Love’s Celebration Is Worth Life’s Struggles

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By Dady Chery, News Junkie Post | Haiti Chery. “‘Why fight?’ Some ask, when we have probably passed the tipping point in climate change…. One might as well ask: Why live the best lives we can, although we will all die?…. But on accepting the human condition, we also discover that there is pleasure in cherishing what we cannot possess.”

Bees’ Disappearing Act

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By Dady Chery, News Junkie Post | Haiti Chery. Scientists are calling a rapid decline of the bees “colony collapse disorder”, or CCD; however, a more appropriate name would be CCC, for colony collapse catastrophe because this entails the disappearance of a hive’s 30,000 or so individuals within days and without any trace of their bodies.

Biodiversity and Sustainability Closely Linked to Language and Culture

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | News Junkie Post. As linguistic and culturally diversity disappear, so too does biological diversity. This is because the world’s indigenous cultures know best how to create the conditions to maintain species and keep ecosystems functioning in areas where humans also live.

Haiti: Creole Spoken, Creole Understood

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. Creole was certainly the tongue spoken at the 1791 Bwa Cayiman Vodou ceremony that launched the Haitian Revolution. Nevertheless, it was French that served as the text of Haiti’s Independence Declaration and as the country’s only official language until 1987. Why?

Gee-Whiz Science or Biopiracy?

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By Sifelani Tsiki, The Herald | Editorial comment by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. Pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food companies have made millions on plant species that have been used for generations by indigenous groups. Africa could be losing more than US $15 billion from its biodiversity as medicines, cosmetics, agricultural products from indigenous knowledge are illegally patented by multinational companies without benefits accruing to local communities in the countries of origin.

Anti-US Protests Spread Throughout Muslim World

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By Alex Lantier, WSWS. Protests that began one week ago at US embassies in Egypt and Libya are rapidly spreading throughout the Muslim world. The protests reflect broad popular opposition to Washington’s wars, its violation of elementary democratic rights in the conduct of the “war on terror,” and its exploitation of the region as a source of cheap labor. (English | French)

Human Rights Watch in DRC: Watchdog or Master Puppeteer?

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By Albert Rudatsimburwa, The New Times Rwanda. How can the UN mission MONUSCO, with all its military and logistical capacity, be taken to lesser account than Human Rights Watch (HRW), an organisation with questionable access to information? The campaign accusing Rwanda of involvement in the eastern Congo (DRC) is a skillfully executed mass media lobbying by HRW through one of its most valuable players, Anneke Van Woudenberg.

Kagame: ‘Permanent Aid Can Make a Person Become Useless’

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By Gahiji Innocent, News of Rwanda. President Paul Kagame gave a rare interview to the Harvard International Review on the heels of a new investment deal with China and the establishment of sovereign fund that has raised some Rwf 15 billion in two weeks. But even with Chinese cash and investments pouring into Rwanda, Mr Kagame says the ultimate decision about the development of Africa remains with Africans. With regard to Rwanda, Kagame said: “No nation, even the ones who supported the genocide, owes us a favor…. I have said many times to our people, ‘Why should the taxpayers of another nation put food in our mouths and for how long?’”

Poor Children as Big Pharma’s Lab Rats

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By K. S. Harikrishnan, IPS | Staff, Rediff Business. American pharmaceutical companies, taking advantage of a Congressional provision called The Pediatric Exclusivity Provision, have been carrying out clinical trials in poor and developing countries where the drugs might never be available. In India there were over 2,000 deaths in the last four years from serious-adverse events (SAE) during clinical trials, many of which were illegally done without consent. These deaths and a recent discovery of drug testing on Bhopal gas victims have ignited the wrath of rights activists and prompted prominent legal institutions to begin to tighten the country’s drug regulation laws.

Will Namibia’s Newfound Wealth of Groundwater Serve People or Mining?

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By James Anderson, Alertnet. About 0.66 million cubic kilometer (0.16 cubic mile) of groundwater — at least 100 times the amount of renewable freshwater in Africa — lies below the continent’s driest country: Namibia. The battle is on for access to the newfound water by the population versus water utilities and Namibia’s growing mining industry.

Tropical Oceans: Beating Heart of Climate Change

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By University of Plymouth Scientists, Phys.org. The tropical regions of the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans appear to be “acting like a heart”, accumulating heat and then pulsing it in bursts across the Earth.

Hurricanes and Climate Change

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By Brenda Ekwurzel, Union of Concerned Scientists | NOAA | Haiti Chery. Scientific evidence links the destructive power of hurricanes to higher ocean temperatures driven by global warming. Expansion of the oceans due to warming, combined with the inflow of water from melting land ice, have raised global sea levels more than one inch over the last decade. In addition, the water vapor content of the atmosphere over the oceans has increased four percent since 1970.

Current Ebola Outbreaks in Humans Follow Development of ‘Antidote’ in Monkeys

By George Dvorsky, io9 | By Francis Kagolo, Ismael Kasooha, and Anne Mugisa, New Vision. In mid-June, scientists reported that Ebola-infected monkeys could be cured by the administration of a chemical cocktail within 24 hours of the initial exposure. About one month later, there was an Ebola outbreak in Uganda and after this, an outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). These news beg a number of questions on ethics.

Haitian Hot Cocoa

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. In Haiti, a freshly baked roll with a cup of hot cocoa is a typical dinner. We owe Haitian hot cocoa to our successful slave revolution, and we have the Aztecs and Mayans to thank for the elaborate process for manufacturing chocolate from the seeds of Theobroma cacao — “food of the gods.”