. The operation was facilitated by the provision of food assistance equivalent to U.S. $11 million. In 1995, an agreement between former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and U.S. President William Clinton to lift trade barriers, authorized the “dumping” of (subsidized) U.S. agricultural products on the local market.

Although self-sufficient in the 1980s, on the eve of the earthquake the Haitian national food production met less than 40% of the local demand. The rest came from imports and international aid (5): a situation that worsened the consequences of the disaster. The number of people experiencing severe food insecurity rose from 500,000 before the earthquake to more than 2 million today. The number of families with food stocks fell from 44 to 17%, and food prices have jumped 25% on average.

The unprecedented food crisis, evidenced by the riots of 2008, forced the major players in international aid to acknowledge their “mistake” and recommend placing agriculture at the center of development policies (6).

Thus Mr. Clinton, currently UN Special Envoy to Haiti, apologized to the Haitian people for the damage caused by his administration (7). Several specialists, and even some members of Congress have proposed that the United States buy local products for distribution to people rather than send their own agricultural products. All in vain. Currently Haiti remains one of the largest customers of U.S. rice.

As worried Haitian President René Préval said during a meeting with his U.S. counterpart on March 10th 2010:

“if one continues to send food and water from abroad, this will compete with the national production of Haiti and Haitian trade. “

According to Gerald Maturin, a former agriculture minister who now heads the Regional Coordination of Organizations Southeast (CROSE), the reconstruction depends on

“the inclusion of the peasantry in the national economy and life of the nation “(8).

And this sector is demanding not to be ignored any longer in the definition of aid and the implementation of reconstruction projects.

Within the context of emergency food aid, and the approach of the hurricane season, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) promised to supply 345,000 tons of seeds by the year end. The specifications of this institution provide for the purchase of local seeds and technical support to farmers. While the main actor of public relief shows a strategy consistent with the magnitude of the agricultural and food needs of the Haitian people, why does it rely on Monsanto to supply 0.13% of the total seed that Haiti needs this year?

Is the decision to introduce sterile hybrid seeds entirely justified by the food emergency?

Does this not open the way to a gradual conquest of the Haitian market by transnational seed companies in search of new markets?

Ultimately, the drop of water that would go unnoticed – and just in time to restore the reputation of a company and criticized for its disappointing rerod (9) – does it not threaten to turn into a flood during next few years?

References

  • (1) The links between Monsanto and the U.S. government are numerous. These include former Monsanto CEO Linda Fischer, who was appointed Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2003, and Michael R. Taylor, vice president for public policy at Monsanto, which was propelled in the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti to the deputy commissioner position at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • (2) The multinational has been convicted of contaminating soil, ground water and the blood of people with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the U.S. and the UK (Wales), and of falsely promoting in the United States and France (convicted in New York in 1996 and Lyon in 2008) its weedkiller Roundup as being of a so-called biodegradable nature.
  • (3) “No GMO seeds in Haiti, according to Agriculture Minister,” AlterPresse, May 1, 2010.
  • (4) “The future of Haiti’s agriculture according to the American Monsanto”, Rue 89, May 28, 2010.
  • (5) “Food aid and domestic production: the need for adequacy,” Agropresse, March 1, 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ …
  • (6) “Agriculture for Development,” 2008 Report on World Development, published in October 2007.
  • (7) March 10, 2010 speech before the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the U.S. Senate.
  • (8) RFI, May 12, 2010. Agriculture Minister in 1997, during the first term of Mr. Preval, Mr. Maturin attempted land reform in favor of the peasantry injured by a succession of governments.
  • (9) The profits of the firm in the first quarter of 2010 showed a loss of $ 19 million compared to the same period last year, marking a decline of 19% in one year (AFP, April 7, 2010).

VIDEO: “The World According to Monsanto”. Marie-Monique Robin’s full-length award-winning documentary describing Monsanto’s crimes and plans to control the world’s food supply (109 min).
Sources: AlterPresse (French) | Le Monde Diplomatique, Tuesday, June 15, 2010 (French) | YouTube | Haiti Chery (English translations, images, commentary)

UPDATE:

May 10, 2012 (Haiti Libre) In Haiti’s new Cabinet, Mr. Herbert Docteur was not reappointed to his post as head of the Ministry of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Rural Development (MARNDR). He has been replaced by agronomist Thomas Jacques.

Related:
Aid as a Trojan Horse. On the Anniversary of the Haitian Earthquake
Foreign Aid, Foreign Wastes
Where the Devil Did the Reconstruction Money Go?
Fertile Land Seized for New Sweatshop Zone
Commentaire. Si vous n’aviez pas compris tout cela en observant les résultats de l’aide en Haïti ces deux dernières années, je le repete encore une fois. L’aide américaine pour Haïti en particulier, et le Tiers Monde en général, est une methode de blanchissement du gouvernement américaine pour ses industries, avec l’USAID comme l’intermédiaire. L’aide n’est pas destinée à aider le bénéficiaire; c’est pour les entreprises américaines qui ne peuvent pas vendre leurs marchandises. Les exemples incluent les sociétés pharmaceutiques qui ne peuvent pas vendre leurs vaccins contaminés avec du mercure, ou de grandes sociétés agricoles qui sont interdies au monde entier de vendre leurs semences. Au lieu de brûler ces produits nocifs — ce qui serait le plan d’action approprié — les fabricants font des “dons” aux pays nécessiteux, pour un prix bien généreux de l’USAID: sans d’autres offres. En Juin 2010, des milliers de paysans haïtiens avaient brûlé leur don de semences de Monsanto, mais des centaines de tonnes de plus plus sont arrivées, et en plus les pesticides, les herbicides et les engrais. Avec un ministère de l’agriculture en Haïti qui est actuellement dirigé par un ancien importateur de riz, ce n’est guère surprenant. Oui, il est certainement vrai que ces gens ne se lasseront jamais. Et nous ne le devrions pas non plus. Non jamais.

Dady Chery, rédacteur en chef
Haïti Chery

Engrais, semences hybrides, Ogm…faut-il avoir peur?

Par Edner Fils Decime
AlterPresse

anglais | francais

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 30 mars 2012 — Alors que les autorités souhaitent passer par l’utilisation des semences hybrides pour moderniser l’agriculture haïtienne, des doutes sont soulevés quant aux bénéfices réels pour Haïti, observe AlterPresse.

Hebert Docteur (credit: Haiti Libre).

Lors du lancement de la campagne agricole de printemps 2012 à Dumay le 23 mars 2012, le ministre de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur, et le directeur du projet Winner, Jean-Robert Estimé, ont vivement soutenu l’utilisation de tracteurs, de nouvelles techniques de cultures, d’engrais et de semences hybrides pour supporter la production et augmenter la productivité des agriculteurs haïtiens.

« 150 tonnes de semences hybrides seront importées dans le cadre de la campagne 2012 »,

a informé le directeur de Winner.

« Les engrais seront subventionnés à hauteur de 33% par le ministère de l’agriculture. Ce sera plus cher, mais naturellement plus disponible pour les agriculteurs »,

a ajouté pour sa part le ministre démissionnaire de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur.

Semences et engrais seront régulièrement disponibles dans les boutiques d’intrants agricoles pour les paysans, promettent-ils.

Le spectre de la dépendance renforcée

Selon le ministre Docteur, les hybrides

« proviennent du croisement de deux variétés de plantes et ne peuvent être utilisées qu’une seule fois. L’année prochaine il faut en acheter d’autres ».

Docteur poursuit en soutenant

qu’ « elles sont utilisées en Haïti depuis les années 1970 et possèdent un potentiel de rendement supérieur aux semences [naturelles] locales ».

Mais à quel prix ? Le planteur qui utilise les hybrides est forcé d’en racheter or elles ne sont pas produites en Haïti.

Les semences hybrides sont fabriquées par des multinationales agro-alimentaires. Le fait qu’elles ne sont pas reproductibles oblige les producteurs à en acheter à ces entreprises à chaque récolte. Aussi un nouveau marché se créé pour ces géants de l’agro-alimentaire, soulignent des spécialistes.

De plus, manipuler les semences hybrides sans protection comme des gants ou des masques peut avoir des effets néfastes sur la santé des agriculteurs et sur l’environnement. Car ces semences toxiques sont traitées avec des fongicides, des herbicides, etc.

Louise Sperling, chercheuse du Centre international d’agriculture tropicale (Ciat) ayant dirigé une étude multi-agence sur la sécurité des semences, a déclaré à Ayiti Kale Je en mars 2011 (partenariat médiatique dont AlterPresse est membre) que

« l’aide directe en semences –lorsqu’elle n’est pas nécessaire, et pratiquée de manière répétitive –constitue un préjudice réel. Il sape les systèmes locaux, crée des dépendances et étouffe tout véritable développement du secteur commercial ».

Selon l’enquête menée par Ayiti Kale Je, approuver des dons de semences hybrides est

Le sol haïtien est resté riche pendant des siècles. Traditionellement, les agriculteurs travaillent dans leurs fermes en groupes coopératifs appelés combites et utilisent des semances adaptées à l’île pendant plus de 300 ans.

« en contradiction directe avec la loi haïtienne et les conventions internationales qui visent à protéger le patrimoine génétique et l’écosystème en général ».

L’utilisation des semences hybrides dans « la campagne agricole printemps 2012 » semble être dûment préparée depuis le don de Monsanto, à en croire un extrait d’un rapport interne de Usaid/Winner obtenu par les journalistes de Ayiti Kale Je.

« Malgré toute une campagne médiatique contre les hybrides, sous couvert d’OGM/Agent Orange/Round Up, ces semences ont été utilisées presque partout, le vrai message est passé, bien qu’à un niveau en deçà de nos espérances [et] nous travaillons actuellement le plus vite possible avec les paysans afin d’augmenter autant que possible l’utilisation des semences hybrides », a écrit Winner.

Toutefois certains agronomes pensent que les semences hybrides peuvent être une alternative pour l’agriculture haïtienne surtout qu’il y a de sérieux problèmes de rendements et une baisse de la fertilité des sols. Néanmoins le pays, ou tout au moins le Ministère de l’agriculture devrait disposer des technologies adéquates et investir systématiquement dans les recherches biologiques.

Ce dont il faut avoir peur ce ne sont pas des semences en soi, c’est le volet idéologique qui est caché derrière la façade aide qu’il faut dénoncer, selon d’autres agronomes consultés par AlterPresse. C’est la logique marchande des entreprises multinationales qu’il faut dénoncer, expliquent-ils, en précisant qu’il faut éviter la confusion entre Organisme génétiquement modifié (Ogm) et semences hybrides.

Une semence ogm est un organisme végétal dont le patrimoine génétique a été modifié afin de lui conférer de nouvelles propriétés. Cette modification s’opère par des techniques de génie génétique pour introduire d’autres gènes provenant d’autres organismes tels virus, bactérie, levure, champignon, plante ou animal.

[Certaines gènes inquiétantes qui sont introduites dans les OGM:

  • Des gènes de résistance aux antibiotiques qui se répandent dans l’environnement;
  • Des gènes qui permettent à la plante cultivée de la semence de transférer son matériel génétique plus facilement;
  • Des gènes qui rendent la plante résistante aux herbicides toxiques que les agriculteurs sont tenus de répandre sur les champs; ces gènes tournent les OGM en des mauvaises “herbes” nuisibles qui sont impossibles à éradiquer. DC]

Les semences hybrides sont généralement obtenues par le croisement de variétés de plantes de la même espèce. Mais ne peuvent pas se reproduire dans le champ du paysan.

Le Ministère de l’agriculture et les Ogm

Pour le ministre de l’agriculture démissionnaire Herbert Docteur, l’institution qu’il dirige a une position scientifique par rapport à la question des Ogm.

« Si des laboratoires ont testé ces produits pendant un temps suffisamment long pour prouver qu’ils ne peuvent pas tuer, nous sommes prêts à les utiliser », dit-il.

Docteur rappelle tout de même que la population haïtienne consomme déjà des Ogm surtout avec la viande importée de la République Dominicaine.

« Une cuisse de dinde [importée du pays voisin d’Haïti] est plus grosse que celle d’un cabri. Comment voulez-vous que cela soit possible ? »,

argue le ministre de l’agriculture.

Ancien importateur de riz, Docteur croit que

« nous avons des préjugés [sur les Ogm] en Haïti. Qu’est-ce qui nous dit que le riz ou le maïs que nous consommons ne contient pas d’Ogm?»

Docteur anticipe le triomphe de l’ère Ogm.

« Dans 50 à 100 ans, 90% des produits que nous allons consommer seront des Ogm »,

prophétise-t-il en soulignant la nécessité d’augmenter la production agricole mondiale

« pour répondre à l’augmentation galopante de la population mondiale».

Pourtant,

« dans l’état actuel, les cultures mondiales pourraient nourrir sans problème 12 milliards d’êtres humains »,

relève Jean Ziegler, ancien rapporteur spécial pour le droit à l’alimentation du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’Onu (2000 à 2008), dans son livre « Destruction massive » publié en octobre 2011.

Origine: AlterPresse

Quand Monsanto vient au secours d’Haïti

Par Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

anglais | francais

Jeudi 4 juin, 2010 entre 8 000 et 12 000 paysans haïtiens, soutenus par une vingtaine d’organisations locales et internationales, manifestaient dans la commune de Hinche, au centre de l’île, pour exprimer leur désaccord avec la politique d’« aide » au secteur agricole du gouvernement. En particulier sa décision d’accepter les semences offertes par le géant de l’industrie agronomique Monsanto.

Manifestations contre les semences de Monsanto en Juin 2010.

La transnationale vient de promettre un don de 475 tonnes de semences, avec leur arsenal de pesticides et d’engrais. Un premier arrivage a déjà été distribué dans des centres pilotes et vendus « à prix réduit » aux paysans. L’opération s’inscrit dans le cadre du projet Winner (Initiative bassins versants pour les ressources naturelles et environnementales) qui épaule près de 10 000 agriculteurs pour la reprise de leur activité. Lancé en 2009, le projet est supervisé par l’Agence américaine pour le développement international (USAID).

On ne présente plus Monsanto, qui fabriquait l’agent orange utilisé pendant la guerre du Vietnam ainsi que des produits à base de dioxine avant de se convertir aux biotechnologies agricoles. Bien représentée au sein de l’administration américaine (1), l’entreprise se trouve mise en cause dans plusieurs affaires liées à la contamination de l’environnement par des produits polluants, dont ses herbicides (2). Elle est par ailleurs dénoncée pour avoir contribué à ruiner des dizaines de milliers de paysans dans les pays les plus pauvres, comme l’Inde, où le surendettement des semeurs de coton a entraîné des vagues massives de suicide. De son côté, le directeur des opérations en Haïti du projet Winner n’est autre que M. Jean-Robert Estimé, qui fut ministre des affaires étrangères du « président à vie », M. Jean-Claude Duvalier.

M. Jean-Yves Urfié, père spiritain engagé depuis quarante ans auprès des paysans haïtiens, a, le premier, alerté quant à la nature de « l’aide généreuse », de Monsanto, craignant qu’il ne s’agisse d’organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM). Le ministre de l’agriculture, M. Joanas Gué, s’en est immédiatement défendu, assurant avoir pris « toutes les précautions avant d’accepter l’offre de la multinationale Monsanto » (3).

On sait désormais que les semences offertes se composent de semences de maïs dites « hybrides », non transgéniques. La productivité attendue de ces graines nécessite une utilisation d’herbicides et d’engrais bien supérieure à celle nécessaire pour les semences traditionnelles ou autochtones. De plus, seule la première génération de ces semences est fertile. Si l’habitude est prise de les utiliser (à la place des semences tirées des récoltes précédentes), il faudra alors acheter semences, engrais et herbicides auprès de Monsanto.

On peut comprendre comment une semence « super productive » pourrait être la bienvenue dans un pays qui manque de nourriture. Toutefois, M. Jean-Pierre Ricot, économiste à la Plateforme haïtienne de plaidoyer pour un développement alternatif (PAPDA), estime qu’il s’agit de l’introduction d’une logique de marché qui ne correspond pas à la culture paysanne d’Haïti :

« Les paysans haïtiens ont traditionnellement la capacité de produire et de reproduire leur propre semence, organique et locale, à destination de leur famille et du marché de proximité. Monsanto veut intégrer les agriculteurs sur un marché qu’ils ne contrôlent pas en matière de qualité de semence et de prix [et] faire du paysan haïtien un assisté plutôt qu’un producteur. (4) »

Quelles que soient les motivations de la transnationale, le choix d’un tel partenariat soulève des interrogations quant à l’orientation de la politique d’aide et à l’avenir de l’agriculture haïtienne. La survie de la population paysanne, près de 70 % du total, dépend de ce secteur-clé déjà malmené par « l’aide américaine »… et que la reconstruction aurait pu aider à « remettre sur pied ».

Dès 1981, sous l’administration Reagan, l’USAID fait pression sur le gouvernement haïtien pour substituer des produits d’exportation (cacao, coton, huiles essentielles) aux cultures vivrières. L’opération sera facilitée par l’octroi d’une aide alimentaire américaine équivalente à 11 millions de dollars. En 1995, un accord passé entre l’ancien président, M. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, et le président américain William Clinton pour lever les barrières douanières, a autorisé le « dumping » des produits agricoles américains (subventionnés) sur le marché local.

Autosuffisante dans les années 1980, la production nationale haïtienne alimentaire satisfaisait moins de 40 % de la demande alimentaire locale à la veille du séisme. Le reste provenait des importations et de l’aide internationale (5): une situation qui n’a fait qu’aggraver les conséquences de la catastrophe. Le nombre de personnes vivant en situation d’insécurité alimentaire sévère est passé de 500 000 avant le séisme à plus de 2 millions aujourd’hui. Le nombre de familles disposant de stocks de nourriture a chuté de 44 à 17 % et les prix des denrées alimentaires ont bondi de 25 % en moyenne.

La crise alimentaire sans précédant dont témoignèrent les émeutes de la faim en 2008, avait acculé les grands acteurs de l’aide internationale à reconnaître leur « erreur » et recommander de placer l’agriculture au centre des politiques de développement (6).

Ainsi M. Clinton, aujourd’hui envoyé spécial pour Haïti à l’ONU, a-t-il présenté ses excuses au peuple haïtien pour les dommages causés par son administration (7). Plusieurs spécialistes, et même certains membres du Congrès américain, ont proposé que les Etats-Unis achètent les productions locales pour les distribuer aux populations plutôt que d’envoyer leurs propres produits agricoles. En vain. Dans l’état actuel, Haïti demeure l’un des tout premiers clients du riz américain.

Comme s’en est inquiété le président Haïtien M. René Préval lors de sa rencontre avec son homologue américain le 10 mars dernier :

« si on continue à envoyer de la nourriture et de l’eau de l’étranger, cela va concurrencer la production nationale d’Haïti et le commerce haïtien ».

Selon M. Gérald Maturin, ancien ministre de l’agriculture aujourd’hui à la tête de la Coordination régionale des organisations du Sud-Est (CROSE), la reconstruction dépend

« de l’inclusion de la paysannerie dans l’économie nationale et dans la vie de la nation » (8).

Celle-ci réclame aujourd’hui de ne plus être ignorée dans la définition de l’aide et la mise en place des projets de reconstruction.

Dans le contexte d’urgence alimentaire, et à l’approche de la saison cyclonique, l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) promet l’envoi de 345 000 tonnes de semences d’ici la fin de l’année. Le cahier des charges de l’institution prévoit l’achat de semences locales ainsi que l’appui technique aux paysans. Alors que le principal acteur public de l’aide d’urgence affiche une stratégie d’ampleur cohérente avec les besoins agricoles et alimentaires de la population haïtienne, pourquoi faire appel à Monsanto pour la fourniture de 0,13 % du total des semences dont Haïti a besoin cette année ?

La décision d’introduire des semences hybrides, stériles, se justifie-t-elle entièrement par l’urgence alimentaire ?

N’ouvre-t-elle pas la voie à la conquête progressive du marché haïtien des semences pour une transnationale en quête de nouveaux marchés ?

Au final, cette goutte d’eau qui pourrait passer inaperçue – et qui vient à point nommé pour redorer le blason d’une société critiquée et aux résultats décevants (9) – ne menace-t-elle pas de se transformer en déluge d’ici quelques années ?

  • (1) Les cooptations entre la firme et l’administration publique américaine sont nombreuses. Citons l’ancienne dirigeante de Monsanto, Linda Fischer, qui a été nommée directrice adjointe de l’agence de protection de l’environnement (EPA) en 2003, ou Michael R. Taylor, vice président pour les politiques publiques à Monsanto, qui a été propulsé au lendemain du séisme en Haïti commissaire député à la Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • (2) La multinationale a été condamnée pour pollution des sols, des nappes phréatiques et du sang des populations avec les polychlorobiphényles (PCB) aux Etats-Unis et au Royaume-Uni (Pays de Galles), et pour publicité mensongère quant à la nature soi-disant biodégradable de son désherbant Roundup aux Etats-Unis et en France (condamnée à New York en 1996 et à Lyon en 2008).
  • (3) « Pas de semences OGM en Haiti, selon le ministre de l’agriculture », Alterpresse, 1er mai 2010.
  • (4) « Le futur agricole d’Haïti selon l’américain Monsanto », Rue89, 28 mai 2010.
  • (5) « Aide alimentaire et production nationale : nécessité d’une adéquation », Agropresse, 1er mars 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ…
  • (6) « L’agriculture au service du développement », Rapport 2008 sur le développement dans le monde, publié en octobre 2007.
  • (7) Discours du 10 mars 2010 devant la Commission des affaires étrangères du Sénat américain.
  • (8) RFI, 12 mai 2010. Ministre de l’agriculture en 1997, pendant le premier mandat de M. Préval, M. Maturin tenta une réforme agraire en faveur de la paysannerie, effritée par des alternances dans le gouvernement.
  • (9) Les bénéfices de la firme au premier trimestre 2010 ont accusé une perte de 19 millions de dollars par rapport à la même période l’an passé, marquant un recul de 19% en un an (AFP, 7 avril 2010).


VIDEO: “Le monde selon Monsanto”, Le documentaire événement de Marie-Monique Robin! (109 minutes)
MISE À JOUR:

10 mai 2012 (Haïti Libre) Dans le nouveau cabinet en Haïti, M. Herbert Docteur n’a pas été rappellé à son poste en tant que chef du ministère de l’Agriculture, des Ressources Naturelles et du Développement Rural (MARNDR). Il a été remplacé par l’agronome Jacques Thomas.
Origine: Le Monde Diplomatique, mardi 15 juin 2010

Fertilizers, hybrid seeds, GMO … should I be afraid?

By Edner Son Décime
AlterPresse

P-au-Prince, March 30, 2012 [AlterPresse] — While the authorities want to go through the use of hybrid seeds to modernize Haitian agriculture, doubts are raised about the actual benefits for Haiti, AlterPresse observed.

At the launch of the spring growing season in 2012 to 23 March 2012 Dumay, the Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Herbert, and the project director Winner, Jean-Robert Estime, strongly endorsed the use of tractors, new cultivation techniques, fertilizer and hybrid seed production to support and increase the productivity of Haitian farmers.

“150 tons of hybrid seed will be imported as part of the campaign 2012,” informed the director of Winner.

“The fertilizer will be subsidized up to 33% by the Ministry of Agriculture. It will be more expensive, but of course more available to farmers, “added the minister for his share of agriculture resigned, Dr. Herbert.

Seeds and fertilizers will be regularly available in the shops of agricultural inputs to farmers, they promise.

The specter of increased dependence

According to Minister Dr., hybrids “from the crossing of two varieties of plants and may be used only once. Next year we must buy more. ” Doctor goes on to argue that “they are used in Haiti since 1970 and have a higher return potential seed [natural] local.”

But at what cost? The planter that uses hybrid is forced to buy gold they are not produced in Haiti.

Hybrid seeds are produced by multinational food. The fact that they are not reproducible requires producers to buy these companies at each harvest. Also created a new market for these giants of agribusiness, experts emphasize.

Moreover, hybrid seeds handle without protection such as gloves or masks may have adverse effects on the health of farmers and the environment. Because these seeds are treated with toxic fungicides, herbicides, etc..

Louise Sperling, a researcher of the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) has led a multi-agency study on seed security, told Ayiti Grassroots in March 2011 (media partnership which is a member AlterPresse) that “direct aid seed-when not needed, and practiced repeatedly, is a real prejudice. It undermines local systems, creates dependencies and stifles any real development of the commercial sector. ”

According to the survey conducted by Grassroots Ayiti, approve grants of hybrid seeds is “in direct contradiction with Haitian law and international conventions that protect the gene pool and the ecosystem in general.”

The use of hybrid seeds in “spring 2012 crop year” appears to be properly prepared for the gift of Monsanto, according to an excerpt from an internal report of USAID / Winner received by journalists of Ayiti Grassroots.

“Despite a media campaign against hybrids, under cover of GMO / Agent Orange / Round Up, the seeds were used almost everywhere, the real message got through, although at a level below our expectations [and] we are working as fast as possible with farmers to increase as much as possible the use of hybrid seeds, “says Winner.

However, some agronomists believe that hybrid seeds can be an alternative for Haitian agriculture especially that there are serious problems of yield and decreased soil fertility. Nevertheless the country, or at least the Ministry of Agriculture should have the right technologies and invest systematically in biological research.

What we must be afraid they are not seed itself, the ideological component is hidden behind the facade using that must be denounced, as viewed by other agronomists AlterPresse. This is the commercial logic of multinational enterprises that must be denounced, they said, noting the need to avoid confusion between Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) and hybrid seeds.

A seed plant GMO is an organism whose genetic material has been modified to give it new properties. This change occurs by genetic engineering techniques to introduce other genes from other organisms such as viruses, bacteria, yeast, fungus, plant or animal.

Hybrid seeds are usually obtained by crossing of varieties of plants of the same species. But can not reproduce in the farmer’s field.

The Ministry of Agriculture and GMOs

To the Minister of Agriculture Dr. Herbert resigned, his institution has a scientific position in relation to the issue of GMOs. “If the laboratories tested these products for a sufficiently long to prove they can not kill, we are ready to use them,” he said.

Doctor still remember that the Haitian population consumes GMOs already especially with meat imported from the Dominican Republic. “A turkey leg [imported from the neighboring country of Haiti] is larger than that of a goat. How do you make this possible? , “Argues the minister of agriculture.

Former importer of rice, Doctor believes that “we have prejudices [on GMOs] in Haiti. What we said as rice or corn we eat does not contain GMOs? ”

Doctor anticipates the triumph of the era GMO. “In 50 to 100 years, 90% of the products we consume are of GMO,” he prophesies stressing the need to increase global agricultural production “to meet the galloping increase in world population.”

However, “given the current state, world cultures could feed without problem 12 billion people,” says Jean Ziegler, former Special Rapporteur for the Right to Food Council of Human Rights UN (2000-2008), in his book “Mass Destruction” released in October 2011. [Efd after 03.30.2012 11:00]

Origin: AlterPresse
http://www.alterpresse.org/spip.php?article12615

When Monsanto comes to the aid of Haiti

By Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

Thursday, June 4, 2010 between 8,000 and 12,000 Haitian peasants, supported by twenty local and international organizations, marched in the town of Hinche, in the center of the island, to express their disagreement with the policy of “aid “Government’s agricultural sector. In particular its decision to accept the seeds offered by the agricultural industry giant Monsanto. The transnational has just pledged a donation of 475 tons of seeds, with their arsenal of pesticides and fertilizers. A first shipment has already been distributed in pilot centers and sold “discounted” to farmers. The operation is part of the project Winner (Watershed Initiative for natural resources and environmental), which shoulder almost 10 000 farmers to resume their activity. Launched in 2009, the project is overseen by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

We no longer Monsanto, which manufactured Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War as well as products based on dioxin before converting to agricultural biotechnology. Well represented within the U.S. administration (1), the company is implicated in several cases related to environmental contamination by pollutants, including its herbicides (2). It is also criticized for helping to ruin tens of thousands of farmers in the poorest countries, like India, where the sowers of indebtedness of cotton has led to massive waves of suicide. For its part, the director of operations in Haiti Project Winner is none other than Jean-Robert Estime, who was foreign minister of “life president”, Mr Jean-Claude Duvalier.

Mr. Jean-Yves Urfié, Spiritan Father committed forty years with Haitian peasants, was the first, alerted about the nature of the “generous help” from Monsanto, fearing that such bodies are (GMOs). The Minister of Agriculture, Joanas Gue, is immediately defended himself, assuring taking “every precaution before accepting the offer from Monsanto” (3).

We now know that the seeds offered consist of maize seed “hybrid”, non-transgenic. The expected productivity of these seeds requires use of herbicides and fertilizers well exceeds that required for traditional or indigenous seeds. Furthermore, only the first generation of these seeds is fertile. If the habit is to use them (instead of seeds from previous harvests), then it will buy seeds, fertilizers and herbicides from Monsanto.

One can understand how a seed “super productive” could be welcome in a country lack of food. However, Jean-Pierre Ricot, an economist at the Haitian Advocacy Platform for Alternative Development (PAPDA), believes this is the introduction of a market logic that does not correspond to the peasant culture of of Haiti, “Haitian peasants have traditionally been the ability to produce and reproduce their own seed, organic and local, bound for their families and the local market. Monsanto wants to integrate farmers in a market they do not control for quality and price of seed, [and] make a Haitian peasant assisted rather than a producer. (4) »

Whatever the motivations of the transnational, the choice of such a partnership raises questions about the direction of aid policy and the future of Haitian agriculture. The survival of the peasant population, nearly 70% of the total, depends on this key sector already battered by “U.S. aid” … and that reconstruction could help “rebuild”.

By 1981, the Reagan administration, USAID pressured the Haitian government to substitute exports (cocoa, cotton, essential oils) in food crops. The operation will be facilitated by the provision of food assistance equivalent to U.S. $ 11 million. In 1995, an agreement between former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and U.S. President William Clinton to lift trade barriers, has authorized the “dumping” of U.S. agricultural products (subsidized) on the local market.

Self-sufficient in the 1980s, the Haitian National food production met less than 40% of the demand for local food on the eve of the earthquake. The rest came from imports and international aid (5). A situation that has worsened the consequences of the disaster. The number of people experiencing severe food insecurity rose from 500,000 before the earthquake to more than 2 million today. The number of families with food stocks fell from 44 to 17% and food prices have jumped 25% on average.

The food crisis unprecedented testified that the riots in 2008, had cornered the major players in international aid to recognize their “mistake” and recommend to place agriculture at the center of development policies (6). So Mr. Clinton, Special Envoy to Haiti today to the UN, he apologized to the Haitian people for damage caused by its administration (7). Several specialists, and even some members of Congress have proposed that the United States buy local products for distribution to people rather than send their own agricultural products. In vain. In the present state, Haiti remains one of the largest customers of U.S. rice.

As is concern in the Haitian President René Préval during his meeting with his U.S. counterpart on March 10: “if we continue to send food and water from abroad, it will compete with the production national of Haiti and Haitian trade. ” According to Gerald Maturin, a former agriculture minister who now heads the Regional Coordination of organizations Southeast (CROSE), the reconstruction depends on “the inclusion of the peasantry in the national economy and in life of the nation “(8). It is now claiming not to be ignored in the definition of aid and the implementation of reconstruction projects.

In the context of emergency food, and the approach of the hurricane season, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) promised to send 345,000 tons of seeds by the end of the year. The specifications of the institution provides for the purchase of local seeds and technical support to farmers. While the main actor of public relief shows a strategy consistent with the magnitude of agricultural and food needs of the Haitian people, why use Monsanto for the supply of 0.13% of total seed which Haiti needs this year?

The decision to introduce hybrid seeds, sterile, is justified she entirely by the food emergency? Do not open Does not the way to the gradual conquest of the Haitian market for transnational seed in search of new markets? Ultimately, the drop of water that could go unnoticed – and just in time to restore the reputation of a company and criticized the disappointing results (9) – no threat does not turn into a flood of next few years?

(1) The cooptation between the firm and the U.S. government are numerous. Include the former CEO of Monsanto, Linda Fischer, who was appointed Deputy Director of Protection Agency (EPA) in 2003, and Michael R. Taylor, vice president for public policy at Monsanto, which was propelled in the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti deputy commissioner at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

(2) The multinational has been convicted of soil contamination, ground water and the blood of people with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the U.S. and the UK (Wales), and false advertising about the nature so-called biodegradable weedkiller Roundup of its United States and France (convicted in New York in 1996 and Lyon in 2008).

(3) “No GMO seeds in Haiti, according to Minister of Agriculture,” AlterPresse, May 1, 2010.

(4) “The future of agriculture according to the American Monsanto Haiti”, Rue 89, May 28, 2010.

(5) “Food aid and domestic production: the need for adequacy,” Agropresse, March 1, 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ …

(6) “Agriculture for Development,” 2008 Report on World Development, published in October 2007.

(7) Speech of 10 March 2010 before the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the U.S. Senate.

(8) RFI, May 12, 2010. Minister of Agriculture in 1997, during the first term of Mr. Preval, Mr. Maturin attempted land reform in favor of the peasantry, eroded by alternations in the government.

(9) The profits of the firm in the first quarter of 2010 showed a loss of $ 19 million over the same period last year, marking a decline of 19% in one year (AFP, April 7, 2010).

Origin: Le Monde Diplomatique, Tuesday, June 15, 2010
http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/carnet/2010-06-15-Haiti

Engrais, semences hybrides, Ogm…faut-il avoir peur?

Par Edner Fils Decime
AlterPresse

P-au-P, 30 mars 2012 [AlterPresse] — Alors que les autorités souhaitent passer par l’utilisation des semences hybrides pour moderniser l’agriculture haïtienne, des doutes sont soulevés quant aux bénéfices réels pour Haïti, observe AlterPresse.

Lors du lancement de la campagne agricole de printemps 2012 à Dumay le 23 mars 2012, le ministre de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur, et le directeur du projet Winner, Jean-Robert Estimé, ont vivement soutenu l’utilisation de tracteurs, de nouvelles techniques de cultures, d’engrais et de semences hybrides pour supporter la production et augmenter la productivité des agriculteurs haïtiens.

« 150 tonnes de semences hybrides seront importées dans le cadre de la campagne 2012 », a informé le directeur de Winner.

« Les engrais seront subventionnés à hauteur de 33% par le ministère de l’agriculture. Ce sera plus cher, mais naturellement plus disponible pour les agriculteurs », a ajouté pour sa part le ministre démissionnaire de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur.

Semences et engrais seront régulièrement disponibles dans les boutiques d’intrants agricoles pour les paysans, promettent-ils.

Le spectre de la dépendance renforcée

Selon le ministre Docteur, les hybrides « proviennent du croisement de deux variétés de plantes et ne peuvent être utilisées qu’une seule fois. L’année prochaine il faut en acheter d’autres ». Docteur poursuit en soutenant qu’ « elles sont utilisées en Haïti depuis les années 1970 et possèdent un potentiel de rendement supérieur aux semences [naturelles] locales ».

Mais à quel prix ? Le planteur qui utilise les hybrides est forcé d’en racheter or elles ne sont pas produites en Haïti.

Les semences hybrides sont fabriquées par des multinationales agro-alimentaires. Le fait qu’elles ne sont pas reproductibles oblige les producteurs à en acheter à ces entreprises à chaque récolte. Aussi un nouveau marché se créé pour ces géants de l’agro-alimentaire, soulignent des spécialistes.

De plus, manipuler les semences hybrides sans protection comme des gants ou des masques peut avoir des effets néfastes sur la santé des agriculteurs et sur l’environnement. Car ces semences toxiques sont traitées avec des fongicides, des herbicides, etc.

Louise Sperling, chercheuse du Centre international d’agriculture tropicale (Ciat) ayant dirigé une étude multi-agence sur la sécurité des semences, a déclaré à Ayiti Kale Je en mars 2011 (partenariat médiatique dont AlterPresse est membre) que « l’aide directe en semences –lorsqu’elle n’est pas nécessaire, et pratiquée de manière répétitive –constitue un préjudice réel. Il sape les systèmes locaux, crée des dépendances et étouffe tout véritable développement du secteur commercial ».

Selon l’enquête menée par Ayiti Kale Je, approuver des dons de semences hybrides est « en contradiction directe avec la loi haïtienne et les conventions internationales qui visent à protéger le patrimoine génétique et l’écosystème en général ».

L’utilisation des semences hybrides dans « la campagne agricole printemps 2012 » semble être dûment préparée depuis le don de Monsanto, à en croire un extrait d’un rapport interne de Usaid/Winner obtenu par les journalistes de Ayiti Kale Je.

« Malgré toute une campagne médiatique contre les hybrides, sous couvert d’OGM/Agent Orange/Round Up, ces semences ont été utilisées presque partout, le vrai message est passé, bien qu’à un niveau en deçà de nos espérances [et] nous travaillons actuellement le plus vite possible avec les paysans afin d’augmenter autant que possible l’utilisation des semences hybrides », a écrit Winner.

Toutefois certains agronomes pensent que les semences hybrides peuvent être une alternative pour l’agriculture haïtienne surtout qu’il y a de sérieux problèmes de rendements et une baisse de la fertilité des sols. Néanmoins le pays, ou tout au moins le Ministère de l’agriculture devrait disposer des technologies adéquates et investir systématiquement dans les recherches biologiques.

Ce dont il faut avoir peur ce ne sont pas des semences en soi, c’est le volet idéologique qui est caché derrière la façade aide qu’il faut dénoncer, selon d’autres agronomes consultés par AlterPresse. C’est la logique marchande des entreprises multinationales qu’il faut dénoncer, expliquent-ils, en précisant qu’il faut éviter la confusion entre Organisme génétiquement modifié (Ogm) et semences hybrides.

Une semence ogm est un organisme végétal dont le patrimoine génétique a été modifié afin de lui conférer de nouvelles propriétés. Cette modification s’opère par des techniques de génie génétique pour introduire d’autres gènes provenant d’autres organismes tels virus, bactérie, levure, champignon, plante ou animal.

Les semences hybrides sont généralement obtenues par le croisement de variétés de plantes de la même espèce. Mais ne peuvent pas se reproduire dans le champ du paysan.

Le Ministère de l’agriculture et les Ogm

Pour le ministre de l’agriculture démissionnaire Herbert Docteur, l’institution qu’il dirige a une position scientifique par rapport à la question des Ogm. « Si des laboratoires ont testé ces produits pendant un temps suffisamment long pour prouver qu’ils ne peuvent pas tuer, nous sommes prêts à les utiliser », dit-il.

Docteur rappelle tout de même que la population haïtienne consomme déjà des Ogm surtout avec la viande importée de la République Dominicaine. « Une cuisse de dinde [importée du pays voisin d’Haïti] est plus grosse que celle d’un cabri. Comment voulez-vous que cela soit possible ? », argue le ministre de l’agriculture.

Ancien importateur de riz, Docteur croit que « nous avons des préjugés [sur les Ogm] en Haïti. Qu’est-ce qui nous dit que le riz ou le maïs que nous consommons ne contient pas d’Ogm ? »

Docteur anticipe le triomphe de l’ère Ogm. « Dans 50 à 100 ans, 90% des produits que nous allons consommer seront des Ogm », prophétise-t-il en soulignant la nécessité d’augmenter la production agricole mondiale « pour répondre à l’augmentation galopante de la population mondiale ».

Pourtant, « dans l’état actuel, les cultures mondiales pourraient nourrir sans problème 12 milliards d’êtres humains », relève Jean Ziegler, ancien rapporteur spécial pour le droit à l’alimentation du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’Onu (2000 à 2008), dans son livre « Destruction massive » publié en octobre 2011. [efd apr 30/03/2012 11:00]

Origine: AlterPresse
http://www.alterpresse.org/spip.php?article12615

Quand Monsanto vient au secours d’Haïti

Par Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

Jeudi 4 juin, 2010 entre 8 000 et 12 000 paysans haïtiens, soutenus par une vingtaine d’organisations locales et internationales, manifestaient dans la commune de Hinche, au centre de l’île, pour exprimer leur désaccord avec la politique d’« aide » au secteur agricole du gouvernement. En particulier sa décision d’accepter les semences offertes par le géant de l’industrie agronomique Monsanto. La transnationale vient de promettre un don de 475 tonnes de semences, avec leur arsenal de pesticides et d’engrais. Un premier arrivage a déjà été distribué dans des centres pilotes et vendus « à prix réduit » aux paysans. L’opération s’inscrit dans le cadre du projet Winner (Initiative bassins versants pour les ressources naturelles et environnementales) qui épaule près de 10 000 agriculteurs pour la reprise de leur activité. Lancé en 2009, le projet est supervisé par l’Agence américaine pour le développement international (USAID).

On ne présente plus Monsanto, qui fabriquait l’agent orange utilisé pendant la guerre du Vietnam ainsi que des produits à base de dioxine avant de se convertir aux biotechnologies agricoles. Bien représentée au sein de l’administration américaine (1), l’entreprise se trouve mise en cause dans plusieurs affaires liées à la contamination de l’environnement par des produits polluants, dont ses herbicides (2). Elle est par ailleurs dénoncée pour avoir contribué à ruiner des dizaines de milliers de paysans dans les pays les plus pauvres, comme l’Inde, où le surendettement des semeurs de coton a entraîné des vagues massives de suicide. De son côté, le directeur des opérations en Haïti du projet Winner n’est autre que M. Jean-Robert Estimé, qui fut ministre des affaires étrangères du « président à vie », M. Jean-Claude Duvalier.

M. Jean-Yves Urfié, père spiritain engagé depuis quarante ans auprès des paysans haïtiens, a, le premier, alerté quant à la nature de « l’aide généreuse », de Monsanto, craignant qu’il ne s’agisse d’organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM). Le ministre de l’agriculture, M. Joanas Gué, s’en est immédiatement défendu, assurant avoir pris « toutes les précautions avant d’accepter l’offre de la multinationale Monsanto » (3).

On sait désormais que les semences offertes se composent de semences de maïs dites « hybrides », non transgéniques. La productivité attendue de ces graines nécessite une utilisation d’herbicides et d’engrais bien supérieure à celle nécessaire pour les semences traditionnelles ou autochtones. De plus, seule la première génération de ces semences est fertile. Si l’habitude est prise de les utiliser (à la place des semences tirées des récoltes précédentes), il faudra alors acheter semences, engrais et herbicides auprès de Monsanto.

On peut comprendre comment une semence « super productive » pourrait être la bienvenue dans un pays qui manque de nourriture. Toutefois, M. Jean-Pierre Ricot, économiste à la Plateforme haïtienne de plaidoyer pour un développement alternatif (PAPDA), estime qu’il s’agit de l’introduction d’une logique de marché qui ne correspond pas à la culture paysanne d’Haïti : « Les paysans haïtiens ont traditionnellement la capacité de produire et de reproduire leur propre semence, organique et locale, à destination de leur famille et du marché de proximité. Monsanto veut intégrer les agriculteurs sur un marché qu’ils ne contrôlent pas en matière de qualité de semence et de prix [et] faire du paysan haïtien un assisté plutôt qu’un producteur. (4) »

Quelles que soient les motivations de la transnationale, le choix d’un tel partenariat soulève des interrogations quant à l’orientation de la politique d’aide et à l’avenir de l’agriculture haïtienne. La survie de la population paysanne, près de 70 % du total, dépend de ce secteur-clé déjà malmené par « l’aide américaine »… et que la reconstruction aurait pu aider à « remettre sur pied ».

Dès 1981, sous l’administration Reagan, l’USAID fait pression sur le gouvernement haïtien pour substituer des produits d’exportation (cacao, coton, huiles essentielles) aux cultures vivrières. L’opération sera facilitée par l’octroi d’une aide alimentaire américaine équivalente à 11 millions de dollars. En 1995, un accord passé entre l’ancien président, M. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, et le président américain William Clinton pour lever les barrières douanières, a autorisé le « dumping » des produits agricoles américains (subventionnés) sur le marché local.

Autosuffisante dans les années 1980, la production nationale haïtienne alimentaire satisfaisait moins de 40 % de la demande alimentaire locale à la veille du séisme. Le reste provenait des importations et de l’aide internationale (5). Une situation qui n’a fait qu’aggraver les conséquences de la catastrophe. Le nombre de personnes vivant en situation d’insécurité alimentaire sévère est passé de 500 000 avant le séisme à plus de 2 millions aujourd’hui. Le nombre de familles disposant de stocks de nourriture a chuté de 44 à 17 % et les prix des denrées alimentaires ont bondi de 25 % en moyenne.

La crise alimentaire sans précédant dont témoignèrent les émeutes de la faim en 2008, avait acculé les grands acteurs de l’aide internationale à reconnaître leur « erreur » et recommander de placer l’agriculture au centre des politiques de développement (6). Ainsi M. Clinton, aujourd’hui envoyé spécial pour Haïti à l’ONU, a-t-il présenté ses excuses au peuple haïtien pour les dommages causés par son administration (7). Plusieurs spécialistes, et même certains membres du Congrès américain, ont proposé que les Etats-Unis achètent les productions locales pour les distribuer aux populations plutôt que d’envoyer leurs propres produits agricoles. En vain. Dans l’état actuel, Haïti demeure l’un des tout premiers clients du riz américain.

Comme s’en est inquiété le président Haïtien M. René Préval lors de sa rencontre avec son homologue américain le 10 mars dernier : « si on continue à envoyer de la nourriture et de l’eau de l’étranger, cela va concurrencer la production nationale d’Haïti et le commerce haïtien ». Selon M. Gérald Maturin, ancien ministre de l’agriculture aujourd’hui à la tête de la Coordination régionale des organisations du Sud-Est (CROSE), la reconstruction dépend « de l’inclusion de la paysannerie dans l’économie nationale et dans la vie de la nation » (8). Celle-ci réclame aujourd’hui de ne plus être ignorée dans la définition de l’aide et la mise en place des projets de reconstruction.

Dans le contexte d’urgence alimentaire, et à l’approche de la saison cyclonique, l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) promet l’envoi de 345 000 tonnes de semences d’ici la fin de l’année. Le cahier des charges de l’institution prévoit l’achat de semences locales ainsi que l’appui technique aux paysans. Alors que le principal acteur public de l’aide d’urgence affiche une stratégie d’ampleur cohérente avec les besoins agricoles et alimentaires de la population haïtienne, pourquoi faire appel à Monsanto pour la fourniture de 0,13 % du total des semences dont Haïti a besoin cette année ?

La décision d’introduire des semences hybrides, stériles, se justifie-t-elle entièrement par l’urgence alimentaire ? N’ouvre-t-elle pas la voie à la conquête progressive du marché haïtien des semences pour une transnationale en quête de nouveaux marchés ? Au final, cette goutte d’eau qui pourrait passer inaperçue – et qui vient à point nommé pour redorer le blason d’une société critiquée et aux résultats décevants (9) – ne menace-t-elle pas de se transformer en déluge d’ici quelques années ?

(1) Les cooptations entre la firme et l’administration publique américaine sont nombreuses. Citons l’ancienne dirigeante de Monsanto, Linda Fischer, qui a été nommée directrice adjointe de l’agence de protection de l’environnement (EPA) en 2003, ou Michael R. Taylor, vice président pour les politiques publiques à Monsanto, qui a été propulsé au lendemain du séisme en Haïti commissaire député à la Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

(2) La multinationale a été condamnée pour pollution des sols, des nappes phréatiques et du sang des populations avec les polychlorobiphényles (PCB) aux Etats-Unis et au Royaume-Uni (Pays de Galles), et pour publicité mensongère quant à la nature soi-disant biodégradable de son désherbant Roundup aux Etats-Unis et en France (condamnée à New York en 1996 et à Lyon en 2008).

(3) « Pas de semences OGM en Haiti, selon le ministre de l’agriculture », Alterpresse, 1er mai 2010.

(4) « Le futur agricole d’Haïti selon l’américain Monsanto », Rue89, 28 mai 2010.

(5) « Aide alimentaire et production nationale : nécessité d’une adéquation », Agropresse, 1er mars 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ…

(6) « L’agriculture au service du développement », Rapport 2008 sur le développement dans le monde, publié en octobre 2007.

(7) Discours du 10 mars 2010 devant la Commission des affaires étrangères du Sénat américain.

(8) RFI, 12 mai 2010. Ministre de l’agriculture en 1997, pendant le premier mandat de M. Préval, M. Maturin tenta une réforme agraire en faveur de la paysannerie, effritée par des alternances dans le gouvernement.

(9) Les bénéfices de la firme au premier trimestre 2010 ont accusé une perte de 19 millions de dollars par rapport à la même période l’an passé, marquant un recul de 19% en un an (AFP, 7 avril 2010).

Origine: Le Monde Diplomatique, mardi 15 juin 2010
http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/carnet/2010-06-15-Haiti

Engrais, semences hybrides, Ogm…faut-il avoir peur?

Par Edner Fils Decime
AlterPresse

P-au-P, 30 mars 2012 [AlterPresse] — Alors que les autorités souhaitent passer par l’utilisation des semences hybrides pour moderniser l’agriculture haïtienne, des doutes sont soulevés quant aux bénéfices réels pour Haïti, observe AlterPresse.

Lors du lancement de la campagne agricole de printemps 2012 à Dumay le 23 mars 2012, le ministre de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur, et le directeur du projet Winner, Jean-Robert Estimé, ont vivement soutenu l’utilisation de tracteurs, de nouvelles techniques de cultures, d’engrais et de semences hybrides pour supporter la production et augmenter la productivité des agriculteurs haïtiens.

« 150 tonnes de semences hybrides seront importées dans le cadre de la campagne 2012 », a informé le directeur de Winner.

« Les engrais seront subventionnés à hauteur de 33% par le ministère de l’agriculture. Ce sera plus cher, mais naturellement plus disponible pour les agriculteurs », a ajouté pour sa part le ministre démissionnaire de l’agriculture, Herbert Docteur.

Semences et engrais seront régulièrement disponibles dans les boutiques d’intrants agricoles pour les paysans, promettent-ils.

Le spectre de la dépendance renforcée

Selon le ministre Docteur, les hybrides « proviennent du croisement de deux variétés de plantes et ne peuvent être utilisées qu’une seule fois. L’année prochaine il faut en acheter d’autres ». Docteur poursuit en soutenant qu’ « elles sont utilisées en Haïti depuis les années 1970 et possèdent un potentiel de rendement supérieur aux semences [naturelles] locales ».

Mais à quel prix ? Le planteur qui utilise les hybrides est forcé d’en racheter or elles ne sont pas produites en Haïti.

Les semences hybrides sont fabriquées par des multinationales agro-alimentaires. Le fait qu’elles ne sont pas reproductibles oblige les producteurs à en acheter à ces entreprises à chaque récolte. Aussi un nouveau marché se créé pour ces géants de l’agro-alimentaire, soulignent des spécialistes.

De plus, manipuler les semences hybrides sans protection comme des gants ou des masques peut avoir des effets néfastes sur la santé des agriculteurs et sur l’environnement. Car ces semences toxiques sont traitées avec des fongicides, des herbicides, etc.

Louise Sperling, chercheuse du Centre international d’agriculture tropicale (Ciat) ayant dirigé une étude multi-agence sur la sécurité des semences, a déclaré à Ayiti Kale Je en mars 2011 (partenariat médiatique dont AlterPresse est membre) que « l’aide directe en semences –lorsqu’elle n’est pas nécessaire, et pratiquée de manière répétitive –constitue un préjudice réel. Il sape les systèmes locaux, crée des dépendances et étouffe tout véritable développement du secteur commercial ».

Selon l’enquête menée par Ayiti Kale Je, approuver des dons de semences hybrides est « en contradiction directe avec la loi haïtienne et les conventions internationales qui visent à protéger le patrimoine génétique et l’écosystème en général ».

L’utilisation des semences hybrides dans « la campagne agricole printemps 2012 » semble être dûment préparée depuis le don de Monsanto, à en croire un extrait d’un rapport interne de Usaid/Winner obtenu par les journalistes de Ayiti Kale Je.

« Malgré toute une campagne médiatique contre les hybrides, sous couvert d’OGM/Agent Orange/Round Up, ces semences ont été utilisées presque partout, le vrai message est passé, bien qu’à un niveau en deçà de nos espérances [et] nous travaillons actuellement le plus vite possible avec les paysans afin d’augmenter autant que possible l’utilisation des semences hybrides », a écrit Winner.

Toutefois certains agronomes pensent que les semences hybrides peuvent être une alternative pour l’agriculture haïtienne surtout qu’il y a de sérieux problèmes de rendements et une baisse de la fertilité des sols. Néanmoins le pays, ou tout au moins le Ministère de l’agriculture devrait disposer des technologies adéquates et investir systématiquement dans les recherches biologiques.

Ce dont il faut avoir peur ce ne sont pas des semences en soi, c’est le volet idéologique qui est caché derrière la façade aide qu’il faut dénoncer, selon d’autres agronomes consultés par AlterPresse. C’est la logique marchande des entreprises multinationales qu’il faut dénoncer, expliquent-ils, en précisant qu’il faut éviter la confusion entre Organisme génétiquement modifié (Ogm) et semences hybrides.

Une semence ogm est un organisme végétal dont le patrimoine génétique a été modifié afin de lui conférer de nouvelles propriétés. Cette modification s’opère par des techniques de génie génétique pour introduire d’autres gènes provenant d’autres organismes tels virus, bactérie, levure, champignon, plante ou animal.

Les semences hybrides sont généralement obtenues par le croisement de variétés de plantes de la même espèce. Mais ne peuvent pas se reproduire dans le champ du paysan.

Le Ministère de l’agriculture et les Ogm

Pour le ministre de l’agriculture démissionnaire Herbert Docteur, l’institution qu’il dirige a une position scientifique par rapport à la question des Ogm. « Si des laboratoires ont testé ces produits pendant un temps suffisamment long pour prouver qu’ils ne peuvent pas tuer, nous sommes prêts à les utiliser », dit-il.

Docteur rappelle tout de même que la population haïtienne consomme déjà des Ogm surtout avec la viande importée de la République Dominicaine. « Une cuisse de dinde [importée du pays voisin d’Haïti] est plus grosse que celle d’un cabri. Comment voulez-vous que cela soit possible ? », argue le ministre de l’agriculture.

Ancien importateur de riz, Docteur croit que « nous avons des préjugés [sur les Ogm] en Haïti. Qu’est-ce qui nous dit que le riz ou le maïs que nous consommons ne contient pas d’Ogm ? »

Docteur anticipe le triomphe de l’ère Ogm. « Dans 50 à 100 ans, 90% des produits que nous allons consommer seront des Ogm », prophétise-t-il en soulignant la nécessité d’augmenter la production agricole mondiale « pour répondre à l’augmentation galopante de la population mondiale ».

Pourtant, « dans l’état actuel, les cultures mondiales pourraient nourrir sans problème 12 milliards d’êtres humains », relève Jean Ziegler, ancien rapporteur spécial pour le droit à l’alimentation du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’Onu (2000 à 2008), dans son livre « Destruction massive » publié en octobre 2011. [efd apr 30/03/2012 11:00]

Origine: AlterPresse
http://www.alterpresse.org/spip.php?article12615

Quand Monsanto vient au secours d’Haïti

Par Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

Jeudi 4 juin, 2010 entre 8 000 et 12 000 paysans haïtiens, soutenus par une vingtaine d’organisations locales et internationales, manifestaient dans la commune de Hinche, au centre de l’île, pour exprimer leur désaccord avec la politique d’« aide » au secteur agricole du gouvernement. En particulier sa décision d’accepter les semences offertes par le géant de l’industrie agronomique Monsanto. La transnationale vient de promettre un don de 475 tonnes de semences, avec leur arsenal de pesticides et d’engrais. Un premier arrivage a déjà été distribué dans des centres pilotes et vendus « à prix réduit » aux paysans. L’opération s’inscrit dans le cadre du projet Winner (Initiative bassins versants pour les ressources naturelles et environnementales) qui épaule près de 10 000 agriculteurs pour la reprise de leur activité. Lancé en 2009, le projet est supervisé par l’Agence américaine pour le développement international (USAID).

On ne présente plus Monsanto, qui fabriquait l’agent orange utilisé pendant la guerre du Vietnam ainsi que des produits à base de dioxine avant de se convertir aux biotechnologies agricoles. Bien représentée au sein de l’administration américaine (1), l’entreprise se trouve mise en cause dans plusieurs affaires liées à la contamination de l’environnement par des produits polluants, dont ses herbicides (2). Elle est par ailleurs dénoncée pour avoir contribué à ruiner des dizaines de milliers de paysans dans les pays les plus pauvres, comme l’Inde, où le surendettement des semeurs de coton a entraîné des vagues massives de suicide. De son côté, le directeur des opérations en Haïti du projet Winner n’est autre que M. Jean-Robert Estimé, qui fut ministre des affaires étrangères du « président à vie », M. Jean-Claude Duvalier.

M. Jean-Yves Urfié, père spiritain engagé depuis quarante ans auprès des paysans haïtiens, a, le premier, alerté quant à la nature de « l’aide généreuse », de Monsanto, craignant qu’il ne s’agisse d’organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM). Le ministre de l’agriculture, M. Joanas Gué, s’en est immédiatement défendu, assurant avoir pris « toutes les précautions avant d’accepter l’offre de la multinationale Monsanto » (3).

On sait désormais que les semences offertes se composent de semences de maïs dites « hybrides », non transgéniques. La productivité attendue de ces graines nécessite une utilisation d’herbicides et d’engrais bien supérieure à celle nécessaire pour les semences traditionnelles ou autochtones. De plus, seule la première génération de ces semences est fertile. Si l’habitude est prise de les utiliser (à la place des semences tirées des récoltes précédentes), il faudra alors acheter semences, engrais et herbicides auprès de Monsanto.

On peut comprendre comment une semence « super productive » pourrait être la bienvenue dans un pays qui manque de nourriture. Toutefois, M. Jean-Pierre Ricot, économiste à la Plateforme haïtienne de plaidoyer pour un développement alternatif (PAPDA), estime qu’il s’agit de l’introduction d’une logique de marché qui ne correspond pas à la culture paysanne d’Haïti : « Les paysans haïtiens ont traditionnellement la capacité de produire et de reproduire leur propre semence, organique et locale, à destination de leur famille et du marché de proximité. Monsanto veut intégrer les agriculteurs sur un marché qu’ils ne contrôlent pas en matière de qualité de semence et de prix [et] faire du paysan haïtien un assisté plutôt qu’un producteur. (4) »

Quelles que soient les motivations de la transnationale, le choix d’un tel partenariat soulève des interrogations quant à l’orientation de la politique d’aide et à l’avenir de l’agriculture haïtienne. La survie de la population paysanne, près de 70 % du total, dépend de ce secteur-clé déjà malmené par « l’aide américaine »… et que la reconstruction aurait pu aider à « remettre sur pied ».

Dès 1981, sous l’administration Reagan, l’USAID fait pression sur le gouvernement haïtien pour substituer des produits d’exportation (cacao, coton, huiles essentielles) aux cultures vivrières. L’opération sera facilitée par l’octroi d’une aide alimentaire américaine équivalente à 11 millions de dollars. En 1995, un accord passé entre l’ancien président, M. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, et le président américain William Clinton pour lever les barrières douanières, a autorisé le « dumping » des produits agricoles américains (subventionnés) sur le marché local.

Autosuffisante dans les années 1980, la production nationale haïtienne alimentaire satisfaisait moins de 40 % de la demande alimentaire locale à la veille du séisme. Le reste provenait des importations et de l’aide internationale (5). Une situation qui n’a fait qu’aggraver les conséquences de la catastrophe. Le nombre de personnes vivant en situation d’insécurité alimentaire sévère est passé de 500 000 avant le séisme à plus de 2 millions aujourd’hui. Le nombre de familles disposant de stocks de nourriture a chuté de 44 à 17 % et les prix des denrées alimentaires ont bondi de 25 % en moyenne.

La crise alimentaire sans précédant dont témoignèrent les émeutes de la faim en 2008, avait acculé les grands acteurs de l’aide internationale à reconnaître leur « erreur » et recommander de placer l’agriculture au centre des politiques de développement (6). Ainsi M. Clinton, aujourd’hui envoyé spécial pour Haïti à l’ONU, a-t-il présenté ses excuses au peuple haïtien pour les dommages causés par son administration (7). Plusieurs spécialistes, et même certains membres du Congrès américain, ont proposé que les Etats-Unis achètent les productions locales pour les distribuer aux populations plutôt que d’envoyer leurs propres produits agricoles. En vain. Dans l’état actuel, Haïti demeure l’un des tout premiers clients du riz américain.

Comme s’en est inquiété le président Haïtien M. René Préval lors de sa rencontre avec son homologue américain le 10 mars dernier : « si on continue à envoyer de la nourriture et de l’eau de l’étranger, cela va concurrencer la production nationale d’Haïti et le commerce haïtien ». Selon M. Gérald Maturin, ancien ministre de l’agriculture aujourd’hui à la tête de la Coordination régionale des organisations du Sud-Est (CROSE), la reconstruction dépend « de l’inclusion de la paysannerie dans l’économie nationale et dans la vie de la nation » (8). Celle-ci réclame aujourd’hui de ne plus être ignorée dans la définition de l’aide et la mise en place des projets de reconstruction.

Dans le contexte d’urgence alimentaire, et à l’approche de la saison cyclonique, l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) promet l’envoi de 345 000 tonnes de semences d’ici la fin de l’année. Le cahier des charges de l’institution prévoit l’achat de semences locales ainsi que l’appui technique aux paysans. Alors que le principal acteur public de l’aide d’urgence affiche une stratégie d’ampleur cohérente avec les besoins agricoles et alimentaires de la population haïtienne, pourquoi faire appel à Monsanto pour la fourniture de 0,13 % du total des semences dont Haïti a besoin cette année ?

La décision d’introduire des semences hybrides, stériles, se justifie-t-elle entièrement par l’urgence alimentaire ? N’ouvre-t-elle pas la voie à la conquête progressive du marché haïtien des semences pour une transnationale en quête de nouveaux marchés ? Au final, cette goutte d’eau qui pourrait passer inaperçue – et qui vient à point nommé pour redorer le blason d’une société critiquée et aux résultats décevants (9) – ne menace-t-elle pas de se transformer en déluge d’ici quelques années ?

(1) Les cooptations entre la firme et l’administration publique américaine sont nombreuses. Citons l’ancienne dirigeante de Monsanto, Linda Fischer, qui a été nommée directrice adjointe de l’agence de protection de l’environnement (EPA) en 2003, ou Michael R. Taylor, vice président pour les politiques publiques à Monsanto, qui a été propulsé au lendemain du séisme en Haïti commissaire député à la Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

(2) La multinationale a été condamnée pour pollution des sols, des nappes phréatiques et du sang des populations avec les polychlorobiphényles (PCB) aux Etats-Unis et au Royaume-Uni (Pays de Galles), et pour publicité mensongère quant à la nature soi-disant biodégradable de son désherbant Roundup aux Etats-Unis et en France (condamnée à New York en 1996 et à Lyon en 2008).

(3) « Pas de semences OGM en Haiti, selon le ministre de l’agriculture », Alterpresse, 1er mai 2010.

(4) « Le futur agricole d’Haïti selon l’américain Monsanto », Rue89, 28 mai 2010.

(5) « Aide alimentaire et production nationale : nécessité d’une adéquation », Agropresse, 1er mars 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ…

(6) « L’agriculture au service du développement », Rapport 2008 sur le développement dans le monde, publié en octobre 2007.

(7) Discours du 10 mars 2010 devant la Commission des affaires étrangères du Sénat américain.

(8) RFI, 12 mai 2010. Ministre de l’agriculture en 1997, pendant le premier mandat de M. Préval, M. Maturin tenta une réforme agraire en faveur de la paysannerie, effritée par des alternances dans le gouvernement.

(9) Les bénéfices de la firme au premier trimestre 2010 ont accusé une perte de 19 millions de dollars par rapport à la même période l’an passé, marquant un recul de 19% en un an (AFP, 7 avril 2010).

Origine: Le Monde Diplomatique, mardi 15 juin 2010
http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/carnet/2010-06-15-Haiti

Fertilizers, hybrid seeds, GMO … should I be afraid?

By Edner Son Décime
AlterPresse

P-au-Prince, March 30, 2012 [AlterPresse] — While the authorities want to go through the use of hybrid seeds to modernize Haitian agriculture, doubts are raised about the actual benefits for Haiti, AlterPresse observed.

At the launch of the spring growing season in 2012 to 23 March 2012 Dumay, the Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Herbert, and the project director Winner, Jean-Robert Estime, strongly endorsed the use of tractors, new cultivation techniques, fertilizer and hybrid seed production to support and increase the productivity of Haitian farmers.

“150 tons of hybrid seed will be imported as part of the campaign 2012,” informed the director of Winner.

“The fertilizer will be subsidized up to 33% by the Ministry of Agriculture. It will be more expensive, but of course more available to farmers, “added the minister for his share of agriculture resigned, Dr. Herbert.

Seeds and fertilizers will be regularly available in the shops of agricultural inputs to farmers, they promise.

The specter of increased dependence

According to Minister Dr., hybrids “from the crossing of two varieties of plants and may be used only once. Next year we must buy more. ” Doctor goes on to argue that “they are used in Haiti since 1970 and have a higher return potential seed [natural] local.”

But at what cost? The planter that uses hybrid is forced to buy gold they are not produced in Haiti.

Hybrid seeds are produced by multinational food. The fact that they are not reproducible requires producers to buy these companies at each harvest. Also created a new market for these giants of agribusiness, experts emphasize.

Moreover, hybrid seeds handle without protection such as gloves or masks may have adverse effects on the health of farmers and the environment. Because these seeds are treated with toxic fungicides, herbicides, etc..

Louise Sperling, a researcher of the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) has led a multi-agency study on seed security, told Ayiti Grassroots in March 2011 (media partnership which is a member AlterPresse) that “direct aid seed-when not needed, and practiced repeatedly, is a real prejudice. It undermines local systems, creates dependencies and stifles any real development of the commercial sector. ”

According to the survey conducted by Grassroots Ayiti, approve grants of hybrid seeds is “in direct contradiction with Haitian law and international conventions that protect the gene pool and the ecosystem in general.”

The use of hybrid seeds in “spring 2012 crop year” appears to be properly prepared for the gift of Monsanto, according to an excerpt from an internal report of USAID / Winner received by journalists of Ayiti Grassroots.

“Despite a media campaign against hybrids, under cover of GMO / Agent Orange / Round Up, the seeds were used almost everywhere, the real message got through, although at a level below our expectations [and] we are working as fast as possible with farmers to increase as much as possible the use of hybrid seeds, “says Winner.

However, some agronomists believe that hybrid seeds can be an alternative for Haitian agriculture especially that there are serious problems of yield and decreased soil fertility. Nevertheless the country, or at least the Ministry of Agriculture should have the right technologies and invest systematically in biological research.

What we must be afraid they are not seed itself, the ideological component is hidden behind the facade using that must be denounced, as viewed by other agronomists AlterPresse. This is the commercial logic of multinational enterprises that must be denounced, they said, noting the need to avoid confusion between Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) and hybrid seeds.

A seed plant GMO is an organism whose genetic material has been modified to give it new properties. This change occurs by genetic engineering techniques to introduce other genes from other organisms such as viruses, bacteria, yeast, fungus, plant or animal.

Hybrid seeds are usually obtained by crossing of varieties of plants of the same species. But can not reproduce in the farmer’s field.

The Ministry of Agriculture and GMOs

To the Minister of Agriculture Dr. Herbert resigned, his institution has a scientific position in relation to the issue of GMOs. “If the laboratories tested these products for a sufficiently long to prove they can not kill, we are ready to use them,” he said.

Doctor still remember that the Haitian population consumes GMOs already especially with meat imported from the Dominican Republic. “A turkey leg [imported from the neighboring country of Haiti] is larger than that of a goat. How do you make this possible? , “Argues the minister of agriculture.

Former importer of rice, Doctor believes that “we have prejudices [on GMOs] in Haiti. What we said as rice or corn we eat does not contain GMOs? ”

Doctor anticipates the triumph of the era GMO. “In 50 to 100 years, 90% of the products we consume are of GMO,” he prophesies stressing the need to increase global agricultural production “to meet the galloping increase in world population.”

However, “given the current state, world cultures could feed without problem 12 billion people,” says Jean Ziegler, former Special Rapporteur for the Right to Food Council of Human Rights UN (2000-2008), in his book “Mass Destruction” released in October 2011. [Efd after 03.30.2012 11:00]

Origin: AlterPresse
http://www.alterpresse.org/spip.php?article12615

When Monsanto comes to the aid of Haiti

By Benjamin Fernandez
Le Monde Diplomatique

Thursday, June 4, 2010 between 8,000 and 12,000 Haitian peasants, supported by twenty local and international organizations, marched in the town of Hinche, in the center of the island, to express their disagreement with the policy of “aid “Government’s agricultural sector. In particular its decision to accept the seeds offered by the agricultural industry giant Monsanto. The transnational has just pledged a donation of 475 tons of seeds, with their arsenal of pesticides and fertilizers. A first shipment has already been distributed in pilot centers and sold “discounted” to farmers. The operation is part of the project Winner (Watershed Initiative for natural resources and environmental), which shoulder almost 10 000 farmers to resume their activity. Launched in 2009, the project is overseen by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

We no longer Monsanto, which manufactured Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War as well as products based on dioxin before converting to agricultural biotechnology. Well represented within the U.S. administration (1), the company is implicated in several cases related to environmental contamination by pollutants, including its herbicides (2). It is also criticized for helping to ruin tens of thousands of farmers in the poorest countries, like India, where the sowers of indebtedness of cotton has led to massive waves of suicide. For its part, the director of operations in Haiti Project Winner is none other than Jean-Robert Estime, who was foreign minister of “life president”, Mr Jean-Claude Duvalier.

Mr. Jean-Yves Urfié, Spiritan Father committed forty years with Haitian peasants, was the first, alerted about the nature of the “generous help” from Monsanto, fearing that such bodies are (GMOs). The Minister of Agriculture, Joanas Gue, is immediately defended himself, assuring taking “every precaution before accepting the offer from Monsanto” (3).

We now know that the seeds offered consist of maize seed “hybrid”, non-transgenic. The expected productivity of these seeds requires use of herbicides and fertilizers well exceeds that required for traditional or indigenous seeds. Furthermore, only the first generation of these seeds is fertile. If the habit is to use them (instead of seeds from previous harvests), then it will buy seeds, fertilizers and herbicides from Monsanto.

One can understand how a seed “super productive” could be welcome in a country lack of food. However, Jean-Pierre Ricot, an economist at the Haitian Advocacy Platform for Alternative Development (PAPDA), believes this is the introduction of a market logic that does not correspond to the peasant culture of of Haiti, “Haitian peasants have traditionally been the ability to produce and reproduce their own seed, organic and local, bound for their families and the local market. Monsanto wants to integrate farmers in a market they do not control for quality and price of seed, [and] make a Haitian peasant assisted rather than a producer. (4) »

Whatever the motivations of the transnational, the choice of such a partnership raises questions about the direction of aid policy and the future of Haitian agriculture. The survival of the peasant population, nearly 70% of the total, depends on this key sector already battered by “U.S. aid” … and that reconstruction could help “rebuild”.

By 1981, the Reagan administration, USAID pressured the Haitian government to substitute exports (cocoa, cotton, essential oils) in food crops. The operation will be facilitated by the provision of food assistance equivalent to U.S. $ 11 million. In 1995, an agreement between former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and U.S. President William Clinton to lift trade barriers, has authorized the “dumping” of U.S. agricultural products (subsidized) on the local market.

Self-sufficient in the 1980s, the Haitian National food production met less than 40% of the demand for local food on the eve of the earthquake. The rest came from imports and international aid (5). A situation that has worsened the consequences of the disaster. The number of people experiencing severe food insecurity rose from 500,000 before the earthquake to more than 2 million today. The number of families with food stocks fell from 44 to 17% and food prices have jumped 25% on average.

The food crisis unprecedented testified that the riots in 2008, had cornered the major players in international aid to recognize their “mistake” and recommend to place agriculture at the center of development policies (6). So Mr. Clinton, Special Envoy to Haiti today to the UN, he apologized to the Haitian people for damage caused by its administration (7). Several specialists, and even some members of Congress have proposed that the United States buy local products for distribution to people rather than send their own agricultural products. In vain. In the present state, Haiti remains one of the largest customers of U.S. rice.

As is concern in the Haitian President René Préval during his meeting with his U.S. counterpart on March 10: “if we continue to send food and water from abroad, it will compete with the production national of Haiti and Haitian trade. ” According to Gerald Maturin, a former agriculture minister who now heads the Regional Coordination of organizations Southeast (CROSE), the reconstruction depends on “the inclusion of the peasantry in the national economy and in life of the nation “(8). It is now claiming not to be ignored in the definition of aid and the implementation of reconstruction projects.

In the context of emergency food, and the approach of the hurricane season, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) promised to send 345,000 tons of seeds by the end of the year. The specifications of the institution provides for the purchase of local seeds and technical support to farmers. While the main actor of public relief shows a strategy consistent with the magnitude of agricultural and food needs of the Haitian people, why use Monsanto for the supply of 0.13% of total seed which Haiti needs this year?

The decision to introduce hybrid seeds, sterile, is justified she entirely by the food emergency? Do not open Does not the way to the gradual conquest of the Haitian market for transnational seed in search of new markets? Ultimately, the drop of water that could go unnoticed – and just in time to restore the reputation of a company and criticized the disappointing results (9) – no threat does not turn into a flood of next few years?

(1) The cooptation between the firm and the U.S. government are numerous. Include the former CEO of Monsanto, Linda Fischer, who was appointed Deputy Director of Protection Agency (EPA) in 2003, and Michael R. Taylor, vice president for public policy at Monsanto, which was propelled in the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti deputy commissioner at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

(2) The multinational has been convicted of soil contamination, ground water and the blood of people with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the U.S. and the UK (Wales), and false advertising about the nature so-called biodegradable weedkiller Roundup of its United States and France (convicted in New York in 1996 and Lyon in 2008).

(3) “No GMO seeds in Haiti, according to Minister of Agriculture,” AlterPresse, May 1, 2010.

(4) “The future of agriculture according to the American Monsanto Haiti”, Rue 89, May 28, 2010.

(5) “Food aid and domestic production: the need for adequacy,” Agropresse, March 1, 2010. http://www.agropressehaiti.org/publ …

(6) “Agriculture for Development,” 2008 Report on World Development, published in October 2007.

(7) Speech of 10 March 2010 before the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the U.S. Senate.

(8) RFI, May 12, 2010. Minister of Agriculture in 1997, during the first term of Mr. Preval, Mr. Maturin attempted land reform in favor of the peasantry, eroded by alternations in the government.

(9) The profits of the firm in the first quarter of 2010 showed a loss of $ 19 million over the same period last year, marking a decline of 19% in one year (AFP, April 7, 2010).

Origin: Le Monde Diplomatique, Tuesday, June 15, 2010
http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/carnet/2010-06-15-Haiti

2 comments on “Poison Seeds, Herbicides, Pushed Again on Haitian Farmers | Des semences empoisonnées et des herbicides encore forcées sur les paysans haïtiens

  1. greetings brother and sister?

  2. Beryl Bery on said:

    I desired to let you know the amount I recognize all you have talked about to help increase the lives of people during this design. By your personal content, we’ve gone out of just an amateur to some specialist inside the place. It’s truly a tribute towards your endeavours. Thank you

Leave a Reply