Haitian Migrant Workers Heading Home from Dominican Republic for Year End Might Not Return

 

Haitian migrants await permit in Christmas trek for home

By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic – Nearly 2,000 Haitian migrants who work in banana plantations and farms in the northwest prepare to cross the border from December 22 to 27, to spend the holidays in their country.

Haitian migrant workers at the Dajabon crossing (Photo: José Luis Fernández/SF).

The charitable organization Frontier Solidarity (SF) made the announcement Tuesday [December 20], and affirmed that it awaits the Immigration Agency’s authorization to accompany the migrants in their year-end return, as it has been doing for more than six years, through the workers’ association, Asomilin.

In an emailed statement, the SF said Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras has yet to respond to their request of a meeting with that official.

The catholic organization said it has always helped the same group of migrants in the northwest region to cross the border and return to their country during the holidays for years.

The SF added that together with the Mao-Montecristi Diocese, it has organized the documentation process for migrant workers and their relatives during the last eight years, to guarantee transparency in the personal data provided to Immigration and other Dominican Government agencies.

 

Source: Dominican Today

 

 

Haitian migrant workers head home, but return uncertain

By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic – Border Solidarity (SF) and ASOMILIN, two charitable organizations that help Haitian migrants along the Northwest, today accompanied a group of around 280 workers from area agro-industrial companies to cross the border via Customs at Dajabon, for their traditional return to their country during the holidays.

The activity comes despite earlier warnings by the priest and SF executive Regino Martinez, that the crossing was suspended due to lack of guarantees by Dominican authorities that the migrants would be allowed to return after the holiday period.

The entities said even after the workers provided the legal immigration documents required by the authorities, and asked Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras to guarantee their return on January 5, the official still refuses to meet with the leaders of social and catholic organizations that help the Haitians with their year-end travel.

Johnny Rivas, of Asomilin, and Benigno Toribio, of SF, said the documentation process developed since 2009 has managed to get the Dominican authorities to issue 4,519 birth certificates, 480 passports, and 852 visas, a figure they expect will increase in 2012, through the Legislation process 285-04 and its regulation, which president Leonel Fernandez signed into Law after seven years.

Despite the many years they’ve helped Haitian migrants who work in northwest farms cross and return within the same groups, Rivas revealed that this time some of them and their relatives, who are headed home, plan to stay and build their lives in Haitian cities and towns.

Border Solidarity and the Mao-Montecristi Diocese said they’ve been involved in the process of getting IDs for migrant workers and their relatives during eight years, as a way to guarantee transparency in the personal information, which the Dominican Immigration Agency should manage.

 

Source: Dominican Today

 

 

Haitian migrants await permit in Christmas trek for home

By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic.- Nearly 2,000 Haitian migrants who work in banana plantations and farms in the northwest prepare to cross the border from December 22 to 27, to spend the holidays in their country.

The charitable organization Frontier Solidarity (SF) made the announcement Tuesday, and affirmed that it awaits the Immigration Agency’s authorization to accompany the migrants in their yearend return, as it has been doing for more than six years, through the workers’ association, Asomilin.

In an emailed statement, the SF said Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras has yet to respond to their request of a meeting with that official.

The catholic organization said it has always helped the same group of migrants in the northwest region to cross the border and return to their country during the holidays for years.

The SF added that together with the Mao- Montecristi Diocese, it has organized the documentation process for migrant workers and their relatives during the last eight years, to guarantee transparency in the personal data provided to Immigration and other Dominican Government agencies.

 

Source: Dominican Today

 

 

Haitian migrant workers head home, but return uncertain

Source: Dominican Today
By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic – Border Solidarity (SF) and ASOMILIN, two charitable organizations that help Haitian migrants along the Northwest, today accompanied a group of around 280 workers from area agro-industrial companies to cross the border via Customs at Dajabon, for their traditional return to their country during the holidays.

The activity comes despite earlier warnings by the priest and SF executive Regino Martinez, that the crossing was suspended due to lack of guarantees by Dominican authorities that the migrants would be allowed to return after the holiday period.

The entities said even after the workers provided the legal immigration documents required by the authorities, and asked Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras to guarantee their return on January 5, the official still refuses to meet with the leaders of social and catholic organizations that help the Haitians with their year-end travel.

Johnny Rivas, of Asomilin, and Benigno Toribio, of SF, said the documentation process developed since 2009 has managed to get the Dominican authorities to issue 4,519 birth certificates, 480 passports, and 852 visas, a figure they expect will increase in 2012, through the Legislation process 285-04 and its regulation, which president Leonel Fernandez signed into Law after seven years.

Despite the many years they’ve helped Haitian migrants who work in northwest farms cross and return within the same groups, Rivas revealed that this time some of them and their relatives, who are headed home, plan to stay and build their lives in Haitian cities and towns.

Border Solidarity and the Mao-Montecristi Diocese said they’ve been involved in the process of getting IDs for migrant workers and their relatives during eight years, as a way to guarantee transparency in the personal information, which the Dominican Immigration Agency should manage.

 

Source: Dominican Today

Haitian migrants await permit in Christmas trek for home

By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic.- Nearly 2,000 Haitian migrants who work in banana plantations and farms in the northwest prepare to cross the border from December 22 to 27, to spend the holidays in their country.

The charitable organization Frontier Solidarity (SF) made the announcement Tuesday, and affirmed that it awaits the Immigration Agency’s authorization to accompany the migrants in their yearend return, as it has been doing for more than six years, through the workers’ association, Asomilin.

In an emailed statement, the SF said Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras has yet to respond to their request of a meeting with that official.

The catholic organization said it has always helped the same group of migrants in the northwest region to cross the border and return to their country during the holidays for years.

The SF added that together with the Mao- Montecristi Diocese, it has organized the documentation process for migrant workers and their relatives during the last eight years, to guarantee transparency in the personal data provided to Immigration and other Dominican Government agencies.

 

Source: Dominican Today

 

 

Haitian migrant workers head home, but return uncertain

Source: Dominican Today
By Staff
Dominican Today

Dajabon, Dominican Republic – Border Solidarity (SF) and ASOMILIN, two charitable organizations that help Haitian migrants along the Northwest, today accompanied a group of around 280 workers from area agro-industrial companies to cross the border via Customs at Dajabon, for their traditional return to their country during the holidays.

The activity comes despite earlier warnings by the priest and SF executive Regino Martinez, that the crossing was suspended due to lack of guarantees by Dominican authorities that the migrants would be allowed to return after the holiday period.

The entities said even after the workers provided the legal immigration documents required by the authorities, and asked Immigration director Jose Ricardo Taveras to guarantee their return on January 5, the official still refuses to meet with the leaders of social and catholic organizations that help the Haitians with their year-end travel.

Johnny Rivas, of Asomilin, and Benigno Toribio, of SF, said the documentation process developed since 2009 has managed to get the Dominican authorities to issue 4,519 birth certificates, 480 passports, and 852 visas, a figure they expect will increase in 2012, through the Legislation process 285-04 and its regulation, which president Leonel Fernandez signed into Law after seven years.

Despite the many years they’ve helped Haitian migrants who work in northwest farms cross and return within the same groups, Rivas revealed that this time some of them and their relatives, who are headed home, plan to stay and build their lives in Haitian cities and towns.

Border Solidarity and the Mao-Montecristi Diocese said they’ve been involved in the process of getting IDs for migrant workers and their relatives during eight years, as a way to guarantee transparency in the personal information, which the Dominican Immigration Agency should manage.

 

Source: Dominican Today

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