Water for Profit: Haiti’s Thirsty Season
Dady Chery

Private industry and the public sector have joined together to establish the first-ever Global Handwashing Day event, raising awareness to the risk of disease this simple act can prevent.

By Dady Chery Haiti Chery There is no shortage of water in Haiti. Yet, everywhere on the island, Haitians travel for miles to get water, pay dearly for it if they can find it, and sometimes die on their journey … Continue reading

Haiti: Enough Is Enough, Bring on the Revolution!
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery Haiti Chery Ask Haitians on the street why they have put their wiry bodies in the paths of the bullets and tear-gas canisters of Haiti’s various mercenary forces, foreign and domestic, and they will tell you it … Continue reading

Sabotage Leaves Cap Haitien Without Municipal Water | Haïti-Eau potable : Rareté au Cap Haïtien, le système saboté

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By Wedlyne Jacques, AlterPresse | Translation by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. No water from the taps of Cap Haitien residents since early 2012. And they must walk several kilometers to reach a source of water. Some people report that they wake up as early as 2:00 to 5:00 am to queue for half a day to buy water that is not even fit for drinking. (English | French)

Caracol Free-Trade Zone Jeopardizes Natural and Cultural Heritage | La zone franche de Caracol met en péril le patrimoine naturel et culturel du Nord-Est

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By Rachelle Charlier Doucet, AlterPresse | Translation and editorial comment by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. A massive industrial park is scheduled to open in the Caracol Bay area of Haiti, although no plan is in place to mitigate the park’s impact on a region that has been proposed as a World Heritage Site for its ecological, historical, and archaeological importance. The park’s manufacturing and textile dyeing alone will require pumping 6,000 cubic meters of water daily from the groundwater and ejecting toxic wastewater into the Trou du Nord River and, ultimately, Caracol Bay. Electricity will be produced from oil, resulting in heavy and toxic wastes. Construction of 5,000 homes for a predicted migration of 30,000 to 300,000 people is expected to result in bantustanization of the area and neighboring communities. (English | French)

Privatization of Water: Benign as Lucifer

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By Richard Raznikov, The Rag Blog | Democracy Center, YouTube. About 20 years ago, it dawned on the bankers and some major corporations that if oil was a lucrative commodity, water would be even more so…. The trick was how to take it away from the people and sell it back to them. In Bolivia and Argentina, water companies such as Bechtel and Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux were sent packing. Elsewhere in the world, they, and their enforcers the IMF and World Bank, have bought off many local governments and imposed water privatization and widespread misery. Videos show creative solutions in Cochabamba, Bolivia for getting water under local control and accessible to the poor.

Sabotage Leaves Haitian City of Gonaives Without Municipal Water | La ville des Gonaïves sevrée par l’Orepa: Trois mois sans eau courante

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By Mergenat Exalus, AlterPresse | Translation and editorial comment by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. The northern Haitian city of Gonaives has been without water since a sabotage of three water pumping stations last December. The forced dependence of the Haitian population on bottled water, uninspected by local health authorities, poses a grave danger. (English | French)

In Famatina, Water Is Worth Far More Than GoldEl agua vale más que el oro en FamatinaFamatina, onde a água vale mais do que o ouro

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By Marcela Valente, IPS | Periodismo Humano | TN Argentina | You Tube. Thousands in the northwest Argentina province of La Rioja are mobilizing to stop an open-cast gold mining project in the Nevados de Famatina, a snowy peak that is the semi-arid area’s sole source of drinking water. “We take turns [blocking the road to the mountain], and we’re going to hold our ground until the government and the company drop this project,” – Carina Diaz Moreno, teacher from Famatima. (English | Spanish | Portuguese | Includes music video)

Industrial Park Threatens Precious Caracol Bay Ecosystem | Le parc industriel à Caracol : Une situation « gagnante-gagnante » pour tous?

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By Staff, Haiti Grassroots Watch. Part 7 of 7. “It wasn’t possible to anticipate the presence of the complex and precious ecosystem of the Caracol Bay before we conducted this environmental evaluation.” – Impact study by U.S. Koios team. The bay, which is home to mangrove forests and the country’s longest uninterrupted coral reef, is the subject of intense international study and part of several plans for a regional park. (English | French)

Caracol Haiti Industrial Park With Projected Adverse Environmental Impact | Caracol, un parc industriel d’Haïti Parc qui aurait un impact environnemental négatif

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By Staff, Haiti Grassroots Watch. Part 6 of 7. The same week over 300 agricultural plots in Caracol, Haiti, were unexpectedly destroyed, the Haitian government signed an agreement with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, IDB, and Korean textile giant Sae-A Trading to convert the lands into an industrial park. This park will dump its wastes into a bay with extensive coraf reefs and one of the country’s last mangrove forests. (English | French)

Zimbabwe: 40 Water Bottling Companies BannedZimbabwe: 40 Water Bottling Companies BannedZimbabwe: 40 Water Bottling Companies Banned

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By Peter Matambanadzo, The Herald via All Africa. Out of 49 potential bottlers that submitted their water for testing and possible certification, only nine were advised that their water was suitable for bottling.

Drinking Water Discontinued from Haiti Camps for the DisplacedArrêt définitif de la distribution d’eau gratuite dans 17 camps d’ici fin novembre 2011

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By Staff, AlterPresse | Translated by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. DINEPA, Haiti’s office for the National Administration of Sanitation and Drinking Water announced that it will no longer distribute drinking water to 17 of the Port-au-Prince camps for the internally displaced. (English | French)By Staff, AlterPresse (French) | Translated by Dady Chery for Haiti Chery (English). DINEPA, Haiti’s office for the National Administration of Sanitation and Drinking Water announced that it will no longer distribute drinking water to 17 of the Port-au-Prince camps for the internally displaced.By Staff, AlterPresse (French) | Translated by Dady Chery for Haiti Chery (English). DINEPA, Haiti’s office for the National Administration of Sanitation and Drinking Water announced that it will no longer distribute drinking water to 17 of the Port-au-Prince camps for the internally displaced.

Rainwater Harvesting Ideal Source of Freshwater for Haiti

With no piped water, residents of Genus, St. Elizabeth depend on rainwater for domestic and agricultural purposes. Here, a woman harvests water from a tank into which rainwater is channeled from the roofs of two nearby buildings (photo: Ian Allen).

By Jose Pavero and others, In: Source Book of Alternative Technologies for Freshwater Augmentation in Latin America and the Caribbean. Rainwater harvesting is not used in Haiti, but over half a million people in the Caribbean get at least some of their water by this method. Rain-catchment systems are easy to build and operate and cost little to run.By Jose Pavero and others, In: Source Book of Alternative Technologies for Freshwater Augmentation in Latin America and the Caribbean. Rainwater harvesting is not used in Haiti, but over half a million people in the Caribbean get at least some of their water by this method. Rain-catchment systems are easy to build and operate and cost little to run.By Jose Pavero and others, In: Source Book of Alternative Technologies for Freshwater Augmentation in Latin America and the Caribbean. Rainwater harvesting is not used in Haiti, but over half a million people in the Caribbean get at least some of their water by this method. Rain-catchment systems are easy to build and operate and cost little to run.