The Oil We Eat: Following the Food Chain Back to IraqO petróleo que comemos

Bombed Dora Oil Refinery

By Richard Manning
Harper’s

English | Portuguese

The secret of great wealth with no obvious source is some forgotten crime, forgotten because it was done neatly.—Balzac

The journalist’s rule says: follow the money. This rule, however, is not really axiomatic but derivative, in that money, as even our vice president will tell you, is really a way of tracking energy. We’ll follow the energy.

Iraqi oil field

We learn as children that there is no free lunch, that you don’t get something from nothing, that what goes up must come down, and so on. The scientific version of these verities is only slightly more complex. As James Prescott Joule discovered in the nineteenth century, there is only so much energy. You can change it from motion to heat, from heat to light, but there will never be more of it and there will never be less of it. The conservation of energy is not an option, it is a fact. This is the first law of thermodynamics.

Special as we humans are, we get no exemptions from the rules. All animals eat plants or eat animals that eat plants. This is the food chain, and pulling it is the unique ability of plants to turn sunlight into stored energy in the form of carbohydrates, the basic fuel of all animals. Solar-powered photosynthesis is the only way to make this fuel. There is no alternative to plant energy, just as there is no alternative to oxygen. The results of taking away our plant energy may not be as sudden as cutting off oxygen, but they are as sure.

Scientists have a name for the total amount of plant mass created by Earth in a given year, the total budget for life. They call it the planet’s “primary productivity.” There have been two efforts to figure out how that productivity is spent, one by a group at Stanford University, the other an independent accounting by the biologist Stuart Pimm. Both conclude that we humans, a single species among millions, consume about 40 percent of Earth’s primary productivity, 40 percent of all there is. This simple number may explain why the current extinction rate is 1,000 times that which existed before human domination of the planet. We 6 billion have simply stolen the food, the rich among us a lot more than others.

Energy cannot be created or canceled, but it can be concentrated. This is the larger and profoundly explanatory context of a national-security memo George Kennan wrote in 1948 as the head of a State Department planning committee, ostensibly about Asian policy but really about how the United States was to deal with its newfound role as the dominant force on Earth.

“We have about 50 percent of the world’s wealth but only 6.3 percent of its population,” Kennan wrote.

“In this situation, we cannot fail to be the object of envy and resentment. Our real task in the coming period is to devise a pattern of relationships which will permit us to maintain this position of disparity without positive detriment to our national security. To do so, we will have to dispense with all sentimentality and day-dreaming; and our attention will have to be concentrated everywhere on our immediate national objectives. We need not deceive ourselves that we can afford today the luxury of altruism and world-benefaction.”

“The day is not far off,”

Kennan concluded,

“when we are going to have to deal in straight power concepts.”

If you follow the energy, eventually you will end up in a field somewhere. Humans engage in a dizzying array of artifice and industry. Nonetheless, more than two thirds of humanity’s cut of primary productivity results from agriculture, two thirds of which in turn consists of three plants: rice, wheat, and corn. In the 10,000 years since humans domesticated these grains, their status has remained undiminished, most likely because they are able to store solar energy in uniquely dense, transportable bundles of carbohydrates. They are to the plant world what a barrel of refined oil is to the hydrocarbon world. Indeed, aside from hydrocarbons they are the most concentrated form of true wealth—sun energy—to be found on the planet.

As Kennan recognized, however, the maintenance of such a concentration of wealth often requires violent action. Agriculture is a recent human experiment. For most of human history, we lived by gathering or killing a broad variety of nature’s offerings. Why humans might have traded this approach for the complexities of agriculture is an interesting and long-debated question, especially because the skeletal evidence clearly indicates that early farmers were more poorly nourished, more disease-ridden and deformed, than their hunter-gatherer contemporaries. Farming did not improve most lives. The evidence that best points to the answer, I think, lies in the difference between early agricultural villages and their pre-agricultural counterparts—the presence not just of grain but of granaries and, more tellingly, of just a few houses significantly larger and more ornate than all the others attached to those granaries. Agriculture was not so much about food as it was about the accumulation of wealth. It benefited some humans, and those people have been in charge ever since.

Domestication was also a radical change in the distribution of wealth within the plant world. Plants can spend their solar income in several ways. The dominant and prudent strategy is to allocate most of it to building roots, stem, bark—a conservative portfolio of investments that allows the plant to better gather energy and survive the downturn years. Further, by living in diverse stands (a given chunk of native prairie contains maybe 200 species of plants), these perennials provide services for one another, such as retaining water, protecting one another from wind, and fixing free nitrogen from the air to use as fertilizer. Diversity allows a system to “sponsor its own fertility,” to use visionary agronomist Wes Jackson’s phrase. This is the plant world’s norm.

There is a very narrow group of annuals, however, that grow in patches of a single species and store almost all of their income as seed, a tight bundle of carbohydrates easily exploited by seed eaters such as ourselves. Under normal circumstances, this eggs-in-one-basket strategy is a dumb idea for a plant. But not during catastrophes such as floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions. Such catastrophes strip established plant communities and create opportunities for wind-scattered entrepreneurial seed bearers. It is no accident that no matter where agriculture sprouted on the globe, it always happened near rivers. You might assume, as many have, that this is because the plants needed the water or nutrients. Mostly this is not true. They needed the power of flooding, which scoured landscapes and stripped out competitors. Nor is it an accident, I think, that agriculture arose independently and simultaneously around the globe just as the last ice age ended, a time of enormous upheaval when glacial melt let loose sea-size lakes to create tidal waves of erosion. It was a time of catastrophe.

Corn, rice, and wheat are especially adapted to catastrophe. It is their niche. In the natural scheme of things, a catastrophe would create a blank slate, bare soil, that was good for them. Then, under normal circumstances, succession would quickly close that niche. The annuals would colonize. Their roots would stabilize the soil, accumulate organic matter, provide cover. Eventually the catastrophic niche would close. Farming is the process of ripping that niche open again and again. It is an annual artificial catastrophe, and it requires the equivalent of three or four tons of TNT per acre for a modern American farm. Iowa’s fields require the energy of 4,000 Nagasaki bombs every year.

Iowa is almost all fields now. Little prairie remains, and if you can find what Iowans call a “postage stamp” remnant of some, it most likely will abut a corn field. This allows an observation. Walk from the prairie to the field, and you probably will step down about six feet, as if the land had been stolen from beneath you. Settlers’ accounts of the prairie conquest mention a sound, a series of pops, like pistol shots, the sound of stout grass roots breaking before a moldboard plow. A robbery was in progress.

When we say the soil is rich, it is not a metaphor. It is as rich in energy as an oil well. A prairie converts that energy to flowers and roots and stems, which in turn pass back into the ground as dead organic matter. The layers of topsoil build up into a rich repository of energy, a bank. A farm field appropriates that energy, puts it into seeds we can eat. Much of the energy moves from the earth to the rings of fat around our necks and waists. And much of the energy is simply wasted, a trail of dollars billowing from the burglar’s satchel.

I’ve already mentioned that we humans take 40 percent of the globe’s primary productivity every year. You might have assumed we and our livestock eat our way through that volume, but this is not the case. Part of that total—almost a third of it—is the potential plant mass lost when forests are cleared for farming or when tropical rain forests are cut for grazing or when plows destroy the deep mat of prairie roots that held the whole business together, triggering erosion. The Dust Bowl was no accident of nature. A functioning grassland prairie produces more biomass each year than does even the most technologically advanced wheat field. The problem is, it’s mostly a form of grass and grass roots that humans can’t eat. So we replace the prairie with our own preferred grass, wheat. Never mind that we feed most of our grain to livestock, and that livestock is perfectly content to eat native grass. And never mind that there likely were more bison produced naturally on the Great Plains before farming than all of beef farming raises in the same area today. Our ancestors found it preferable to pluck the energy from the ground and when it ran out move on.

Today we do the same, only now when the vault is empty we fill it again with new energy in the form of oil-rich fertilizers. Oil is annual primary productivity stored as hydrocarbons, a trust fund of sorts, built up over many thousands of years. On average, it takes 5.5 gallons of fossil energy to restore a year’s worth of lost fertility to an acre of eroded land—in 1997 we burned through more than 400 years’ worth of ancient fossilized productivity, most of it from someplace else. Even as the earth beneath Iowa shrinks, it is being globalized.

Six thousand years before sodbusters broke up Iowa, their Caucasian blood ancestors broke up the Hungarian plain, an area just northwest of the Caucasus Mountains. Archaeologists call this tribe the LBK, short for linearbandkeramik, the German word that describes the distinctive pottery remnants that mark their occupation of Europe. Anthropologists call them the wheat-beef people, a name that better connects those ancients along the Danube to my fellow Montanans on the Upper Missouri River. These proto-Europeans had a full set of domesticated plants and animals, but wheat and beef dominated. All the domesticates came from an area along what is now the Iraq-Syria-Turkey border at the edges of the Zagros Mountains. This is the center of domestication for the Western world’s main crops and livestock, ground zero of catastrophic agriculture.

Two other types of catastrophic agriculture evolved at roughly the same time, one centered on rice in what is now China and India and one centered on corn and potatoes in Central and South America. Rice, though, is tropical and its expansion depends on water, so it developed only in floodplains, estuaries, and swamps. Corn agriculture was every bit as voracious as wheat; the Aztecs could be as brutal and imperialistic as Romans or Brits, but the corn cultures collapsed with the onslaught of Spanish conquest. Corn itself simply joined the wheat-beef people’s coalition. Wheat was the empire builder; its bare botanical facts dictated the motion and violence that we know as imperialism.

The wheat-beef people swept across the western European plains in less than 300 years, a conquest some archaeologists refer to as a “blitzkrieg.” A different race of humans, the Cro-Magnons—hunter-gatherers, not farmers—lived on those plains at the time. Their cave art at places such as Lascaux testifies to their sophistication and profound connection to wildlife. They probably did most of their hunting and gathering in uplands and river bottoms, places the wheat farmers didn’t need, suggesting the possibility of coexistence. That’s not what happened, however. Both genetic and linguistic evidence say that the farmers killed the hunters. The Basque people are probably the lone remnant descendants of Cro-Magnons, the only trace.

Hunter-gatherer archaeological sites of the period contain spear points that originally belonged to the farmers, and we can guess they weren’t trade goods. One group of anthropologists concludes,

“The evidence from the western extension of the LBK leaves little room for any other conclusion but that LBK-Mesolithic interactions were at best chilly and at worst hostile.”

The world’s surviving Blackfeet, Assiniboine Sioux, Inca, and Maori probably have the best idea of the nature of these interactions.

Wheat is temperate and prefers plowed-up grasslands. The globe has a limited stock of temperate grasslands, just as it has a limited stock of all other biomes. On average, about 10 percent of all other biomes remain in something like their native state today. Only 1 percent of temperate grasslands remains undestroyed. Wheat takes what it needs.

The supply of temperate grasslands lies in what are today the United States, Canada, the South American pampas, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Europe, and the Asiatic extension of the European plain into the sub-Siberian steppes. This area largely describes the First World, the developed world. Temperate grasslands make up not only the habitat of wheat and beef but also the globe’s islands of Caucasians, of European surnames and languages. In 2000 the countries of the temperate grasslands, the neo-Europes, accounted for about 80 percent of all wheat exports in the world, and about 86 percent of all corn. That is to say, the neo-Europes drive the world’s agriculture. The dominance does not stop with grain. These countries, plus the mothership—Europe—accounted for three fourths of all agricultural exports of all crops in the world in 1999.

Plato wrote of his country’s farmlands:

What now remains of the formerly rich land is like the skeleton of a sick man. . . . Formerly, many of the mountains were arable. The plains that were full of rich soil are now marshes. Hills that were once covered with forests and produced abundant pasture now produce only food for bees. Once the land was enriched by yearly rains, which were not lost, as they are now, by flowing from the bare land into the sea. The soil was deep, it absorbed and kept the water in loamy soil, and the water that soaked into the hills fed springs and running streams everywhere. Now the abandoned shrines at spots where formerly there were springs attest that our description of the land is true.

Plato’s lament is rooted in wheat agriculture, which depleted his country’s soil and subsequently caused the series of declines that pushed centers of civilization to Rome, Turkey, and western Europe. By the fifth century, though, wheat’s strategy of depleting and moving on ran up against the Atlantic Ocean. Fenced-in wheat agriculture is like rice agriculture. It balances its equations with famine. In the millennium between 500 and 1500, Britain suffered a major “corrective” famine about every ten years; there were seventy-five in France during the same period. The incidence, however, dropped sharply when colonization brought an influx of new food to Europe.

The new lands had an even greater effect on the colonists themselves. Thomas Jefferson, after enduring a lecture on the rustic nature by his hosts at a dinner party in Paris, pointed out that all of the Americans present were a good head taller than all of the French. Indeed, colonists in all of the neo-Europes enjoyed greater stature and longevity, as well as a lower infant-mortality rate—all indicators of the better nutrition afforded by the onetime spend down of the accumulated capital of virgin soil.

The precolonial famines of Europe raised the question: What would happen when the planet’s supply of arable land ran out? We have a clear answer. In about 1960 expansion hit its limits and the supply of unfarmed, arable lands came to an end. There was nothing left to plow. What happened was grain yields tripled.

The accepted term for this strange turn of events is the green revolution, though it would be more properly labeled the amber revolution, because it applied exclusively to grain—wheat, rice, and corn. Plant breeders tinkered with the architecture of these three grains so that they could be hypercharged with irrigation water and chemical fertilizers, especially nitrogen. This innovation meshed nicely with the increased “efficiency” of the industrialized factory-farm system. With the possible exception of the domestication of wheat, the green revolution is the worst thing that has ever happened to the planet.

For openers, it disrupted long-standing patterns of rural life worldwide, moving a lot of no-longer-needed people off the land and into the world’s most severe poverty. The experience in population control in the developing world is by now clear: It is not that people make more people so much as it is that they make more poor people. In the forty-year period beginning about 1960, the world’s population doubled, adding virtually the entire increase of 3 billion to the world’s poorest classes, the most fecund classes. The way in which the green revolution raised that grain contributed hugely to the population boom, and it is the weight of the population that leaves humanity in its present untenable position.

Discussion of these, the most poor, however, is largely irrelevant to the American situation. We say we have poor people here, but almost no one in this country lives on less than one dollar a day, the global benchmark for poverty. It marks off a class of about 1.3 billion people, the hard core of the larger group of 2 billion chronically malnourished people—that is, one third of humanity. We may forget about them, as most Americans do.

More relevant here are the methods of the green revolution, which added orders of magnitude to the devastation. By mining the iron for tractors, drilling the new oil to fuel them and to make nitrogen fertilizers, and by taking the water that rain and rivers had meant for other lands, farming had extended its boundaries, its dominion, to lands that were not farmable. At the same time, it extended its boundaries across time, tapping fossil energy, stripping past assets.

The common assumption these days is that we muster our weapons to secure oil, not food. There’s a little joke in this. Ever since we ran out of arable land, food is oil. Every single calorie we eat is backed by at least a calorie of oil, more like ten. In 1940 the average farm in the United States produced 2.3 calories of food energy for every calorie of fossil energy it used. By 1974 (the last year in which anyone looked closely at this issue), that ratio was 1:1. And this understates the problem, because at the same time that there is more oil in our food there is less oil in our oil. A couple of generations ago we spent a lot less energy drilling, pumping, and distributing than we do now. In the 1940s we got about 100 barrels of oil back for every barrel of oil we spent getting it. Today each barrel invested in the process returns only ten, a calculation that no doubt fails to include the fuel burned by the Hummers and Blackhawks we use to maintain access to the oil in Iraq.

David Pimentel, an expert on food and energy at Cornell University, has estimated that if all of the world ate the way the United States eats, humanity would exhaust all known global fossil-fuel reserves in just over seven years. Pimentel has his detractors. Some have accused him of being off on other calculations by as much as 30 percent. Fine. Make it ten years.

Fertilizer makes a pretty fine bomb right off the shelf, a chemistry lesson Timothy McVeigh taught at Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in 1995—not a small matter, in that the green revolution has made nitrogen fertilizers ubiquitous in some of the more violent and desperate corners of the world. Still, there is more to contemplate in nitrogen’s less sensational chemistry.

The chemophobia of modern times excludes fear of the simple elements of chemistry’s periodic table. We circulate petitions, hold hearings, launch websites, and buy and sell legislators in regard to polysyllabic organic compounds—polychlorinated biphenyls, polyvinyls, DDT, 2-4d, that sort of thing—not simple carbon or nitrogen. Not that agriculture’s use of the more ornate chemistry is benign—an infant born in a rural, wheat-producing county in the United States has about twice the chance of suffering birth defects as one born in a rural place that doesn’t produce wheat, an effect researchers blame on chlorophenoxy herbicides. Focusing on pesticide pollution, though, misses the worst of the pollutants. Forget the polysyllabic organics. It is nitrogen—the wellspring of fertility relied upon by every Eden-obsessed backyard gardener and suburban groundskeeper—that we should fear most.

Those who model our planet as an organism do so on the basis that the earth appears to breathe—it thrives by converting a short list of basic elements from one compound into the next, just as our own bodies cycle oxygen into carbon dioxide and plants cycle carbon dioxide into oxygen. In fact, two of the planet’s most fundamental humors are oxygen and carbon dioxide. Another is nitrogen.

Nitrogen can be released from its “fixed” state as a solid in the soil by natural processes that allow it to circulate freely in the atmosphere. This also can be done artificially. Indeed, humans now contribute more nitrogen to the nitrogen cycle than the planet itself does. That is, humans have doubled the amount of nitrogen in play.

This has led to an imbalance. It is easier to create nitrogen fertilizer than it is to apply it evenly to fields. When farmers dump nitrogen on a crop, much is wasted. It runs into the water and soil, where it either reacts chemically with its surroundings to form new compounds or flows off to fertilize something else, somewhere else.

That chemical reaction, called acidification, is noxious and contributes significantly to acid rain. One of the compounds produced by acidification is nitrous oxide, which aggravates the greenhouse effect. Green growing things normally offset global warming by sucking up carbon dioxide, but nitrogen on farm fields plus methane from decomposing vegetation make every farmed acre, like every acre of Los Angeles freeway, a net contributor to global warming. Fertilization is equally worrisome. Rainfall and irrigation water inevitably washes the nitrogen from fields to creeks and streams, which flows into rivers, which floods into the ocean. This explains why the Mississippi River, which drains the nation’s Corn Belt, is an environmental catastrophe. The nitrogen fertilizes artificially large blooms of algae that in growing suck all the oxygen from the water, a condition biologists call anoxia, which means “oxygen-depleted.” Here there’s no need to calculate long-term effects, because life in such places has no long term: everything dies immediately. The Mississippi River’s heavily fertilized effluvia has created a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico the size of New Jersey.

America’s biggest crop, grain corn, is completely unpalatable. It is raw material for an industry that manufactures food substitutes. Likewise, you can’t eat unprocessed wheat. You certainly can’t eat hay. You can eat unprocessed soybeans, but mostly we don’t. These four crops cover 82 percent of American cropland. Agriculture in this country is not about food; it’s about commodities that require the outlay of still more energy to become food.

About two thirds of U.S. grain corn is labeled “processed,” meaning it is milled and otherwise refined for food or industrial uses. More than 45 percent of that becomes sugar, especially high-fructose corn sweeteners, the keystone ingredient in three quarters of all processed foods, especially soft drinks, the food of America’s poor and working classes. It is not a coincidence that the American pandemic of obesity tracks rather nicely with the fivefold increase in corn-syrup production since Archer Daniels Midland developed a high-fructose version of the stuff in the early seventies. Nor is it a coincidence that the plague selects the poor, who eat the most processed food.

It began with the industrialization of Victorian England. The empire was then flush with sugar from plantations in the colonies. Meantime the cities were flush with factory workers. There was no good way to feed them. And thus was born the afternoon tea break, the tea consisting primarily of warm water and sugar. If the workers were well off, they could also afford bread with heavily sugared jam—sugar-powered industrialization. There was a 500 percent increase in per capita sugar consumption in Britain between 1860 and 1890, around the time when the life expectancy of a male factory worker was seventeen years. By the end of the century the average Brit was getting about one sixth of his total nutrition from sugar, exactly the same percentage Americans get today—double what nutritionists recommend.

There is another energy matter to consider here, though. The grinding, milling, wetting, drying, and baking of a breakfast cereal requires about four calories of energy for every calorie of food energy it produces. A two-pound bag of breakfast cereal burns the energy of a half-gallon of gasoline in its making. All together the food-processing industry in the United States uses about ten calories of fossil-fuel energy for every calorie of food energy it produces.

That number does not include the fuel used in transporting the food from the factory to a store near you, or the fuel used by millions of people driving to thousands of super discount stores on the edge of town, where the land is cheap. It appears, however, that the corn cycle is about to come full circle. If a bipartisan coalition of farm-state lawmakers has their way—and it appears they will—we will soon buy gasoline containing twice as much fuel alcohol as it does now. Fuel alcohol already ranks second as a use for processed corn in the United States, just behind corn sweeteners. According to one set of calculations, we spend more calories of fossil-fuel energy making ethanol than we gain from it. The Department of Agriculture says the ratio is closer to a gallon and a quart of ethanol for every gallon of fossil fuel we invest. The USDA calls this a bargain, because gasohol is a “clean fuel.” This claim to cleanness is in dispute at the tailpipe level, and it certainly ignores the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, pesticide pollution, and the haze of global gases gathering over every farm field. Nor does this claim cover clean conscience; some still might be unsettled knowing that our SUVs’ demands for fuel compete with the poor’s demand for grain.

Green eaters, especially vegetarians, advocate eating low on the food chain, a simple matter of energy flow. Eating a carrot gives the diner all that carrot’s energy, but feeding carrots to a chicken, then eating the chicken, reduces the energy by a factor of ten. The chicken wastes some energy, stores some as feathers, bones, and other inedibles, and uses most of it just to live long enough to be eaten. As a rough rule of thumb, that factor of ten applies to each level up the food chain, which is why some fish, such as tuna, can be a horror in all of this. Tuna is a secondary predator, meaning it not only doesn’t eat plants but eats other fish that themselves eat other fish, adding a zero to the multiplier each notch up, easily a hundred times, more like a thousand times less efficient than eating a plant.

This is fine as far as it goes, but the vegetarian’s case can break down on some details. On the moral issues, vegetarians claim their habits are kinder to animals, though it is difficult to see how wiping out 99 percent of wildlife’s habitat, as farming has done in Iowa, is a kindness. In rural Michigan, for example, the potato farmers have a peculiar tactic for dealing with the predations of whitetail deer. They gut-shoot them with small-bore rifles, in hopes the deer will limp off to the woods and die where they won’t stink up the potato fields.

Animal rights aside, vegetarians can lose the edge in the energy argument by eating processed food, with its ten calories of fossil energy for every calorie of food energy produced. The question, then, is: Does eating processed food such as soy burger or soy milk cancel the energy benefits of vegetarianism, which is to say, can I eat my lamb chops in peace? Maybe. If I’ve done my due diligence, I will have found out that the particular lamb I am eating was both local and grass-fed, two factors that of course greatly reduce the embedded energy in a meal. I know of ranches here in Montana, for instance, where sheep eat native grass under closely controlled circumstances—no farming, no plows, no corn, no nitrogen. Assets have not been stripped. I can’t eat the grass directly. This can go on. There are little niches like this in the system. Each person’s individual charge is to find such niches.

Chances are, though, any meat eater will come out on the short end of this argument, especially in the United States. Take the case of beef. Cattle are grazers, so in theory could live like the grass-fed lamb. Some cattle cultures—those of South America and Mexico, for example—have perfected wonderful cuisines based on grass-fed beef. This is not our habit in the United States, and it is simply a matter of habit. Eighty percent of the grain the United States produces goes to livestock. Seventy-eight percent of all of our beef comes from feed lots, where the cattle eat grain, mostly corn and wheat. So do most of our hogs and chickens. The cattle spend their adult lives packed shoulder to shoulder in a space not much bigger than their bodies, up to their knees in shit, being stuffed with grain and a constant stream of antibiotics to prevent the disease this sort of confinement invariably engenders. The manure is rich in nitrogen and once provided a farm’s fertilizer. The feedlots, however, are now far removed from farm fields, so it is simply not “efficient” to haul it to cornfields. It is waste. It exhales methane, a global-warming gas. It pollutes streams. It takes thirty-five calories of fossil fuel to make a calorie of beef this way; sixty-eight to make one calorie of pork.

Still, these livestock do something we can’t. They convert grain’s carbohydrates to high-quality protein. All well and good, except that per capita protein production in the United States is about double what an average adult needs per day. Excess cannot be stored as protein in the human body but is simply converted to fat. This is the end result of a factory-farm system that appears as a living, continental-scale monument to Rube Goldberg, a black-mass remake of the loaves-and-fishes miracle. Prairie’s productivity is lost for grain, grain’s productivity is lost in livestock, livestock’s protein is lost to human fat—all federally subsidized for about $15 billion a year, two thirds of which goes directly to only two crops, corn and wheat.

This explains why the energy expert David Pimentel is so worried that the rest of the world will adopt America’s methods. He should be, because the rest of the world is. Mexico now feeds 45 percent of its grain to livestock, up from 5 percent in 1960. Egypt went from 3 percent to 31 percent in the same period, and China, with a sixth of the world’s population, has gone from 8 percent to 26 percent. All of these places have poor people who could use the grain, but they can’t afford it.

I live among elk and have learned to respect them. One moonlit night during the dead of last winter, I looked out my bedroom window to see about twenty of them grazing a plot of grass the size of a living room. Just that small patch among acres of other species of native prairie grass. Why that species and only that species of grass that night in the worst of winter when the threat to their survival was the greatest? What magic nutrient did this species alone contain? What does a wild animal know that we don’t? I think we need this knowledge.

Food is politics. That being the case, I voted twice in 2002. The day after Election Day, in a truly dismal mood, I climbed the mountain behind my house and found a small herd of elk grazing native grasses in the morning sunlight. My respect for these creatures over the years has become great enough that on that morning I did not hesitate but went straight to my job, which was to rack a shell and drop one cow elk, my household’s annual protein supply. I voted with my weapon of choice—an act not all that uncommon in this world, largely, I think, as a result of the way we grow food. I can see why it is catching on. Such a vote has a certain satisfying heft and finality about it. My particular bit of violence, though, is more satisfying, I think, than the rest of the globe’s ordinary political mayhem. I used a rifle to opt out of an insane system. I killed, but then so did you when you bought that package of burger, even when you bought that package of tofu burger. I killed, then the rest of those elk went on, as did the grasses, the birds, the trees, the coyotes, mountain lions, and bugs, the fundamental productivity of an intact natural system, all of it went on.

Source:  Harper’s

O petróleo que comemos

Seguindo a cadeia alimentar até o Iraque

Por Richard Manning

inglês | português

O segredo de uma grande riqueza com nenhuma fonte óbvia é algum crime esquecido porque foi cometido de modo impecável.
— Balzac

  A regra dos jornalistas diz: siga o dinheiro. Esta regra, contudo, não é realmente axiomática e sim um corolário pois o dinheiro, como até o nosso vice-presidente poderá confirmar, é na verdade um meio de ir ao encalço da energia. Nós seguiremos a energia.

Aprendemos em criança que não há almoços gratuitos; que não se pode obter alguma coisa a partir do nada; que o que sobe deve descer, e assim por diante. A versão científica destas verdades é apenas ligeiramente mais complexa. Como descobriu James Prescott Joule no século XIX, há apenas um tanto de energia. Você pode mudá-la de movimento para calor, de calor para luz, mas nunca haverá mais nem nunca haverá menos dela. A conservação da energia não é uma opção, é um facto. Esta é a primeira lei da termodinâmica.

Ainda que os humanos sejam especiais, não podemos fugir às regras. Todos os animais comem plantas ou comem animais que comem plantas. Isto é a cadeia alimentar, e a atracção é a capacidade única das plantas de transformar a luz do sol em energia armazenada sob a forma de carbohidratos, o combustível básico de todos os animais. A fotosíntese da luz do sol é o único meio de fabricar este combustível. Não há alternativa para a energia das plantas, assim como não há alternativa para o oxigénio. Os resultados da eliminação da energia que obtemos das plantas podem não ser tão súbitos como o do corte do oxigénio, mas eles são inevitáveis.

Os cientistas dão um nome à quantidade total da massa de plantas criada pela Terra num dado ano, que é o orçamento total para a vida. Eles chamam a isto a “produtividade primária” do planeta. Houve duas tentativas de descobrir como é gasta tal produtividade, uma de um grupo na Universidade de Stanford e outra de uma contagem independente efectuada pelo biólogo Stuar Pimm. Ambas concluem que nós humanos, uma espécie única entre milhões, consumimos 40 por cento da produtividade primária da Terra, 40 por cento de tudo o que há. Este simples número pode explicar porque a actual taxa de extinção é 1000 vezes [maior] daquela que existiu antes do domínio humano sobre o planeta. Nós 6 mil milhões simplesmente roubámos a comida, os ricos entre nós roubaram um bocado mais do que os outros.

A energia não pode ser criada ou eliminada, mas pode ser concentrada. Este é o contexto mais amplo e profundo que explica um memorando sobre segurança nacional escrito por George Kennan 1948, quando era responsável por um comité de planeamento do Departamento de Estado. Aparentemente é acerca da política asiática mas na verdade é acerca de como os Estados Unidos deveriam actuar no seu novo papel de força dominante da Terra. “Temos cerca de 50 por cento da riqueza do mundo mas apenas 6,3 por cento da sua população”, escreveu Kennan. “Em tal situação, não poderemos deixar de ser objecto de inveja e ressentimento. Nossa tarefa real no período vindouro é conceber um padrão de relacionamento que nos permita manter esta posição de disparidade sem prejudicar a nossa segurança nacional. Para conseguir isso teremos de dispensar quaisquer sentimentalismos e devaneios; nossa atenção terá concentrar-se em todos os aspectos dos objectivos nacionais imediatos. Precisamos não nos enganar a nós próprios com a ideia de que podemos permitir-nos hoje o luxo do altruísmo e da beneficência mundial”. “Não está longe o dia”, concluiu Kennan, “em que teremos de tratar [o mundo] em termos de conceitos de poder directo”.

ARROZ, MILHO, TRIGO

Se você seguir a energia, acabará finalmente num campo algures. Os humanos empenham-se num vertiginoso conjunto de artifícios e indústria. No entanto, mais de dois terços da humanidade depende dos resultados da produtividade primária da agricultura, dois terços do quais por sua vez consistem em três plantas: arroz, trigo e milho. Nos 10 mil anos decorridos desde que os humanos domesticaram estes grãos, o seu status permaneceu em toda plenitude, mais provavelmente porque os mesmos são capazes de armazenar energia solar em maços densos e transportáveis de carbohidratos de uma forma única. Eles são para a vegetação mundial aquilo que um barril de petróleo refinado representa para os hidrocarbonetos mundiais. Na verdade, com excepção dos hidrocarbonetos, são a mais concentrada forma de riqueza verdadeira — a energia do sol — encontrável sobre o planeta.

Como reconheceu Kennan, entretanto, a manutenção de uma tal concentração de riqueza muitas vezes exige acções violentas. A agricultura é um experimento humano recente. Durante a maior parte da história humana vivemos da colecta ou da matança de uma vasta variedade de bens da natureza. A razão porque os humanos poderão ter mudado esta abordagem para as complexidades da agricultura é uma questão interessante e debatida há muito, especialmente porque a evidência esquelética indica claramente que os agricultores primitivos eram alimentados mais pobremente, mais sujeitos a doenças e deformados do que os seus contemporâneos caçadores-colectores. A agricultura não melhorou a maior parte das vidas. A evidência que melhor aponta para a resposta, penso eu, jaz na diferença entre as aldeias agrícolas primitivas e as suas equivalentes pré-agrícolas — a presença não apenas de grão mas de celeiros e, de forma mais reveladora, de apenas umas poucas casas significativamente maiores e mais enfeitadas do que todas as outras anexas àqueles celeiros. A agricultura era não tanto uma questão de comida e sim uma questão de acumulação de riqueza. Ela beneficiou alguns humanos, e aquelas pessoas ficaram nas chefias desde então.

A domesticação também foi uma mudança radical na distribuição de riqueza no interior da vegetação. As plantas podem dispender o seu rendimento solar de vários modos. A estratégia dominante e prudente é atribuir a maior parte delas à construção de raízes, troncos, cascas — uma carteira de investimentos conservadora que permita à planta melhor reunir energia e sobreviver nos anos maus. Além disso, ao viver em diversas posturas (um dado bocado de pradaria nativa talvez contenha umas 200 espécies de plantas), estas plantas perenes proporcionam serviços para outras, tais como reter água, protegerem-se umas às outras do vento, e fixar nitrogénio livre do ar para utilizar como fertilizante. A diversidade permite a um sistema “promover a sua própria fertilidade”, para usar uma frase do agrónomo visionário Wes Jackson. Isto é a norma mundial das plantas.

Há um grupo muito estreito de plantas anuais, contudo, que crescem em manchas de espécies únicas e armazenam quase todo o seu rendimento enquanto semente, num fardo compactado de carbohidratos facilmente exploráveis por comedores de sementes como nós próprios. Sob circunstâncias normais, esta estratégia de por todos os ovos num cesto é uma ideia tola para uma planta. Mas não durante catástrofes tais como inundações, incêndios e erupções vulcânicas. Tais catástrofes varrem as comunidades de plantas estabelecidas e criam oportunidades para o vento espalhar sementes portadoras de espírito empresarial. Não é por acidente que não importa onde a agricultura tenha florescido no globo, isto sempre aconteceu próximo a rios. Pode-se assumir, como muitos o fizeram, que isto se verifica porque as plantas precisam da água ou de nutrientes. Na maioria das vezes não é verdade. Elas precisam do poder da inundação, a qual limpa paisagens e afasta competidores. Não é por acaso, penso, que a agricultura cresce independentemente e simultaneamente por todo o globo assim que termina a última era glacial, um tempo de enorme reviravolta quando o gelo glacial fundiu-se formando grandes lagos que criaram ondas de erosão. Foi um tempo de catástrofe.

O milho, o arroz e o trigo são especialmente adaptados à catástrofe. Este é o seu nicho. No esquema natural das coisas, uma catástrofe criaria um quadro em branco, um solo nu, o que era bom para elas. Então, sob circunstâncias normais, a sucessão rapidamente preencheria aquela nicho. As plantas anuais colonizariam. As suas raízes estabilizariam o solo, acumulariam matéria orgânica, proporcionariam cobertura. Finalmente o nicho catastrófico fechar-se-ia. A agricultura é o processo de lavrar aquele nicho aberto muitas e muitas vezes. É uma catástrofe anual artificial e exige o equivalente a três ou quatro toneladas de TNT por acre (4047 m 2 ) numa moderna propriedade agrícola americana. Os campos de Iowa exigem a energia de 4000 bombas de Nagasaki por ano.

Quase toda Iowa agora é campo. Pequenas pradarias subsistem, aquilo a que os iowanos chamam um “selo postal” remanescente, muito provavelmente a confinar com um campo de milho. Isto permite uma observação. Passeie da pradaria para o campo e provavelmente descerá cerca de seis pés (1,8 m), como se a terra houvesse sido roubada debaixo de si. Relatos de colonizadores que conquistaram a pradaria mencionam um som, uma série de estouros, como tiros de pistolas, o som de robustas raízes a romperem-se perante as lâminas do arado (moldboard plow). Um esbulho estava em andamento.

Quanto dizemos que o solo é rico, isto não é uma metáfora. Ele é tão rico em energia quanto um poço de petróleo. Uma pradaria converte energia para flores, raízes e caules, os quais por sua vez retornam ao solo como matéria orgânica morta. As camadas do topo do solo acumularam um rico repositório de energia, um banco. Um campo agrícola apropria-se daquela energia, transforma-a em sementes que podemos comer. Grande parte da energia move-se da terra para os anéis de gordura em torno das nossas nucas e cinturas. E muita da energia é simplesmente desperdiçada, um rasto de dólares a escapar do saco do ladrão.

Já mencionei que nós humanos tomamos 40 por cento da produtividade primária do globo a cada ano. Você pode ter suposto que nós e o nosso gado comemos todo aquele volume, mas não é o caso. Parte daquele total – quase um terço dele – é o potencial da massa de plantas perdidas quando florestas são derrubadas para a agricultura ou quando florestas de chuva tropical são cortadas para serem transformadas em pasto ou quando arados destroem a trama profunda de raízes de pradaria que mantêm todo o negócio junto, disparando a erosão. O Dust Bowl [1] não foi um acidente da natureza. Uma pradaria de pasto em funcionamento produz mais biomassa por ano do que o faz o mais tecnologicamente avançado dos campo de trigo. O problema é que na maior parte sob a forma de uma erva que os humanos não podem comer. Assim, substituímos a pradaria com a nossa própria erva preferida, o trigo. Não importa que alimentemos a maior do nosso gado com cereais, e que o gado fique perfeitamente satisfeito em comer ervas nativas. E não importa que ali provavelmente houvesse mais bisontes produzidos naturalmente sobre as Grandes Planícies antes da agricultura do que todo o bife que os agricultores hoje criam na mesma área. Nossos ancestrais achavam preferível retirar a energia do solo e moverem-se quando ela desaparecia.

Hoje fazemos o mesmo, só que agora, quando o cofre está vazio, nós o enchemos outra vez com nova energia na forma de fertilizantes ricos em petróleo. O petróleo é produtividade primária anual armazenada como hidrocarbonetos, um fundo fiduciário (trust fund) de pouco valor, acumulado ao longo de muito milhares de anos. Em média, gasta-se 5,5 galões (20,8 litros) de energia fóssil para restaurar o valor da fertilidade anual perdida num acre (4047 m 2 ) de terra erodida – em 1997 queimámos directamente o valor de mais de 400 anos de antiga produtividade fossilizada, a maior parte dela proveniente de lugares distantes. Quando a terra debaixo de Iowa encolhe-se, está a ser globalizada.

Seis mil anos antes de agricultores (sodbusters) irromperem em Iowa, seus ancestrais caucasianos irromperam na planície húngara, uma área a noroeste das Montanhas do Cáucaso. Os arqueólogos denominam esta tribo como LBK, abreviatura para linearbandkeramik, a palavra alemã que descreve a cerâmica inconfundível que marca a sua ocupação da Europa. Os antropólogos chamam-nos o povo trigo-bife, um nome que liga melhor aqueles povos antigos ao longo do Danúbio com os meus companheiros de Montana na parte alta do Rio Missouri. Estes proto-europeus tinham um conjunto completo de plantas e animais domesticados, mas o trigo e o bife dominavam. Todos os domesticados provinham de uma área ao longo do que é agora a fronteira da Iraque-Síria-Turquia que orla as Montanhas Zagros. Este foi o centro de domesticação das principais plantações e gado vivo do mundo ocidental, o marco zero da agricultura catastrófica.

Dois outros tipos de agricultura catastrófica evoluíram aproximadamente ao mesmo tempo, uma centrada sobre o arroz no que é agora a China e a Índia e outra centrada sobre o milho e as batatas na América Central e do Sul. O arroz é tropical e sua expansão depende da água, de modo que desenvolveu-se apenas em planícies inundáveis, estuários e pântanos. A agricultura do milho era tão voraz quanto a do trigo; os aztecas podiam ser tão brutais e imperialistas quanto os romanos ou os britânicos, mas as culturas do milho entraram em colapso com a carnificina da conquista espanhola. O próprio milho simplesmente juntou-se à coligação do povo do trigo-bife. O trigo era o construtor do império; seus reduzidos factos botânicos ditavam o movimento e a violência que conhecemos como imperialismo.

O povo do trigo-bife passou rapidamente através das planícies da Europa ocidental, em menos de 300 anos, uma conquista que alguns arqueólogos chamam de “blitzkrieg”. Uma raça diferente de humanos, os Cromagnons – caçadores-colectores, não agricultores – vivia naquelas planícies ao tempo. Sua arte em cavernas em lugares tais como Lascaux testemunha o seu refinamento e ligação profunda à fauna selvagem. Eles provavelmente realizavam a maior da sua caça e colecta em terras altas e em rios, lugares que os agricultores do trigo não necessitavam, o que sugere a possibilidade da coexistência. Contudo, não foi o que aconteceu. Tanto a evidência genética como a linguística indica que os agricultores mataram os caçadores. O povo basco é provavelmente o único remanescente que descende dos Cromagnons, o único sinal.

Os sítios arqueológicos do período de caçadores-colectores contêm pontas de lança afiadas que originalmente pertenciam aos agricultores, e podemos imaginar que não eram bens comerciais. Um grupo de antropólogos concluiu: “A evidência da extensão ocidental dos LBK deixa pouco espaço para qualquer outra conclusão a não ser que as interacções LBK-Mesolíticas foram na melhor das hipóteses gélidas e na pior hostis”. Os sobreviventes do mundo do Pés Pretos, Sioux Assiniboine, Incas e Maori provavelmente têm a melhor ideia do que foi a natureza destas interacções.

O trigo é temperado e prefere campos arados. O globo tem um stock limitados de campos temperados, assim como um stock limitado de todos os outros biomas. Em média, cerca de 10 por cento de todos os outros biomas permanece hoje em algo como o seu estado nativo. Apenas 1 por cento dos campos temperados permanecem não destruídos. O trigo toma tudo o que precisa.

A oferta de campos temperados jaz no que são hoje os Estados Unidos, o Canadá, os pampas sul-americanos, Nova Zelândia, Austrália, África do Sul, Europa e a extensão asiáticas da planície europeia dentro das estepes sub-siberianas. Isto descreve amplamente o Primeiro Mundo, mundo desenvolvido. Campos temperados constituem não só o habitat do trigo e do bife como também as ilhas do globo de caucasianos, com sobrenomes e línguas europeias. No ano 2000 os países dos campos temperados, os neo-europeus, representavam cerca de 80 por cento de todas as exportações de trigo do mundo, e cerca de 86 por cento de todo comércio. Isto quer dizer que os neo-europeus dirigem a agricultura do mundo. O domínio não se limita aos cereais. Estes países, mais a mãe Europa representavam três quartos de todas as exportações agrícolas do mundo em 1999.

Platão escreveu acerca dos agricultores do seu país: O que agora resta das terras anteriormente ricas é como que o esqueleto de um homem doente. Antigamente, muitas das montanhas eram aráveis. A planícies que estavam repletas de solo rico agora são pântanos. Colinas que outrora estavam cobertas com florestas e produziam pasto abundante agora produzem apenas alimentos para abelhas. Outrora a terra era enriquecida por chuvas anuais, as quais não eram perdidas, como são agora, ao fluírem da terra nua para o mar. O solo era profundo, absorvia e mantinha a água em terra argilosa, e a água que era absorvida nas colinas alimentava ribeiros e água corrente por toda a parte. Agora os santuários abandonados em pontos onde outrora houve ribeiros confirmam que nossa descrição da terra é verdadeira.

O lamento de Platão está enraizado na agricultura do trigo, a qual esgotou o solo do seu país e posteriormente provocou as séries de declínios que empurraram os centros de civilização para Roma, Turquia e Europa ocidental. No século V, contudo, a estratégia do trigo de esgotar e mover-se para a frente deparou-se com o Oceano Atlântico. A agricultura confinada do trigo é como a agricultura do arroz. Ela equilibra suas equações com a fome. No milénio entre 500 e 1500 a Grã-Bretanha sofreu uma grande fome “correctiva” a cada dez anos; houve 75 em França durante o mesmo período. A incidência, contudo, caiu agudamente quando a colonização trouxe um influxo de novos alimentos para a Europa.

As novas terras tinham um efeito ainda maior sobre os próprios colonizadores. Thomas Jefferson, num jantar em Paris, depois de aguentar uma palestra dos seus hospedeiros acerca da natureza rústica, salientou que todos os americanos presentes eram uma boa cabeça mais altos do que os franceses presentes. Na verdade, todos os colonizadores de origem europeia desfrutavam de maior estatura e longevidade, bem como mais baixa taxa de mortalidade infantil — indicadores da melhor nutrição permitida pelo dispêndio do capital acumulado anteriormente no solo virgem.

O LIMITE ATINGIDO EM 1960 E A REVOLUÇÃO VERDE

As fomes pré-coloniais da Europa levantaram a questão: O que aconteceria quando a oferta de terra arável do planeta acabasse? Temos uma resposta clara. Cerca de 1960 a expansão atingiu seus limites e a oferta de terras aráveis não cultivadas chegou a um fim. Nada fora deixado para arar. O que aconteceu foi que os rendimentos dos cereais triplicaram.

A expressão aceite para esta estranha viragem dos acontecimentos é revolução verde, embora fosse mais adequado etiquetá-la como revolução âmbar, porque ela aplicou-se exclusivamente a cereais – trigo, arroz e milho. Autores de plantas consertaram a arquitectura destes grãos de modo a que pudessem ser hiper-carregados com água de irrigação e fertilizantes químicos, especialmente nitrogénio. Esta inovação uniu-se habilmente com a “eficiência” acrescida do sistema industrializado fábrica-fazenda. Com a possível excepção da domesticação do trigo, a revolução verde é a pior coisa que alguma vez já aconteceu no planeta. Para começar, ela rompeu os padrões há muito estabelecidos da vida rural em todo o mundo, movendo um bocado de pessoas não-mais-necessárias para fora da terra e para dentro da mais severa pobreza do mundo. A experiência Do controle de população no mundo em desenvolvimento é agora clara. Não se trata de que pessoas façam mais pessoas em demasia e sim de que elas fazem mais pessoas pobres. No período de 40 anos principiado cerca de 1960, a população do mundo duplicou, somando virtualmente um aumento total de 3 mil milhões às classes mais pobres do mundo, as classes mais fecundas. A forma pela qual a revolução verde elevou aqueles cereais contribuiu enormemente para o boom populacional, e é o peso demográfico que deixa a humanidade na sua presente posição desprotegida (untenable).

Discussões destas, sobre a maioria pobre, são contudo irrelevantes para a situação americana. Nós dizemos que temos pobres aqui, mas quase ninguém neste país vive com menos do que um dólar por dia, a referência global para a pobreza. Isto diferencia uma classe de cerca de 1,3 mil milhões de pessoas, o núcleo duro de um grupo maior de 2 mil milhões de pessoas cronicamente mal nutridas — ou seja, um terço da humanidade. Podemos esquecê-los, como o faz a maior parte dos americanos.

Mais relevante aqui são os métodos da revolução verde, os quais acrescentaram ordens de grandeza à devastação. Ao minerar o ferro para tractores, perfurar o novo petróleo para alimentá-los e fabricar fertilizantes nitrogenados e ao levar a água que chove e dos rios para outras terras, a agricultura estendeu suas fronteiras, seu domínio, a terras que não eram agriculturáveis. Ao mesmo tempo, estendeu suas fronteiras no tempo, recorrendo à energia fóssil, devastando activos do passado.

COMIDA É PETRÓLEO

A suposição comum nestes dias é que passamos em revista nossas armas a fim de assegurar o petróleo, não a comida. Isto parece uma anedota. Sempre, desde que ficámos desprovidos de terra arável, a comida é o petróleo. Toda simples caloria que comemos é suportada por pelo menos uma caloria de petróleo, mais provavelmente dez. Em 1940 a propriedade agrícola média nos Estados Unidos produzia 2,3 calorias de energia alimentar para cada caloria de energia fóssil que utilizava. Em 1974 (o último ano em que alguém examinou de perto esta questão), aquele rácio era 1:1. E isto ameniza os dados do problema, porque ao mesmo tempo que há mais petróleo na nossa comida há menos petróleo no nosso petróleo. Um par de gerações atrás gastávamos um bocado menos energia ao perfurar, bombear e distribuir do que gastamos agora. Na década de 1940 obtínhamos cerca de 100 barris de petróleo de retorno por cada barril de petróleo que gastávamos para obte-lo. Hoje, cada barril investido no processo retorna apenas dez, um cálculo que deixa de incluir o combustível queimado pelas viaturas Hummer e helicópteros Blackhawks que utilizamos para manter o acesso ao petróleo do Iraque.

David Pimentel, um perito em alimentos e energia da Cornell University, estimou que se todo o mundo comesse da forma como os Estados Unidos comem, a humanidade exauriria todas as reservas globais conhecidas de combustível fóssil em apenas cerca de sete anos. Pimentel tem os seus detractores. Alguns acusam-no de afastar-se de outros cálculos em até 30 por cento. Muito bem. Ponha dez anos.

Os fertilizantes põem uma linda bomba em circulação, uma lição de química que Timothy McVeigh [2] deu no Edifício Federal Alfred P. Murrah, em Oklahoma City, no ano de 1995 – não é um assunto sem importância, pois a revolução verde tornou os fertilizantes nitrogenados omnipresentes em alguns dos mais violentos e desesperados cantos do mundo. Ainda assim, há mais para examinar do que a menos sensacional química do nitrogénio.

A quimiofobia dos tempos modernos exclui o medo dos simples elementos da tabela periódica dos elementos. Circulamos petições, realizamos audiências, lançamos sítios web, compramos e vendemos legisladores graças ao respeito que inspiram os compostos orgânicos polissilábicos – bifenis policlorinatados, polivinis, DDT, 2-4d, essa espécie de coisas — mas não com o simples carbono ou nitrogénio. Não que a utilização agrícola da química mais enfeitada seja benigna — uma criança nascida num condado rural produtor de trigo nos Estados Unidos tem cerca do dobro de probabilidade de sofrer defeitos de nascimento do que uma nascida num lugar rural que não produza trigo, um efeito que os investigadores atribuem aos herbicidas clorofenoxis. Focar a poluição dos pesticidas, contudo, omite o pior dos poluentes. Esqueça os polissilábicos orgânicos. É o nitrogénio – o manancial de fertilidade ao qual está confiado todo o Paraíso, a obsessão dos jardineiros de quintal e de agricultores suburbanos – que nós devemos temer mais.

Aqueles que modelam o nosso planeta como um organismo assim o fazem na base de que a terra parece respirar – ela prospera ao converter uma curta lista de elementos básicos de um composto no seguinte, assim como nossos corpos fazem o ciclo do oxigénio em dióxido de carbono e as plantas do dióxido de carbono em oxigénio. De facto, dois dos mais fundamentais humores do planeta são oxigénio e dióxido de carbono. O outro é o nitrogénio.

O nitrogénio pode ser libertado do seu estado “fixo” como um sólido no solo através de processos naturais que lhe permitem circular livremente na atmosfera. Isto também pode ser feito artificialmente. Na verdade, os humanos agora contribuem com mais nitrogénio para ciclo do nitrogénio do que o faz o próprio planeta. Isto é, os humanos duplicaram a quantidade de nitrogénio em jogo.

Isto levou a um desequilíbrio. É mais fácil criar fertilizante nitrogenado do que aplicá-lo uniformemente pelos campos. Quando agricultores despejam nitrogénio numa plantação, grande parte é desperdiçada. Ele corre para dentro da água e do solo, onde reage quimicamente com a vizinhança para formar novos compostos ou corre para fertilizar outra coisa, em algum outro lugar.

Esta reacção química, chamada acidificação, é nociva e contribui significativamente para a chuva ácida. Um do compostos produzidos pela acidificação é o óxido nitroso (nitrous oxide), o qual agrava o efeito estufa. O crescimento das plantas normalmente contrabalança o aquecimento global ao absorver dióxido de carbono, mas o nitrogénio sobre os campos agrícolas mais o metano da vegetação decomposta torna todo hectare cultivado, assim como todo hectare da auto-estrada de Los Angeles, um contribuinte líquido para o aquecimento global.

A fertilização é igualmente preocupante. A chuva e a água de irrigação inevitavelmente lavam o nitrogénio dos campos para os riachos e correntezas, o qual flui para dentro de rios, os quais fluem para dentro do oceano. Isto explica porque o Rio Mississipi, que drena o Cinturão de Milho (Corn Belt) do país, é uma catástrofe ambiental. O nitrogénio fertiliza artificialmente grandes florescências de algas que ao cresceram sugam todo o oxigénio da água, uma condição que os biólogos chamam de anoxia, que significa “oxigénio esgotado”. Aqui não é preciso calcular efeitos a longo prazo, porque a vida em tais lugares não tem longo prazo: todas as coisas morrem imediatamente. Os eflúvios do Rio Mississipi, pesadamente fertilizados, criaram uma zona morta no Golfo do México do tamanho de Nova Jersey.

A maior cultura da América, o grão de milho, é completamente intragável. É matéria-prima para uma indústria que fabrica substitutos alimentares. Da mesma forma, você não pode comer trigo não processado. Você certamente não pode comer feno. Pode comer feijões de soja não processados, mas a maior parte de nós não o faz. Estas quatro culturas cobrem 82 por cento da terra agrícola americana. A agricultura neste país não é para alimentos; é para mercadorias que exigem o dispêndio de ainda mais energia para tornar-se comida.

Cerca de dois terços do grão de milho americano leva a etiqueta “processado”, significando isto que é moído e além disso refinado para alimentação ou utilizações industriais. Mais de 45 por cento dele torna-se açúcar, especialmente adoçante com alto teor de frutose do milho, o ingrediente chave em três quartos de todos os alimentos processados, especialmente em bebidas doces, o alimento dos pobres e das classes trabalhadoras da América. Não é uma coincidência que a pandemia americana de obesidade siga o aumento de cinco vezes na produção de xarope de milho desde que Archer Daniels Midland desenvolveu uma versão com alta frutose daquilo no princípio da década de setenta. Nem tão pouco é uma coincidência que a praga seleccione os pobres, os quais comem a maior parte da comida processada.

Isto começou com a industrialização na Inglaterra vitoriana. O império estava então cheio do açúcar das plantações nas colónias. Ao mesmo tempo as cidades estavam cheias de trabalhadores fabris. Não havia boa maneira de alimentá-los. E assim nasceu a pausa do chá da tarde, o chá consistindo primariamente de água quente e açúcar. Se os trabalhadores estivessem bem de vida, eles também podiam poupar pão com geleia pesadamente açucarada – a industrialização movida a açúcar. Houve um aumento de 500 por cento na capitação do consumo de açúcar na Grã Bretanha entre 1860 e 1890, um tempo em que a expectativa de vida de um trabalhador fabril masculino era de 17 anos. No fim do séculos o britânico médio estava a obter cerca de um sexto da sua nutrição total do açúcar, exactamente a mesma porcentagem que os americanos obtêm hoje – o dobro do que recomendam os nutricionistas.

Há um outro assunto de energia a considerar aqui, contudo. A trituração, moagem, humidificação, secagem e assadura de um pequeno-almoço de cereal exige cerca de quatro calorias de energia para cada caloria de energia alimentar que produz. Um saco com duas libras (0,9 kg) de cereal queima a energia de meio galão (1,89 litro)de gasolina na sua fabricação. Tudo em conjunto, a indústria de processamento de alimentos nos Estados Unidos utiliza cerca de dez calorias de energia de combustíveis fósseis para cada caloria de energia alimentar que produz.

Este número não inclui o combustível utilizado no transporte do alimento da fábrica para a loja próxima de si, ou o combustível utilizado por milhões de pessoas a conduzirem para milhares de lojas de super descontos no extremo da cidade, onde a terra é barata. Parece, contudo, que o ciclo do milho está prestes a fechar um círculo completo. Se se formasse uma coligação bipartidária de agricultores e legisladores estaduais – e parece que isso acontecerá – dentro em breve compraremos gasolina que contem o dobro do álcool combustível actual. O álcool combustível já se perfila em segundo lugar na utilização de milho processado nos Estados Unidos, atrás apenas dos adoçantes. De acordo com um conjunto de cálculos, gastamos mais calorias de energia de combustíveis fósseis a fabricar etanol do que ganhamos com isto. O Departamento da Agricultura afirma que o rácio está mais próximo de um galão de um quarto de etanol para cada galão de combustível fóssil que investimos. Aquele Departamento chama a isto uma pechincha, porque o gasool (gasohol) é um “combustível limpo”. Esta afirmação de limpeza está em discussão ao nível do tubo de escape e ela certamente ignora a zona morta no Golfo do México, a poluição dos pesticidas e o nevoeiro de gases globais a acumularem-se sobre todo o campo agrícola. Nem esta afirmação limpa a consciência; alguns ainda podem ficar inquietos ao saberem que as exigências dos nossos SUVs [3] por combustíveis competem com as exigências dos pobres por cereais.

Os comedores de verduras, especialmente os vegetarianos, advogam comerem da parte baixa da cadeia alimentar, uma simples questão de fluxo de energia. Comer uma cenoura dá àquele que a ingere toda a energia da cenoura, mas alimentar uma galinha com cenouras e então comer a galinha reduz a energia num factor de dez. A galinha desperdiça alguma energia, armazena alguma como penas, ossos e outras coisas incomestíveis, e utiliza a maior parte dela apenas para viver o tempo suficiente até ser comida. Como uma regra prática, aquele factor de dez aplica-se a cada nível da cadeia alimentar, razão porque alguns peixes, tal como o atum, podem ser um horror nisto tudo. O atum é um predador secundário, significando isto que não só não come plantas como come outros peixes que eles próprios comem outros peixes, acrescentando um zero ao multiplicador a cada passo, facilmente uma centena de vezes, mais provavelmente um milhar de vezes menos eficiente do que comer uma planta.

Isto está muito bem na medida em que funcionar, mas o caso dos vegetarianos pode ser decomposto em alguns pormenores. Em questões de moral, os vegetarianos afirmam que os seus hábitos são mais benévolos para com os animais, embora seja difícil ver como exterminar 99 por cento do habitat da vida selvagem, como a agricultura fez no Iowa, seja benévolo. No Michigan rural, por exemplo, os cultivadores de batatas têm uma táctica peculiar para tratar dos cervos predadores. Eles dão-lhes tiros na barriga com rifles de pequeno calibre, na esperança de que os cervos se arrastem para as florestas e morram num lugar onde não empestem os campos de batatas.

Pondo de lado os direitos do animais, os vegetarianos podem perder no argumento da energia ao comerem alimento processado, com suas dez calorias de energia fóssil por cada caloria de energia alimentar produzida. A questão, então, é: Será que comer alimento processado como burgers de soja ou leite de soja anula os benefícios energéticos do vegetarianismo, o que quer dizer, será que posso comer minhas costeletas de carneiro em paz? Talvez. Se eu tiver tido a devida diligência, terei descoberto que o carneiro particular que estou a comer era tanto local como alimentado com erva, dois factores que naturalmente reduzem em muito a energia embebida numa refeição. Sei de ranchos aqui no Montana, por exemplo, onde o carneiro come ervas nativas sob circunstâncias estritamente controladas – sem agricultura, sem arados, sem milho, sem nitrogénio. Os recursos não foram despojados. Não posso comer a relva directamente. Isto pode prosseguir. Há poucos nichos como este no sistema. É da responsabilidade individual de cada um descobrir tais nichos.

As probabilidades, contudo, são de que qualquer comedor de carne chegará ao fim popular deste argumento, especialmente nos Estados Unidos. Tomemos o caso do bife. O gado pasta, de modo que em teoria poderia viver como o carneiro alimentado a erva. Algumas culturas de gado – aquelas na América do Sul e no México, por exemplo – aperfeiçoaram maravilhosas culinárias baseadas no bife alimentado a erva. Este não é o nosso hábito nos Estados Unidos, e é simplesmente uma questão de hábito. Oitenta por cento do cereal que os Estados Unidos produzem são para a pecuária. Setenta e oito por cento de todo o nosso bife vem de gado estabulado, onde ele come cereal, principalmente milho e trigo. Assim como a maior parte dos nossos porcos e galinhas. O gado passa a sua vida adulta comprimido ombro a ombro num espaço não muito maior do que os seus corpos, sendo alimentado com cereal e um fluxo constante de antibióticos para impedir as doenças que esta espécie de confinamento inevitavelmente engendra. O estrume é rico em nitrogénio e outrora providenciava fertilizante para a agricultura. Os resíduos, contudo, agora são removidos para longe dos campos agrícolas, pois simplesmente não é “eficiente” transportá-los para campos de milho. Isto é desperdício. Exala metano, um gás com efeito estufa. Polui fluxos de água. Desta forma, gastam-se trinta e cinco calorias de combustível fóssil para fabricar uma caloria de bife, sessenta e oito para fabricar uma caloria de porco.

Mais ainda, estes animais fazem algo que nós não podemos. Eles convertem carbohidratos de cereais em proteína de alta qualidade. Tudo bem, excepto que a produção per capita de proteína nos Estados Unidos é cerca do dobro daquela que um adulto médio necessita diariamente. O excesso não pode ser armazenado como proteína no corpo humano e é simplesmente convertido em gordura. Isto é o resultado final de um sistema fábrica-agricultura que surge como um modo de viver, monumento em escala continental a Rube Goldberg [4] , uma repetição em negro do milagre do pão e dos peixes. A produtividade da pradaria é perdida para o cereal, a produtividade do cereal é perdida no gado, a proteína do gado é perdida na gordura humana – tudo subsidiado pelo governo federal com cerca de US$ 15 mil milhões por ano, dois terços dos quais vão directamente para apenas duas culturas: milho e trigo.

Isto explica porque o perito em energia David Pimentel está tão preocupado com a adopção de métodos americanos pelo resto do mundo. Tem de estar, pois o resto do mundo está a adoptá-lo. O México agora destina 45 por cento do seu cereal para o gado, um salto em relação aos 5 por cento de 1960. O Egipto passou de 3 por cento para 31 por cento no mesmo período. E a China, com um sexto da população mundial, subiu de 8 por cento para 26 por cento. Todos estes lugares têm pessoas pobres que poderiam utilizar o cereal, mas elas não têm dinheiro para comprá-lo.

Vivo entre alces e aprendi a respeitá-los. Uma noite de luar no fim do último inverno olhei pela janela do meu quarto e vi cerca de vinte deles a pastarem um campo de erva do tamanho de uma sala. Exactamente aquele pequeno bocado entre hectares de outras espécies de relva da pradaria nativa. Por que aquelas espécies e apenas aquelas espécies de relva naquela noite no pior do inverno quando a ameaça à sua sobrevivência era a maior? Que nutrientes mágicos só esta espécie precisava? O que um animal selvagem sabia que nós não sabíamos? Penso que precisamos deste conhecimento.

Alimentação é política. Sendo este o caso, votei duas vezes em 2002. No dia seguinte ao da eleição, com um humor realmente lúgubre, escalei a montanha por trás da minha casa e descobri uma pequena manada de alces a pastar ervas nativas na manhã ensolarada. O meu respeito por estas criaturas ao longo de anos tornou-se tão grande que naquela manhã que não hesitei e fui directamente à minha tarefa: apanhar um cartucho e despejá-lo sobre uma alce fêmea, minha fonte anual de proteínas para a casa. Votei com a minha arma preferida – um acto não de todo incomum neste mundo, sobretudo, penso, devido ao modo como fomos alimentados na infância. Posso ver porque ele é popular. Tal voto tem uma certa influência satisfatória e sentido de finalidade. O meu bocado particular de violência, contudo, é mais satisfatório, penso, do que a restante confusão política do globo. Utilizei um rifle a fim de optar por não fazer parte de um sistema insano. Matei, mas assim fez você quando comprou aquele pacote de burger, mesmo quando comprou o pacote de burger tofu. Matei, e então os alces restantes prosseguiram, tal como o fizeram as ervas, os pássaros, as árvores, os coiotes, os leões da montanha e os besouros, a produtividade fundamental de um sistema natural intacto, todo ele prosseguiu.

Notas
1- Dust Bowl, Cinturão do Pó, área das Grandes Planícies (Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado e Novo México) mais afectada pela grande seca da década de 1930.
2- Fascista estadunidense que em 1995 fez explodir um edifício governamental no Oklahoma.
3- Sport Utility Vehicle.
4- Cartoonista famoso pelos seus desenhos de máquinas malucas. Ver http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rube_Goldberg .

 

Fuente: Resistir.info

O petróleo que comemos

Seguindo a cadeia alimentar até o Iraque

Por Richard Manning

inglês | português

O segredo de uma grande riqueza com nenhuma fonte óbvia é algum crime esquecido porque foi cometido de modo impecável.
— Balzac

A regra dos jornalistas diz: siga o dinheiro. Esta regra, contudo, não é realmente axiomática e sim um corolário pois o dinheiro, como até o nosso vice-presidente poderá confirmar, é na verdade um meio de ir ao encalço da energia. Nós seguiremos a energia.

Aprendemos em criança que não há almoços gratuitos; que não se pode obter alguma coisa a partir do nada; que o que sobe deve descer, e assim por diante. A versão científica destas verdades é apenas ligeiramente mais complexa. Como descobriu James Prescott Joule no século XIX, há apenas um tanto de energia. Você pode mudá-la de movimento para calor, de calor para luz, mas nunca haverá mais nem nunca haverá menos dela. A conservação da energia não é uma opção, é um facto. Esta é a primeira lei da termodinâmica.

Ainda que os humanos sejam especiais, não podemos fugir às regras. Todos os animais comem plantas ou comem animais que comem plantas. Isto é a cadeia alimentar, e a atracção é a capacidade única das plantas de transformar a luz do sol em energia armazenada sob a forma de carbohidratos, o combustível básico de todos os animais. A fotosíntese da luz do sol é o único meio de fabricar este combustível. Não há alternativa para a energia das plantas, assim como não há alternativa para o oxigénio. Os resultados da eliminação da energia que obtemos das plantas podem não ser tão súbitos como o do corte do oxigénio, mas eles são inevitáveis.

Os cientistas dão um nome à quantidade total da massa de plantas criada pela Terra num dado ano, que é o orçamento total para a vida. Eles chamam a isto a “produtividade primária” do planeta. Houve duas tentativas de descobrir como é gasta tal produtividade, uma de um grupo na Universidade de Stanford e outra de uma contagem independente efectuada pelo biólogo Stuar Pimm. Ambas concluem que nós humanos, uma espécie única entre milhões, consumimos 40 por cento da produtividade primária da Terra, 40 por cento de tudo o que há. Este simples número pode explicar porque a actual taxa de extinção é 1000 vezes [maior] daquela que existiu antes do domínio humano sobre o planeta. Nós 6 mil milhões simplesmente roubámos a comida, os ricos entre nós roubaram um bocado mais do que os outros.

A energia não pode ser criada ou eliminada, mas pode ser concentrada. Este é o contexto mais amplo e profundo que explica um memorando sobre segurança nacional escrito por George Kennan 1948, quando era responsável por um comité de planeamento do Departamento de Estado. Aparentemente é acerca da política asiática mas na verdade é acerca de como os Estados Unidos deveriam actuar no seu novo papel de força dominante da Terra. “Temos cerca de 50 por cento da riqueza do mundo mas apenas 6,3 por cento da sua população”, escreveu Kennan. “Em tal situação, não poderemos deixar de ser objecto de inveja e ressentimento. Nossa tarefa real no período vindouro é conceber um padrão de relacionamento que nos permita manter esta posição de disparidade sem prejudicar a nossa segurança nacional. Para conseguir isso teremos de dispensar quaisquer sentimentalismos e devaneios; nossa atenção terá concentrar-se em todos os aspectos dos objectivos nacionais imediatos. Precisamos não nos enganar a nós próprios com a ideia de que podemos permitir-nos hoje o luxo do altruísmo e da beneficência mundial”. “Não está longe o dia”, concluiu Kennan, “em que teremos de tratar [o mundo] em termos de conceitos de poder directo”.

ARROZ, MILHO, TRIGO

Se você seguir a energia, acabará finalmente num campo algures. Os humanos empenham-se num vertiginoso conjunto de artifícios e indústria. No entanto, mais de dois terços da humanidade depende dos resultados da produtividade primária da agricultura, dois terços do quais por sua vez consistem em três plantas: arroz, trigo e milho. Nos 10 mil anos decorridos desde que os humanos domesticaram estes grãos, o seu status permaneceu em toda plenitude, mais provavelmente porque os mesmos são capazes de armazenar energia solar em maços densos e transportáveis de carbohidratos de uma forma única. Eles são para a vegetação mundial aquilo que um barril de petróleo refinado representa para os hidrocarbonetos mundiais. Na verdade, com excepção dos hidrocarbonetos, são a mais concentrada forma de riqueza verdadeira — a energia do sol — encontrável sobre o planeta.

Como reconheceu Kennan, entretanto, a manutenção de uma tal concentração de riqueza muitas vezes exige acções violentas. A agricultura é um experimento humano recente. Durante a maior parte da história humana vivemos da colecta ou da matança de uma vasta variedade de bens da natureza. A razão porque os humanos poderão ter mudado esta abordagem para as complexidades da agricultura é uma questão interessante e debatida há muito, especialmente porque a evidência esquelética indica claramente que os agricultores primitivos eram alimentados mais pobremente, mais sujeitos a doenças e deformados do que os seus contemporâneos caçadores-colectores. A agricultura não melhorou a maior parte das vidas. A evidência que melhor aponta para a resposta, penso eu, jaz na diferença entre as aldeias agrícolas primitivas e as suas equivalentes pré-agrícolas — a presença não apenas de grão mas de celeiros e, de forma mais reveladora, de apenas umas poucas casas significativamente maiores e mais enfeitadas do que todas as outras anexas àqueles celeiros. A agricultura era não tanto uma questão de comida e sim uma questão de acumulação de riqueza. Ela beneficiou alguns humanos, e aquelas pessoas ficaram nas chefias desde então.

A domesticação também foi uma mudança radical na distribuição de riqueza no interior da vegetação. As plantas podem dispender o seu rendimento solar de vários modos. A estratégia dominante e prudente é atribuir a maior parte delas à construção de raízes, troncos, cascas — uma carteira de investimentos conservadora que permita à planta melhor reunir energia e sobreviver nos anos maus. Além disso, ao viver em diversas posturas (um dado bocado de pradaria nativa talvez contenha umas 200 espécies de plantas), estas plantas perenes proporcionam serviços para outras, tais como reter água, protegerem-se umas às outras do vento, e fixar nitrogénio livre do ar para utilizar como fertilizante. A diversidade permite a um sistema “promover a sua própria fertilidade”, para usar uma frase do agrónomo visionário Wes Jackson. Isto é a norma mundial das plantas.

Há um grupo muito estreito de plantas anuais, contudo, que crescem em manchas de espécies únicas e armazenam quase todo o seu rendimento enquanto semente, num fardo compactado de carbohidratos facilmente exploráveis por comedores de sementes como nós próprios. Sob circunstâncias normais, esta estratégia de por todos os ovos num cesto é uma ideia tola para uma planta. Mas não durante catástrofes tais como inundações, incêndios e erupções vulcânicas. Tais catástrofes varrem as comunidades de plantas estabelecidas e criam oportunidades para o vento espalhar sementes portadoras de espírito empresarial. Não é por acidente que não importa onde a agricultura tenha florescido no globo, isto sempre aconteceu próximo a rios. Pode-se assumir, como muitos o fizeram, que isto se verifica porque as plantas precisam da água ou de nutrientes. Na maioria das vezes não é verdade. Elas precisam do poder da inundação, a qual limpa paisagens e afasta competidores. Não é por acaso, penso, que a agricultura cresce independentemente e simultaneamente por todo o globo assim que termina a última era glacial, um tempo de enorme reviravolta quando o gelo glacial fundiu-se formando grandes lagos que criaram ondas de erosão. Foi um tempo de catástrofe.

O milho, o arroz e o trigo são especialmente adaptados à catástrofe. Este é o seu nicho. No esquema natural das coisas, uma catástrofe criaria um quadro em branco, um solo nu, o que era bom para elas. Então, sob circunstâncias normais, a sucessão rapidamente preencheria aquela nicho. As plantas anuais colonizariam. As suas raízes estabilizariam o solo, acumulariam matéria orgânica, proporcionariam cobertura. Finalmente o nicho catastrófico fechar-se-ia. A agricultura é o processo de lavrar aquele nicho aberto muitas e muitas vezes. É uma catástrofe anual artificial e exige o equivalente a três ou quatro toneladas de TNT por acre (4047 m 2 ) numa moderna propriedade agrícola americana. Os campos de Iowa exigem a energia de 4000 bombas de Nagasaki por ano.

Quase toda Iowa agora é campo. Pequenas pradarias subsistem, aquilo a que os iowanos chamam um “selo postal” remanescente, muito provavelmente a confinar com um campo de milho. Isto permite uma observação. Passeie da pradaria para o campo e provavelmente descerá cerca de seis pés (1,8 m), como se a terra houvesse sido roubada debaixo de si. Relatos de colonizadores que conquistaram a pradaria mencionam um som, uma série de estouros, como tiros de pistolas, o som de robustas raízes a romperem-se perante as lâminas do arado (moldboard plow). Um esbulho estava em andamento.

Quanto dizemos que o solo é rico, isto não é uma metáfora. Ele é tão rico em energia quanto um poço de petróleo. Uma pradaria converte energia para flores, raízes e caules, os quais por sua vez retornam ao solo como matéria orgânica morta. As camadas do topo do solo acumularam um rico repositório de energia, um banco. Um campo agrícola apropria-se daquela energia, transforma-a em sementes que podemos comer. Grande parte da energia move-se da terra para os anéis de gordura em torno das nossas nucas e cinturas. E muita da energia é simplesmente desperdiçada, um rasto de dólares a escapar do saco do ladrão.

Já mencionei que nós humanos tomamos 40 por cento da produtividade primária do globo a cada ano. Você pode ter suposto que nós e o nosso gado comemos todo aquele volume, mas não é o caso. Parte daquele total – quase um terço dele – é o potencial da massa de plantas perdidas quando florestas são derrubadas para a agricultura ou quando florestas de chuva tropical são cortadas para serem transformadas em pasto ou quando arados destroem a trama profunda de raízes de pradaria que mantêm todo o negócio junto, disparando a erosão. O Dust Bowl [1] não foi um acidente da natureza. Uma pradaria de pasto em funcionamento produz mais biomassa por ano do que o faz o mais tecnologicamente avançado dos campo de trigo. O problema é que na maior parte sob a forma de uma erva que os humanos não podem comer. Assim, substituímos a pradaria com a nossa própria erva preferida, o trigo. Não importa que alimentemos a maior do nosso gado com cereais, e que o gado fique perfeitamente satisfeito em comer ervas nativas. E não importa que ali provavelmente houvesse mais bisontes produzidos naturalmente sobre as Grandes Planícies antes da agricultura do que todo o bife que os agricultores hoje criam na mesma área. Nossos ancestrais achavam preferível retirar a energia do solo e moverem-se quando ela desaparecia.

Hoje fazemos o mesmo, só que agora, quando o cofre está vazio, nós o enchemos outra vez com nova energia na forma de fertilizantes ricos em petróleo. O petróleo é produtividade primária anual armazenada como hidrocarbonetos, um fundo fiduciário (trust fund) de pouco valor, acumulado ao longo de muito milhares de anos. Em média, gasta-se 5,5 galões (20,8 litros) de energia fóssil para restaurar o valor da fertilidade anual perdida num acre (4047 m 2 ) de terra erodida – em 1997 queimámos directamente o valor de mais de 400 anos de antiga produtividade fossilizada, a maior parte dela proveniente de lugares distantes. Quando a terra debaixo de Iowa encolhe-se, está a ser globalizada.

Seis mil anos antes de agricultores (sodbusters) irromperem em Iowa, seus ancestrais caucasianos irromperam na planície húngara, uma área a noroeste das Montanhas do Cáucaso. Os arqueólogos denominam esta tribo como LBK, abreviatura para linearbandkeramik, a palavra alemã que descreve a cerâmica inconfundível que marca a sua ocupação da Europa. Os antropólogos chamam-nos o povo trigo-bife, um nome que liga melhor aqueles povos antigos ao longo do Danúbio com os meus companheiros de Montana na parte alta do Rio Missouri. Estes proto-europeus tinham um conjunto completo de plantas e animais domesticados, mas o trigo e o bife dominavam. Todos os domesticados provinham de uma área ao longo do que é agora a fronteira da Iraque-Síria-Turquia que orla as Montanhas Zagros. Este foi o centro de domesticação das principais plantações e gado vivo do mundo ocidental, o marco zero da agricultura catastrófica.

Dois outros tipos de agricultura catastrófica evoluíram aproximadamente ao mesmo tempo, uma centrada sobre o arroz no que é agora a China e a Índia e outra centrada sobre o milho e as batatas na América Central e do Sul. O arroz é tropical e sua expansão depende da água, de modo que desenvolveu-se apenas em planícies inundáveis, estuários e pântanos. A agricultura do milho era tão voraz quanto a do trigo; os aztecas podiam ser tão brutais e imperialistas quanto os romanos ou os britânicos, mas as culturas do milho entraram em colapso com a carnificina da conquista espanhola. O próprio milho simplesmente juntou-se à coligação do povo do trigo-bife. O trigo era o construtor do império; seus reduzidos factos botânicos ditavam o movimento e a violência que conhecemos como imperialismo.

O povo do trigo-bife passou rapidamente através das planícies da Europa ocidental, em menos de 300 anos, uma conquista que alguns arqueólogos chamam de “blitzkrieg”. Uma raça diferente de humanos, os Cromagnons – caçadores-colectores, não agricultores – vivia naquelas planícies ao tempo. Sua arte em cavernas em lugares tais como Lascaux testemunha o seu refinamento e ligação profunda à fauna selvagem. Eles provavelmente realizavam a maior da sua caça e colecta em terras altas e em rios, lugares que os agricultores do trigo não necessitavam, o que sugere a possibilidade da coexistência. Contudo, não foi o que aconteceu. Tanto a evidência genética como a linguística indica que os agricultores mataram os caçadores. O povo basco é provavelmente o único remanescente que descende dos Cromagnons, o único sinal.

Os sítios arqueológicos do período de caçadores-colectores contêm pontas de lança afiadas que originalmente pertenciam aos agricultores, e podemos imaginar que não eram bens comerciais. Um grupo de antropólogos concluiu: “A evidência da extensão ocidental dos LBK deixa pouco espaço para qualquer outra conclusão a não ser que as interacções LBK-Mesolíticas foram na melhor das hipóteses gélidas e na pior hostis”. Os sobreviventes do mundo do Pés Pretos, Sioux Assiniboine, Incas e Maori provavelmente têm a melhor ideia do que foi a natureza destas interacções.

O trigo é temperado e prefere campos arados. O globo tem um stock limitados de campos temperados, assim como um stock limitado de todos os outros biomas. Em média, cerca de 10 por cento de todos os outros biomas permanece hoje em algo como o seu estado nativo. Apenas 1 por cento dos campos temperados permanecem não destruídos. O trigo toma tudo o que precisa.

A oferta de campos temperados jaz no que são hoje os Estados Unidos, o Canadá, os pampas sul-americanos, Nova Zelândia, Austrália, África do Sul, Europa e a extensão asiáticas da planície europeia dentro das estepes sub-siberianas. Isto descreve amplamente o Primeiro Mundo, mundo desenvolvido. Campos temperados constituem não só o habitat do trigo e do bife como também as ilhas do globo de caucasianos, com sobrenomes e línguas europeias. No ano 2000 os países dos campos temperados, os neo-europeus, representavam cerca de 80 por cento de todas as exportações de trigo do mundo, e cerca de 86 por cento de todo comércio. Isto quer dizer que os neo-europeus dirigem a agricultura do mundo. O domínio não se limita aos cereais. Estes países, mais a mãe Europa representavam três quartos de todas as exportações agrícolas do mundo em 1999.

Platão escreveu acerca dos agricultores do seu país: O que agora resta das terras anteriormente ricas é como que o esqueleto de um homem doente. Antigamente, muitas das montanhas eram aráveis. A planícies que estavam repletas de solo rico agora são pântanos. Colinas que outrora estavam cobertas com florestas e produziam pasto abundante agora produzem apenas alimentos para abelhas. Outrora a terra era enriquecida por chuvas anuais, as quais não eram perdidas, como são agora, ao fluírem da terra nua para o mar. O solo era profundo, absorvia e mantinha a água em terra argilosa, e a água que era absorvida nas colinas alimentava ribeiros e água corrente por toda a parte. Agora os santuários abandonados em pontos onde outrora houve ribeiros confirmam que nossa descrição da terra é verdadeira.

O lamento de Platão está enraizado na agricultura do trigo, a qual esgotou o solo do seu país e posteriormente provocou as séries de declínios que empurraram os centros de civilização para Roma, Turquia e Europa ocidental. No século V, contudo, a estratégia do trigo de esgotar e mover-se para a frente deparou-se com o Oceano Atlântico. A agricultura confinada do trigo é como a agricultura do arroz. Ela equilibra suas equações com a fome. No milénio entre 500 e 1500 a Grã-Bretanha sofreu uma grande fome “correctiva” a cada dez anos; houve 75 em França durante o mesmo período. A incidência, contudo, caiu agudamente quando a colonização trouxe um influxo de novos alimentos para a Europa.

As novas terras tinham um efeito ainda maior sobre os próprios colonizadores. Thomas Jefferson, num jantar em Paris, depois de aguentar uma palestra dos seus hospedeiros acerca da natureza rústica, salientou que todos os americanos presentes eram uma boa cabeça mais altos do que os franceses presentes. Na verdade, todos os colonizadores de origem europeia desfrutavam de maior estatura e longevidade, bem como mais baixa taxa de mortalidade infantil — indicadores da melhor nutrição permitida pelo dispêndio do capital acumulado anteriormente no solo virgem.

O LIMITE ATINGIDO EM 1960 E A REVOLUÇÃO VERDE

As fomes pré-coloniais da Europa levantaram a questão: O que aconteceria quando a oferta de terra arável do planeta acabasse? Temos uma resposta clara. Cerca de 1960 a expansão atingiu seus limites e a oferta de terras aráveis não cultivadas chegou a um fim. Nada fora deixado para arar. O que aconteceu foi que os rendimentos dos cereais triplicaram.

A expressão aceite para esta estranha viragem dos acontecimentos é revolução verde, embora fosse mais adequado etiquetá-la como revolução âmbar, porque ela aplicou-se exclusivamente a cereais – trigo, arroz e milho. Autores de plantas consertaram a arquitectura destes grãos de modo a que pudessem ser hiper-carregados com água de irrigação e fertilizantes químicos, especialmente nitrogénio. Esta inovação uniu-se habilmente com a “eficiência” acrescida do sistema industrializado fábrica-fazenda. Com a possível excepção da domesticação do trigo, a revolução verde é a pior coisa que alguma vez já aconteceu no planeta. Para começar, ela rompeu os padrões há muito estabelecidos da vida rural em todo o mundo, movendo um bocado de pessoas não-mais-necessárias para fora da terra e para dentro da mais severa pobreza do mundo. A experiência Do controle de população no mundo em desenvolvimento é agora clara. Não se trata de que pessoas façam mais pessoas em demasia e sim de que elas fazem mais pessoas pobres. No período de 40 anos principiado cerca de 1960, a população do mundo duplicou, somando virtualmente um aumento total de 3 mil milhões às classes mais pobres do mundo, as classes mais fecundas. A forma pela qual a revolução verde elevou aqueles cereais contribuiu enormemente para o boom populacional, e é o peso demográfico que deixa a humanidade na sua presente posição desprotegida (untenable).

Discussões destas, sobre a maioria pobre, são contudo irrelevantes para a situação americana. Nós dizemos que temos pobres aqui, mas quase ninguém neste país vive com menos do que um dólar por dia, a referência global para a pobreza. Isto diferencia uma classe de cerca de 1,3 mil milhões de pessoas, o núcleo duro de um grupo maior de 2 mil milhões de pessoas cronicamente mal nutridas — ou seja, um terço da humanidade. Podemos esquecê-los, como o faz a maior parte dos americanos.

Mais relevante aqui são os métodos da revolução verde, os quais acrescentaram ordens de grandeza à devastação. Ao minerar o ferro para tractores, perfurar o novo petróleo para alimentá-los e fabricar fertilizantes nitrogenados e ao levar a água que chove e dos rios para outras terras, a agricultura estendeu suas fronteiras, seu domínio, a terras que não eram agriculturáveis. Ao mesmo tempo, estendeu suas fronteiras no tempo, recorrendo à energia fóssil, devastando activos do passado.

COMIDA É PETRÓLEO

A suposição comum nestes dias é que passamos em revista nossas armas a fim de assegurar o petróleo, não a comida. Isto parece uma anedota. Sempre, desde que ficámos desprovidos de terra arável, a comida é o petróleo. Toda simples caloria que comemos é suportada por pelo menos uma caloria de petróleo, mais provavelmente dez. Em 1940 a propriedade agrícola média nos Estados Unidos produzia 2,3 calorias de energia alimentar para cada caloria de energia fóssil que utilizava. Em 1974 (o último ano em que alguém examinou de perto esta questão), aquele rácio era 1:1. E isto ameniza os dados do problema, porque ao mesmo tempo que há mais petróleo na nossa comida há menos petróleo no nosso petróleo. Um par de gerações atrás gastávamos um bocado menos energia ao perfurar, bombear e distribuir do que gastamos agora. Na década de 1940 obtínhamos cerca de 100 barris de petróleo de retorno por cada barril de petróleo que gastávamos para obte-lo. Hoje, cada barril investido no processo retorna apenas dez, um cálculo que deixa de incluir o combustível queimado pelas viaturas Hummer e helicópteros Blackhawks que utilizamos para manter o acesso ao petróleo do Iraque.

David Pimentel, um perito em alimentos e energia da Cornell University, estimou que se todo o mundo comesse da forma como os Estados Unidos comem, a humanidade exauriria todas as reservas globais conhecidas de combustível fóssil em apenas cerca de sete anos. Pimentel tem os seus detractores. Alguns acusam-no de afastar-se de outros cálculos em até 30 por cento. Muito bem. Ponha dez anos.

Os fertilizantes põem uma linda bomba em circulação, uma lição de química que Timothy McVeigh [2] deu no Edifício Federal Alfred P. Murrah, em Oklahoma City, no ano de 1995 – não é um assunto sem importância, pois a revolução verde tornou os fertilizantes nitrogenados omnipresentes em alguns dos mais violentos e desesperados cantos do mundo. Ainda assim, há mais para examinar do que a menos sensacional química do nitrogénio.

A quimiofobia dos tempos modernos exclui o medo dos simples elementos da tabela periódica dos elementos. Circulamos petições, realizamos audiências, lançamos sítios web, compramos e vendemos legisladores graças ao respeito que inspiram os compostos orgânicos polissilábicos – bifenis policlorinatados, polivinis, DDT, 2-4d, essa espécie de coisas — mas não com o simples carbono ou nitrogénio. Não que a utilização agrícola da química mais enfeitada seja benigna — uma criança nascida num condado rural produtor de trigo nos Estados Unidos tem cerca do dobro de probabilidade de sofrer defeitos de nascimento do que uma nascida num lugar rural que não produza trigo, um efeito que os investigadores atribuem aos herbicidas clorofenoxis. Focar a poluição dos pesticidas, contudo, omite o pior dos poluentes. Esqueça os polissilábicos orgânicos. É o nitrogénio – o manancial de fertilidade ao qual está confiado todo o Paraíso, a obsessão dos jardineiros de quintal e de agricultores suburbanos – que nós devemos temer mais.

Aqueles que modelam o nosso planeta como um organismo assim o fazem na base de que a terra parece respirar – ela prospera ao converter uma curta lista de elementos básicos de um composto no seguinte, assim como nossos corpos fazem o ciclo do oxigénio em dióxido de carbono e as plantas do dióxido de carbono em oxigénio. De facto, dois dos mais fundamentais humores do planeta são oxigénio e dióxido de carbono. O outro é o nitrogénio.

O nitrogénio pode ser libertado do seu estado “fixo” como um sólido no solo através de processos naturais que lhe permitem circular livremente na atmosfera. Isto também pode ser feito artificialmente. Na verdade, os humanos agora contribuem com mais nitrogénio para ciclo do nitrogénio do que o faz o próprio planeta. Isto é, os humanos duplicaram a quantidade de nitrogénio em jogo.

Isto levou a um desequilíbrio. É mais fácil criar fertilizante nitrogenado do que aplicá-lo uniformemente pelos campos. Quando agricultores despejam nitrogénio numa plantação, grande parte é desperdiçada. Ele corre para dentro da água e do solo, onde reage quimicamente com a vizinhança para formar novos compostos ou corre para fertilizar outra coisa, em algum outro lugar.

Esta reacção química, chamada acidificação, é nociva e contribui significativamente para a chuva ácida. Um do compostos produzidos pela acidificação é o óxido nitroso (nitrous oxide), o qual agrava o efeito estufa. O crescimento das plantas normalmente contrabalança o aquecimento global ao absorver dióxido de carbono, mas o nitrogénio sobre os campos agrícolas mais o metano da vegetação decomposta torna todo hectare cultivado, assim como todo hectare da auto-estrada de Los Angeles, um contribuinte líquido para o aquecimento global.

A fertilização é igualmente preocupante. A chuva e a água de irrigação inevitavelmente lavam o nitrogénio dos campos para os riachos e correntezas, o qual flui para dentro de rios, os quais fluem para dentro do oceano. Isto explica porque o Rio Mississipi, que drena o Cinturão de Milho (Corn Belt) do país, é uma catástrofe ambiental. O nitrogénio fertiliza artificialmente grandes florescências de algas que ao cresceram sugam todo o oxigénio da água, uma condição que os biólogos chamam de anoxia, que significa “oxigénio esgotado”. Aqui não é preciso calcular efeitos a longo prazo, porque a vida em tais lugares não tem longo prazo: todas as coisas morrem imediatamente. Os eflúvios do Rio Mississipi, pesadamente fertilizados, criaram uma zona morta no Golfo do México do tamanho de Nova Jersey.

A maior cultura da América, o grão de milho, é completamente intragável. É matéria-prima para uma indústria que fabrica substitutos alimentares. Da mesma forma, você não pode comer trigo não processado. Você certamente não pode comer feno. Pode comer feijões de soja não processados, mas a maior parte de nós não o faz. Estas quatro culturas cobrem 82 por cento da terra agrícola americana. A agricultura neste país não é para alimentos; é para mercadorias que exigem o dispêndio de ainda mais energia para tornar-se comida.

Cerca de dois terços do grão de milho americano leva a etiqueta “processado”, significando isto que é moído e além disso refinado para alimentação ou utilizações industriais. Mais de 45 por cento dele torna-se açúcar, especialmente adoçante com alto teor de frutose do milho, o ingrediente chave em três quartos de todos os alimentos processados, especialmente em bebidas doces, o alimento dos pobres e das classes trabalhadoras da América. Não é uma coincidência que a pandemia americana de obesidade siga o aumento de cinco vezes na produção de xarope de milho desde que Archer Daniels Midland desenvolveu uma versão com alta frutose daquilo no princípio da década de setenta. Nem tão pouco é uma coincidência que a praga seleccione os pobres, os quais comem a maior parte da comida processada.

Isto começou com a industrialização na Inglaterra vitoriana. O império estava então cheio do açúcar das plantações nas colónias. Ao mesmo tempo as cidades estavam cheias de trabalhadores fabris. Não havia boa maneira de alimentá-los. E assim nasceu a pausa do chá da tarde, o chá consistindo primariamente de água quente e açúcar. Se os trabalhadores estivessem bem de vida, eles também podiam poupar pão com geleia pesadamente açucarada – a industrialização movida a açúcar. Houve um aumento de 500 por cento na capitação do consumo de açúcar na Grã Bretanha entre 1860 e 1890, um tempo em que a expectativa de vida de um trabalhador fabril masculino era de 17 anos. No fim do séculos o britânico médio estava a obter cerca de um sexto da sua nutrição total do açúcar, exactamente a mesma porcentagem que os americanos obtêm hoje – o dobro do que recomendam os nutricionistas.

Há um outro assunto de energia a considerar aqui, contudo. A trituração, moagem, humidificação, secagem e assadura de um pequeno-almoço de cereal exige cerca de quatro calorias de energia para cada caloria de energia alimentar que produz. Um saco com duas libras (0,9 kg) de cereal queima a energia de meio galão (1,89 litro)de gasolina na sua fabricação. Tudo em conjunto, a indústria de processamento de alimentos nos Estados Unidos utiliza cerca de dez calorias de energia de combustíveis fósseis para cada caloria de energia alimentar que produz.

Este número não inclui o combustível utilizado no transporte do alimento da fábrica para a loja próxima de si, ou o combustível utilizado por milhões de pessoas a conduzirem para milhares de lojas de super descontos no extremo da cidade, onde a terra é barata. Parece, contudo, que o ciclo do milho está prestes a fechar um círculo completo. Se se formasse uma coligação bipartidária de agricultores e legisladores estaduais – e parece que isso acontecerá – dentro em breve compraremos gasolina que contem o dobro do álcool combustível actual. O álcool combustível já se perfila em segundo lugar na utilização de milho processado nos Estados Unidos, atrás apenas dos adoçantes. De acordo com um conjunto de cálculos, gastamos mais calorias de energia de combustíveis fósseis a fabricar etanol do que ganhamos com isto. O Departamento da Agricultura afirma que o rácio está mais próximo de um galão de um quarto de etanol para cada galão de combustível fóssil que investimos. Aquele Departamento chama a isto uma pechincha, porque o gasool (gasohol) é um “combustível limpo”. Esta afirmação de limpeza está em discussão ao nível do tubo de escape e ela certamente ignora a zona morta no Golfo do México, a poluição dos pesticidas e o nevoeiro de gases globais a acumularem-se sobre todo o campo agrícola. Nem esta afirmação limpa a consciência; alguns ainda podem ficar inquietos ao saberem que as exigências dos nossos SUVs [3] por combustíveis competem com as exigências dos pobres por cereais.

Os comedores de verduras, especialmente os vegetarianos, advogam comerem da parte baixa da cadeia alimentar, uma simples questão de fluxo de energia. Comer uma cenoura dá àquele que a ingere toda a energia da cenoura, mas alimentar uma galinha com cenouras e então comer a galinha reduz a energia num factor de dez. A galinha desperdiça alguma energia, armazena alguma como penas, ossos e outras coisas incomestíveis, e utiliza a maior parte dela apenas para viver o tempo suficiente até ser comida. Como uma regra prática, aquele factor de dez aplica-se a cada nível da cadeia alimentar, razão porque alguns peixes, tal como o atum, podem ser um horror nisto tudo. O atum é um predador secundário, significando isto que não só não come plantas como come outros peixes que eles próprios comem outros peixes, acrescentando um zero ao multiplicador a cada passo, facilmente uma centena de vezes, mais provavelmente um milhar de vezes menos eficiente do que comer uma planta.

Isto está muito bem na medida em que funcionar, mas o caso dos vegetarianos pode ser decomposto em alguns pormenores. Em questões de moral, os vegetarianos afirmam que os seus hábitos são mais benévolos para com os animais, embora seja difícil ver como exterminar 99 por cento do habitat da vida selvagem, como a agricultura fez no Iowa, seja benévolo. No Michigan rural, por exemplo, os cultivadores de batatas têm uma táctica peculiar para tratar dos cervos predadores. Eles dão-lhes tiros na barriga com rifles de pequeno calibre, na esperança de que os cervos se arrastem para as florestas e morram num lugar onde não empestem os campos de batatas.

Pondo de lado os direitos do animais, os vegetarianos podem perder no argumento da energia ao comerem alimento processado, com suas dez calorias de energia fóssil por cada caloria de energia alimentar produzida. A questão, então, é: Será que comer alimento processado como burgers de soja ou leite de soja anula os benefícios energéticos do vegetarianismo, o que quer dizer, será que posso comer minhas costeletas de carneiro em paz? Talvez. Se eu tiver tido a devida diligência, terei descoberto que o carneiro particular que estou a comer era tanto local como alimentado com erva, dois factores que naturalmente reduzem em muito a energia embebida numa refeição. Sei de ranchos aqui no Montana, por exemplo, onde o carneiro come ervas nativas sob circunstâncias estritamente controladas – sem agricultura, sem arados, sem milho, sem nitrogénio. Os recursos não foram despojados. Não posso comer a relva directamente. Isto pode prosseguir. Há poucos nichos como este no sistema. É da responsabilidade individual de cada um descobrir tais nichos.

As probabilidades, contudo, são de que qualquer comedor de carne chegará ao fim popular deste argumento, especialmente nos Estados Unidos. Tomemos o caso do bife. O gado pasta, de modo que em teoria poderia viver como o carneiro alimentado a erva. Algumas culturas de gado – aquelas na América do Sul e no México, por exemplo – aperfeiçoaram maravilhosas culinárias baseadas no bife alimentado a erva. Este não é o nosso hábito nos Estados Unidos, e é simplesmente uma questão de hábito. Oitenta por cento do cereal que os Estados Unidos produzem são para a pecuária. Setenta e oito por cento de todo o nosso bife vem de gado estabulado, onde ele come cereal, principalmente milho e trigo. Assim como a maior parte dos nossos porcos e galinhas. O gado passa a sua vida adulta comprimido ombro a ombro num espaço não muito maior do que os seus corpos, sendo alimentado com cereal e um fluxo constante de antibióticos para impedir as doenças que esta espécie de confinamento inevitavelmente engendra. O estrume é rico em nitrogénio e outrora providenciava fertilizante para a agricultura. Os resíduos, contudo, agora são removidos para longe dos campos agrícolas, pois simplesmente não é “eficiente” transportá-los para campos de milho. Isto é desperdício. Exala metano, um gás com efeito estufa. Polui fluxos de água. Desta forma, gastam-se trinta e cinco calorias de combustível fóssil para fabricar uma caloria de bife, sessenta e oito para fabricar uma caloria de porco.

Mais ainda, estes animais fazem algo que nós não podemos. Eles convertem carbohidratos de cereais em proteína de alta qualidade. Tudo bem, excepto que a produção per capita de proteína nos Estados Unidos é cerca do dobro daquela que um adulto médio necessita diariamente. O excesso não pode ser armazenado como proteína no corpo humano e é simplesmente convertido em gordura. Isto é o resultado final de um sistema fábrica-agricultura que surge como um modo de viver, monumento em escala continental a Rube Goldberg [4] , uma repetição em negro do milagre do pão e dos peixes. A produtividade da pradaria é perdida para o cereal, a produtividade do cereal é perdida no gado, a proteína do gado é perdida na gordura humana – tudo subsidiado pelo governo federal com cerca de US$ 15 mil milhões por ano, dois terços dos quais vão directamente para apenas duas culturas: milho e trigo.

Isto explica porque o perito em energia David Pimentel está tão preocupado com a adopção de métodos americanos pelo resto do mundo. Tem de estar, pois o resto do mundo está a adoptá-lo. O México agora destina 45 por cento do seu cereal para o gado, um salto em relação aos 5 por cento de 1960. O Egipto passou de 3 por cento para 31 por cento no mesmo período. E a China, com um sexto da população mundial, subiu de 8 por cento para 26 por cento. Todos estes lugares têm pessoas pobres que poderiam utilizar o cereal, mas elas não têm dinheiro para comprá-lo.

Vivo entre alces e aprendi a respeitá-los. Uma noite de luar no fim do último inverno olhei pela janela do meu quarto e vi cerca de vinte deles a pastarem um campo de erva do tamanho de uma sala. Exactamente aquele pequeno bocado entre hectares de outras espécies de relva da pradaria nativa. Por que aquelas espécies e apenas aquelas espécies de relva naquela noite no pior do inverno quando a ameaça à sua sobrevivência era a maior? Que nutrientes mágicos só esta espécie precisava? O que um animal selvagem sabia que nós não sabíamos? Penso que precisamos deste conhecimento.

Alimentação é política. Sendo este o caso, votei duas vezes em 2002. No dia seguinte ao da eleição, com um humor realmente lúgubre, escalei a montanha por trás da minha casa e descobri uma pequena manada de alces a pastar ervas nativas na manhã ensolarada. O meu respeito por estas criaturas ao longo de anos tornou-se tão grande que naquela manhã que não hesitei e fui directamente à minha tarefa: apanhar um cartucho e despejá-lo sobre uma alce fêmea, minha fonte anual de proteínas para a casa. Votei com a minha arma preferida – um acto não de todo incomum neste mundo, sobretudo, penso, devido ao modo como fomos alimentados na infância. Posso ver porque ele é popular. Tal voto tem uma certa influência satisfatória e sentido de finalidade. O meu bocado particular de violência, contudo, é mais satisfatório, penso, do que a restante confusão política do globo. Utilizei um rifle a fim de optar por não fazer parte de um sistema insano. Matei, mas assim fez você quando comprou aquele pacote de burger, mesmo quando comprou o pacote de burger tofu. Matei, e então os alces restantes prosseguiram, tal como o fizeram as ervas, os pássaros, as árvores, os coiotes, os leões da montanha e os besouros, a produtividade fundamental de um sistema natural intacto, todo ele prosseguiu.

Notas
1- Dust Bowl, Cinturão do Pó, área das Grandes Planícies (Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado e Novo México) mais afectada pela grande seca da década de 1930.
2- Fascista estadunidense que em 1995 fez explodir um edifício governamental no Oklahoma.
3- Sport Utility Vehicle.
4- Cartoonista famoso pelos seus desenhos de máquinas malucas. Ver http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rube_Goldberg .

 

Fuente: Resistir.info

 

 

Leave a Reply