Mother’s U.S. Citizenship Disqualifies Islamist Presidential Hopeful in Egypt

Hazem Salah Abu Ismail says maternal citizenship controversy US conspiracy

By Staff
Egypt Independent

In a press conference inside a mosque Saturday evening, conversative preacher and presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail attempted to remain in the presidential race, denying official statements that said his mother had US citizenship, saying the evidence was “an American forgery.”

File photo of Islamic presidential hopeful Hazem abu Ismail (Photo credit: Mohamed Al Garnousy).

“There is a clear American intent to exert influence on the office of the president,”

Abu Ismail said to a crowd of supporters at the Assad ibn Furat mosque.

“It is unacceptable that the fate of the Egyptian president should be dependent on papers from America or Israel.”

But Abu Ismail admitted there’s a possibility his mother might have at one point applied for citizenship.

“She may have presented an application for citizenship, but it did not happen,” he said.

In a statement, the Presidential Elections Commission said that it received documents from Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirming that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, obtained American nationality on 25 October 2006.

The Ministry provided the Presidential Elections Commission with a photocopy of the application submitted by Nour requesting to get the American nationality.

Earlier on Saturday, Al-Masry Al-Youm quoted anonymous judicial sources as saying that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had told the Presidential Elections Commission that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, had been a US citizen.

According to a law issued after the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak, presidential candidates, their spouses and parents should hold Egyptian citizenship only.

On Friday, thousands of Abu Ismail supporters protested in Tahrir Square against what they said was a plot to prevent him from running in the elections.

Last week, the Immigration Department at the Ministry of Interior informed the Presidential Elections Commission that Abu Ismail’s mother entered Egypt several times in 2008 and 2009 with her US passport.

Abu Ismail will be able to appeal the decision after 8 April, the date set for announcing the final list of presidential candidates who will run in the elections on 23 May.

In recent weeks, Abu Ismail’s campaign posters have appeared on walls throughout the city, far outnumbering those of any other candidates. He enjoys wide popularity and many commentators believed him to be the front runner in the first presidential elections after Mubarak.

Ismail advocates for the establishment of an Islamist state that applies Sharia. Supporters say they back Abu Ismail because they believe he will cleanse the country of corrupt officials who squandered the country’s wealth.

Had Ismail not been disqualified by his mother’s American citizenship, he would have gone on to face the other notable Islamist candidates in the race, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Khairat al-Shater and the moderate Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh.

 

Source: Egypt Independent

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Egypt in Final Stage of Parliamentary Elections | Egypt Forms Parliament

Hazem Salah Abu Ismail says maternal citizenship controversy US conspiracy

By Staff
Egypt Independent

In a press conference inside a mosque Saturday evening, conversative preacher and presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail attempted to remain in the presidential race, denying official statements that said his mother had US citizenship, saying the evidence was “an American forgery.”

File photo of Islamic presidential hopeful Hazem abu Ismail (Photo credit: Mohamed Al Garnousy).

“There is a clear American intent to exert influence on the office of the president,”

Abu Ismail said to a crowd of supporters at the Assad ibn Furat mosque.

“It is unacceptable that the fate of the Egyptian president should be dependent on papers from America or Israel.”

But Abu Ismail admitted there’s a possibility his mother might have at one point applied for citizenship.

“She may have presented an application for citizenship, but it did not happen,” he said.

In a statement, the Presidential Elections Commission said that it received documents from Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirming that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, obtained American nationality on 25 October 2006.

The Ministry provided the Presidential Elections Commission with a photocopy of the application submitted by Nour requesting to get the American nationality.

Earlier on Saturday, Al-Masry Al-Youm quoted anonymous judicial sources as saying that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had told the Presidential Elections Commission that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, had been a US citizen.

According to a law issued after the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak, presidential candidates, their spouses and parents should hold Egyptian citizenship only.

On Friday, thousands of Abu Ismail supporters protested in Tahrir Square against what they said was a plot to prevent him from running in the elections.

Last week, the Immigration Department at the Ministry of Interior informed the Presidential Elections Commission that Abu Ismail’s mother entered Egypt several times in 2008 and 2009 with her US passport.

Abu Ismail will be able to appeal the decision after 8 April, the date set for announcing the final list of presidential candidates who will run in the elections on 23 May.

In recent weeks, Abu Ismail’s campaign posters have appeared on walls throughout the city, far outnumbering those of any other candidates. He enjoys wide popularity and many commentators believed him to be the front runner in the first presidential elections after Mubarak.

Ismail advocates for the establishment of an Islamist state that applies Sharia. Supporters say they back Abu Ismail because they believe he will cleanse the country of corrupt officials who squandered the country’s wealth.

Had Ismail not been disqualified by his mother’s American citizenship, he would have gone on to face the other notable Islamist candidates in the race, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Khairat al-Shater and the moderate Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh.

 

Source: Egypt Independent

 

Hazem Salah Abu Ismail says maternal citizenship controversy US conspiracy

By Staff
Egypt Independent

In a press conference inside a mosque Saturday evening, conversative preacher and presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail attempted to remain in the presidential race, denying official statements that said his mother had US citizenship, saying the evidence was “an American forgery.”

File photo of Islamic presidential hopeful Hazem abu Ismail (Photo credit: Mohamed Al Garnousy).

“There is a clear American intent to exert influence on the office of the president,”

Abu Ismail said to a crowd of supporters at the Assad ibn Furat mosque.

“It is unacceptable that the fate of the Egyptian president should be dependent on papers from America or Israel.”

But Abu Ismail admitted there’s a possibility his mother might have at one point applied for citizenship.

“She may have presented an application for citizenship, but it did not happen,” he said.

In a statement, the Presidential Elections Commission said that it received documents from Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirming that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, obtained American nationality on 25 October 2006.

The Ministry provided the Presidential Elections Commission with a photocopy of the application submitted by Nour requesting to get the American nationality.

Earlier on Saturday, Al-Masry Al-Youm quoted anonymous judicial sources as saying that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had told the Presidential Elections Commission that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, had been a US citizen.

According to a law issued after the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak, presidential candidates, their spouses and parents should hold Egyptian citizenship only.

On Friday, thousands of Abu Ismail supporters protested in Tahrir Square against what they said was a plot to prevent him from running in the elections.

Last week, the Immigration Department at the Ministry of Interior informed the Presidential Elections Commission that Abu Ismail’s mother entered Egypt several times in 2008 and 2009 with her US passport.

Abu Ismail will be able to appeal the decision after 8 April, the date set for announcing the final list of presidential candidates who will run in the elections on 23 May.

In recent weeks, Abu Ismail’s campaign posters have appeared on walls throughout the city, far outnumbering those of any other candidates. He enjoys wide popularity and many commentators believed him to be the front runner in the first presidential elections after Mubarak.

Ismail advocates for the establishment of an Islamist state that applies Sharia. Supporters say they back Abu Ismail because they believe he will cleanse the country of corrupt officials who squandered the country’s wealth.

Had Ismail not been disqualified by his mother’s American citizenship, he would have gone on to face the other notable Islamist candidates in the race, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Khairat al-Shater and the moderate Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh.

 

Source: Egypt Independent

 

Hazem Salah Abu Ismail says maternal citizenship controversy US conspiracy

By Staff
Egypt Independent

In a press conference inside a mosque Saturday evening, conversative preacher and presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail attempted to remain in the presidential race, denying official statements that said his mother had US citizenship, saying the evidence was “an American forgery.”

File photo of Islamic presidential hopeful Hazem abu Ismail (Photo credit: Mohamed Al Garnousy).

“There is a clear American intent to exert influence on the office of the president,”

Abu Ismail said to a crowd of supporters at the Assad ibn Furat mosque.

“It is unacceptable that the fate of the Egyptian president should be dependent on papers from America or Israel.”

But Abu Ismail admitted there’s a possibility his mother might have at one point applied for citizenship.

“She may have presented an application for citizenship, but it did not happen,” he said.

In a statement, the Presidential Elections Commission said that it received documents from Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirming that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, obtained American nationality on 25 October 2006.

The Ministry provided the Presidential Elections Commission with a photocopy of the application submitted by Nour requesting to get the American nationality.

Earlier on Saturday, Al-Masry Al-Youm quoted anonymous judicial sources as saying that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had told the Presidential Elections Commission that Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, Abu Ismail’s late mother, had been a US citizen.

According to a law issued after the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak, presidential candidates, their spouses and parents should hold Egyptian citizenship only.

On Friday, thousands of Abu Ismail supporters protested in Tahrir Square against what they said was a plot to prevent him from running in the elections.

Last week, the Immigration Department at the Ministry of Interior informed the Presidential Elections Commission that Abu Ismail’s mother entered Egypt several times in 2008 and 2009 with her US passport.

Abu Ismail will be able to appeal the decision after 8 April, the date set for announcing the final list of presidential candidates who will run in the elections on 23 May.

In recent weeks, Abu Ismail’s campaign posters have appeared on walls throughout the city, far outnumbering those of any other candidates. He enjoys wide popularity and many commentators believed him to be the front runner in the first presidential elections after Mubarak.

Ismail advocates for the establishment of an Islamist state that applies Sharia. Supporters say they back Abu Ismail because they believe he will cleanse the country of corrupt officials who squandered the country’s wealth.

Had Ismail not been disqualified by his mother’s American citizenship, he would have gone on to face the other notable Islamist candidates in the race, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Khairat al-Shater and the moderate Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh.

 

Source: Egypt Independent

Dady Chery

About Dady Chery

Dr. Dady Chery is a Haitian-born journalist, playwright, essayist, and poet. She is the author of "We Have Dared to Be Free: Haiti's Struggle Against Occupation." Her broad interests encompass science, culture, and human rights. She writes extensively about Haiti and world issues such as climate change and social justice. Her many contributions to Haitian news include the first proposal that Haiti’s cholera had been imported by the UN, and the first story describing Haiti’s mineral wealth.

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