Haiti-Bound Cholera Vaccine ‘Absolutely Useless’ According to Bangladesh Field Trial | Le vaccin pour Haïti contre le choléra est ‘absolument inutile,’ d’après un essai au Bangladesh

Shanchol_picture

False reports on vaccine trials

By Dr. Rashid Haider
The Independent

English | French

As evident from several reports, incidents of scientific fraud involving fabrication and falsification have reached a record high.

One area that should come under careful scrutiny is vaccine trials carried out in far away developing countries where both infectious diseases and corruption are endemic. Many scientists associated with such trials have a long tradition of publishing false and fabricated results in highly prestigious journals of the USA and the UK.

These vaccine trials were carried out in countries which had very poor scientific infrastructure. Local authorities were either too weak to question or they were manipulated.

Internationally accepted ethical guidelines in biomedical research involving human subjects were thrown away. Human beings were treated worse than animals. They were offered bluffs, often intimidated and coerced into vaccine trials.

Relevant scientific data including those related to side effects were not recorded.

Many mandatory tests were not performed.

Yet highly prestigious journals which published and legitimized their so-called findings had never mentioned these misconducts. Often statements were published on matters which were never carried out in the field. In brief, falsification, fabrication and concealment of scientific information became the norms of these scientists.

Some of these fraudulent scientists who are intimately connected to big vaccine companies have made large sum of money cheating the poor who cannot speak for themselves. Incidentally, some of these scientists have managed their way into a number of prestigious world bodies controlling global vaccine policies.

Ironically, they are mostly citizens of western rich countries who are either directly working or maintaining deep contacts in poor countries. The governments of poor countries hosting vaccine trials often depend on aid from rich nations.

Some nations boasting themselves of being very generous aid donors had consciously backed such unethical activities and had profited tremendously by marketing the product.

Poor nations that allow their people to become test animals in exchange of foreign aid do not have the courage to protest in fear of loosing aid money.

Often protests had appeared in the newspapers of the countries hosting these vaccine trials. But those protests just remained there and seldom reached outside including the offices of the prestigious journal editors who relied on peer reviewers lacking knowledge on the realities of the field.

All vaccine trials, no matter where they are carried out, must be supervised by independent and impartial monitors who have no conflict of interest.

Editors of scientific journals have a responsibility to see to it that false and fabricated results are not promoted and the journals maintain high scientific standard based on ethical guidelines published in the Declaration of Helsinki concerning biomedical research involving human subjects.

 

Source:  The Independent

 

 

Field trial of the oral cholera vaccine Shanchol in Bangladesh by ICDDR,B has little justification

By Ahmed Sadiq
News from Bangladesh, Special Report

English | French

The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) launched on February 17, 2011 a large scale field trial of an Indian oral cholera vaccine on the inhabitants of Mirpur, a suburb of Dhaka by exaggerating the fear of cholera.

The vaccine had offered poor protection (only 45 percent) when tested in Kolkata during the first year of follow-up. A recent medical report showed that ICDDR,B had failed to detect the cause of diarrhoea in most of the patients in its treatment centre in Dhaka as only 23 percent of them were diagnosed with cholera. As this vaccine could protect only 10 percent of the recipients against cholera, it is absolutely useless as a diarrhoea control tool.

Scientists associated with Shanchol have offered misleading information on the composition, efficiency and cost of the vaccine. Earlier they had cheated fund donors and used 90,000 poor rural women and children as experimental animals in another oral cholera vaccine trial in Bangladesh in 1985.

The cholera vaccine trial in Mirpur, Dhaka has generated considerable protests in Bangladesh. The Health Rights Movement National Committee of Bangladesh has taken up the issue. According to the organization’s president, Professor Rashid-e-Mahbub , a vested interest was active for marketing cholera vaccines in Bangladesh and ICDDR,B was only pushing the agenda forward. At present, sanitation and not vaccination is the key to cholera control.

Has the Government of Bangladesh examined this vaccine critically before allowing it to be swallowed by large number of Bangladeshis? One wonders!

How long poor Bangladeshis would be used as experimental animals by foreign drug and vaccine companies? One questions.

 

—————————–

SUMMARY

The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) launched on February 17, 2011 a large scale field trial of a killed oral cholera vaccine (trade name Shanchol) on 160,000 people of Mirpur (a suburb of Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka) by exaggerating the fear of cholera. The vaccine, consisting of a large number of two groups of killed cholera bacteria, had offered poor protection of 45 percent to the vaccinees during the first year when field tested in 2006 on the slum dwellers of Kolkata (West Bengal, India).

A recent medical report showed that ICDDR,B had failed to detect the cause of diarrhoea in most of the patients in its treatment centre in Dhaka as only 23 percent of them were diagnosed with cholera. As this vaccine could protect only 10 percent of the recipients against cholera, it is absolutely useless as a diarrhoea control tool. Scientists associated with Shanchol have offered misleading information on the composition, efficiency and cost of the vaccine.

Earlier they had cheated fund donors [The World Health Organization (WHO), governments of USA, Japan, Canada, Bangladesh] and used 90,000 poor rural women and children as experimental animals in another oral cholera vaccine trail in Bangladesh in 1985. Although the trial was conducted to develop a cholera vaccine for the poor people, the results were exploited by profit making European vaccine companies to market Dukoral, a highly expensive oral vaccine against diarrhoea, for rich tourists. Public health experts in Bangladesh have alleged ICDDR,B to raise false alarm on cholera and to act as a vehicle for a profit making multinational vaccine company desiring to capture the global cholera vaccine market. They have identified sanitation, not vaccination, as the key to cholera control.

To obtain credible results, calls for monitoring the trial by impartial observers have been raised. Scientists associated with Shanchol are notorious in manipulating the truth and show little respect to the directives of the scientific integrity postulated by the office of research integrity (ORI) of the US Government. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, financing the trial, should pay attention to the opinion of public health experts in Bangladesh and should see to it that the principles of ORI are obeyed by the scientists associated with the trial of Shanchol.

INTRODUCTION

On February 17, 2011 the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) launched a large-scale field trial of a commercial oral cholera vaccine (trade name Shanchol) involving 240,000 inhabitants of Mirpur, a suburb of Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka (1). According to the trial plan, 160,000 people received the vaccine and 80,000 remained unvaccinated. The trial, named as the Introduction of Cholera Vaccine in Bangladesh (ICVB), was carried out on the assumption that cholera is a major health problem in Bangladesh. If satisfactory trial results had been produced by ICDDR,B, it would have persuaded the Bangladesh Government to incorporate Shanchol into the national immunization programme, thereby feeding it to all the people of Bangladesh. However, a critical scientific analysis did not support this viewpoint propagated by ICDDR,B.

A. The oral vaccine Shanchol is absolutely useless to control cholera

The vaccine Shanchol contains large amount of two groups of killed cholera bacteria (Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139). It is administered orally in two doses separated by a two week interval. Immunity develops one week after the second dose (2). The vaccine requires cold chain as it is to be stored at 2-8 degree Celsius.

The trial of Shanchol in Dhaka was launched on the basis of the earlier trial of the vaccine in Kolkata (India) in 2006. Its results under a period of two years, reported in a British medical journal (The Lancet) in 2009, showed that the vaccine had offered poor protection as only 40 – 45 percent of those who took the vaccine were protected against cholera during the first year of surveillance (Reference 2, The Lancet, year 2009, volume 374, page 1699, Table 3).

A recent study published in April 2011 by ICDDR,B on the diarrhoeal problem in Mirpur area of Dhaka during 2008 – 2010 revealed the following:

(i) ICDDR,B, despite bragging always of its latest state of the art technology and being funded immensely by national and international donors, had failed to diagnose the cause of diarrhoea among two-thirds of the patients who came to its treatment centre in Dhaka.

(ii) Among the patients, 23 percent had cholera, 11 percent had E. coli diarhoea and 2 percent had diarrhoea due to other bacteria (3).

If the people of Mirpur had been vaccinated with Shanchol, only 10 percent of them would have been protected against cholera. Therefore, this cholera vaccine of poor efficacy that can protect only 10 percent of the population against diarrhoea is absolutely useless and not at all required.

Children under 5 years of age are most vulnerable to cholera. Another recent study conducted by ICDDR,B in a southern region of Bangladesh during 2005-2007 showed that only 14 percent children under 5 were infected with cholera bacteria (4).

This study also showed that ICDDR,B had failed to diagnose more than 60 percent of diarrhoeal cases.

Therefore the claim of cholera as a major cause of diarrhoeal illness in Bangladesh, put forward by ICDDR,B, is not supported by scientific evidence.

B. Scientists behind the vaccine trial previously cheated the fund donors and trial participants

A group of American and Swedish scientists based in South Korea and Sweden (John Clemens of the International Vaccine Institute, South Korea and Jan Holmgren, Gothenburg University Sweden) are the prime pushers of the vaccine ( 2) . They have been working on this vaccine for several years in Vietnam (5). As the Vietnamese drug agency is not recognized internationally, they decided to exploit the Indian drug agency, the later being globally accepted. Hence they moved their operations to Kolkata with a view to capture the global vaccine market. The vaccine is produced in India by Shantha Biotechnics, its parent company being Safoni-Aventis of France.

Incidentally the two above-mentioned scientists (John Clemens and Jan Holmgren ) behind the cholera vaccine trial are notorious in manipulating the truth. They have been associated with ICCDR,B for several decades.

In 1985, they tested a highly expensive Swedish oral cholera vaccine on 90,000 poor rural women and children at Matlab, the field station of ICDDR,B. The vaccine trial was regarded as being unethical as it had violated the Declaration of Helsinki concerning ethics in biomedical research involving human subjects on several counts (6).

Strong criticisms were launched in the Bangladeshi press at that time. Details of these events have been described in a book published by UBINIG, the Bangladeshi organization that had followed the trial (6).

John Clemens, Jan Holmgren and a few of their expatriate ICCDR,B colleagues published false results in the Lancet (7). They cheated the financial donors [The World Health Organization (WHO), governments of USA, Canada, Japan and Bangladesh] who had provided millions of dollars supporting the vaccine trial (8 – 10). The vaccine had produced short term protection that did not last even for one year. The vaccine was practically ineffective in children, the targeted population in heavily endemic areas such as Bangladesh (9, 10).

The Swedish scientists (Jan Holmgren and his wife Ann-Mari Svenerholm) used the trial results for marketing an expensive vaccine Dukoral (sold at approximately 75 US Dollars in Europe) for rich tourists visiting cholera endemic countries (11, 12). But the trial was carried out in Bangladesh to produce a cholera vaccine for poor people and not for rich tourists. As documents reveal, Jan Holmgren made millions of dollars in cheating 90,000 poor women and children of Bangladesh using them as experimental animals (13). These unfortunate women and children could not speak for themselves and became easy preys to those with little respect for ethical values. Incidentally, this oral cholera vaccine has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is not available in the U.S.A.

C. Concealing information on the composition of the vaccine and its effectiveness

(i) Bacterial content of the vaccine

Scientists associated with the vaccine (John Clemens, Jan Holmgren and their Kolkata colleagues) have concealed information on the bacterial content of the vaccine Shanchol from their report published in the journal Lancet (2). They have disguised it under a fictitious term ELISA UNIT which they have neither defined nor have given any reference to it. However, this information was traced in the protocol of the Kolkata trial of the vaccine in 2006 (14). It contained very large amount of cholera bacteria (1.75 billion) per dose, 22 times more than the moderately effective injectable cholera vaccines used until the 1970s. Two doses are required for the immunization course.

(ii) Mercury content of the vaccine

The report of the Kolkata trial of Shanchol also concealed the presence of the mercury containing compound thiomersal in the vaccine (2).

Because of its possible toxic side-effects due to the presence of mercury, most of the vaccines produced in Europe and USA do not contain thiomersal.

As Shanchol contains thiomersal at a concentration of 0.02 percent (w/v) [displayed on the vaccine vial] , a single oral dose comprising 1.5 ml of the vaccine would contain 300 microgram (mcg) of thiomersal. In multi-dose vials, WHO mentions of the use of thiomersal in the range of 10 to 50 mcg per dose (15). The thiomersal content of Shanchol is six times higher than the upper limit of thiomersal content of a multi-dose vial quoted by WHO.

In addition, WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization recommends the use of a non-mercury based preservative in the oral cholera vaccine (16). The manufacturer of Shanchol should have followed the recommendation. According to a Bangladesh weekly Budhbar, published last March, Firdausi Qadri, the principal scientist of ICDDR,B in charge of the vaccine trial, provided inaccurate information about the composition of the vaccine (17). She claimed that the vaccine contained 0.015 percent thiomersal and did not cite the WHO recommendation on the proper use of thiomersal.

(iii) Protective efficacy of the vaccine

The vaccine had offered protection of only 45 percent for all age groups during the first year of surveillance.

Its efficacy on children under 5, the group most vulnerable to cholera, was not disclosed in the published report (2).

Interestingly, the vaccine has been claimed to offer 67 percent protection when monitored after two years (2). The elevated level of protection during the second year in comparison to a much lower level of protection in the first year has not been adequately explained. How was it possible that the protection level had increased so much during the second year? Therefore, the reliability of information coming out of the vaccine trial in Kolkata is questionable.

As Shanchol demonstrated poor efficacy soon after its administration, it cannot be regarded as an effective vaccine to control cholera. But scientists propagating this vaccine conceal the disappointing results of the first year and brag about the questionable results of the second year (18). This practice constitutes scientific dishonesty that runs contrary to the guidelines of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) of the US Government that urge scientists to maintain accuracy, integrity and honesty in scientific communications (19).

D. Concealing the cost of the vaccine

Scientists linked with Shanchol have propagated it as a cheap vaccine costing US $1.0 per dose without mentioning the source and methodology that contributed this information (18). According to the reports in the Indian press, the commercially available two doses of Shanchol, required for the immunization course, were priced at Indian rupees 600 (approximately US $12), hardly an affordable price for the cholera suffering poor people of India or elsewhere (20). It is a bluff thrown by the scientists associated with Shanchol.

They have done this also on a previous occasion. The high cost of the vaccine became indeed an issue in protests against the oral cholera vaccine trial of 1985 and was widely mentioned in the Bangladeshi press in the 1980s. In response to those criticisms, Roger Eeckels, then Director of ICDDR,B, issued a bluff stating the cost of the vaccine around $1.50 – $2.00 per dose (21). He further stated that with improved technology of bacterial genetics a simpler process of local vaccine production was to be evolved which would bring the cost down even further. Two decades later another director (David Sack) of ICDDR,B at the Dhaka press conference on April 12, 2007 threw another bluff that one day it would be as affordable as a pack of oral saline (22, 23). Now this ineffective vaccine, sold at a price of US $35 in Bangladesh, is pushed down the throats of Bangladeshis so that profits can flow from Bangladesh to the Dutch manufacturer (Crucell) of Dukoral. In Europe, the vaccine Dukoral is sold at an exorbitant price of US $75.

E. The World Health Organization – an umbrella for the company-linked vaccine scientists

Scientists associated with commercial killed oral cholera vaccines (Dukoral and Shanchol) control the cholera vaccination programme of WHO (24) and push their agenda through WHO by spreading false information to promote the commercial interests of these vaccines (18). As company linked scientists are associated with various vaccination programmes of WHO, the credibility of this global institution has been severely damaged, as revealed by the prestigious British Medical Journal, the report of the Council of Europe on the swine flu pandemic and also by an article on the Internet (25-29). In brief, the credibility of publications of WHO related to cholera vaccination is questionable and should be very carefully scrutinized.

F. US Government guidelines on scientific integrity

The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) of the US Government has strict guidelines concerning honesty in scientific research (19). Dishonest practices such as falsification, fabrication, selective publication and ignoring primary sources of information are not endorsed by ORI. Unfortunately, some scientists prefer to give a blind eye to the guidelines of ORI that are universally applicable. It is about time that scientists receiving funding from the US Government should pay attention to the directives of ORI.

F. The vaccine trial and the protest

The cholera vaccine trial in Mirpur, Dhaka has generated considerable protests in Bangladesh. A number of major publications of Bangladesh have carried out articles criticizing the merits of the trial as ICDDR,B was rightfully alleged to have exaggerated the case of cholera in Bangladesh in order to act as a vehicle for profit making multinational vaccine company (30 – 35).

The Government of Bangladesh was not unanimous on the incidence of cholera in Bangladesh as its Director General of Public Health has expressed reservation on this issue (32, 35). Because of dishonesty practiced earlier in the oral cholera vaccine trial of 1985, calls for monitoring the trial by impartial observed have also appeared in the press.

The Health Rights Movement National Committee of Bangladesh organized a press conference on cholera vaccination on 14 May, 2011 where the committee correctly stated that sanitation, not vaccination, is the key to cholera control. According to the president of the organization, Professor Rashid-e-Mahbub , a vested interest was active for marketing cholera vaccines in Bangladesh and ICDDR,B was only pushing the agenda forward (32). He stressed that Bangladesh did not need cholera vaccines, as ensuring safe water alone could keep the bacterium at bay. Public health expert Dr. Khairul Islam had expressed similar opinion (32).

According to Dr. Islam, designation of cholera as the major cause of children’s death fits the agenda of any research organization or vaccine producing company. Diarrhoea or cholera is no more the major cause of the death of children in Bangladesh (32). Considerable progress has been made in recent years as in 2010 Bangladesh received the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) award for reducing child mortality (36). But Ferdausi Qadri, spokesperson of ICDDR,B on the cholera vaccine trial, is oblivious to these developments as she saw vaccination as the only route to salvation (32).

Protests against oral cholera vaccine trials are nothing new, especially when one of the key persons is John Clemens of the International Vaccine Institute of South Korea. As a matter of fact, wherever John Clemens had been involved in cholera vaccine trials, in Bangladesh or Mozambique, mass protests had taken place (6, 37).

Similar to Bangladesh, people of Mozambique also protested as they felt being treated as experimental animals.

Concluding remarks:

ICDDR,B has exaggerated the case of cholera in Bangladesh in order to promote an ineffective vaccine of poor protective efficacy produced by a French company that eventually wants to capture the global cholera vaccine market.

Twenty six years ago, ICDDR,B also conducted the field trial of another oral cholera vaccine that benefited European vaccine companies to market a highly expensive cholera vaccine for rich tourists from developed countries. Both the fund donors of that trial as well as the poor vaccine recipients of Bangladesh were deceived.

Cholera is neither a major health problem in Bangladesh nor Shanchol, the ineffective spaced two-dose vaccine is the answer. People can get cholera in the interval period between the two doses.

Cholera is an easily treatable disease that can be effectively cured by different rehydration therapy (oral or intravenous fluids) and if necessary, by antibiotics. At present sanitation and not vaccination is the key to cholera control. Members of the Health Rights Movement National Committee of Bangladesh have stated this very loud and clear at the press conference in Dhaka on May 14, 2011.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funding this trial should pay attention to the opinion of such experts.

As the same group of scientists are behind the ongoing cholera vaccine trial as they were behind the highly controversial trial of 1985, it is absolutely necessary that the trial results should be monitored by impartial observers with no conflicts of interest. Otherwise credible results of the trial will not emerge.

Scientists associated with Shanchol have concealed information on the composition and cost of the vaccine. They have also propagated selective information on its efficacy. These practices run contrary to the universally accepted guidelines of scientific integrity outlined by ORI of the US Government. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, financing the trial, must see to it that the principles of ORI are strictly followed by the scientists associated with the trial.

—————————–
References

  • 1. Agence France-Presse. Bangladesh to hold massive cholera vaccine trial. February 16, 2011.
  • 2. Lancet. 2009; 374(9702):1694-702.
  • 3. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2011 April; 5(4): e999.
  • 4. J Health Popul Nutr. 2011 Feb;29(1):1-8.
  • 5. Vaccine. 2006; 24:4297-303.
  • 6. Mazhar F. 1996. Women and children of Bangladesh as experimental animals. Dhaka (ISBN No. 984-467-050-0).
  • 7. Lancet. 1986; 2(8499):124-7.
  • 8. Lancet. 1986; 2(8499):124-7.
  • 9.  J Infect Dis. 1988; 158:60-9.
  • 10. Lancet. 1988; 1(8599): 1375-79.
  • 11. DUKORAL: Resevacciner fran SBL Vaccin (Travel vaccines from SBL Vaccin), 105 21 Stockholm, Sweden. 1996.
  • 12. Sadiq A. Marketing of the Oral Cholera Vaccine Dukoral using Misleading Information and the Exploitation of Women and Children of Bangladesh as Experimental Animals. News from Bangladesh. January 24, 2011.
  • (http://bangladesh-web.com/view.php?hidRecord=346593)
  • 13. The Internet press release, Active Biotech/SBL Vaccin AB, June 29, 1998.
  • 14. A Radomized Controlled Trial of the Bivalent Killed Whole Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine in Eastern Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Protocol/Version Number C-8-Pill version 3.0 Section 6.1 Study agents (Vaccine and placebo)
  • 15. WHO. 2006. Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine safety , Thiomersal and vaccines: questions and answers. http://www.who.int/vaccine_safety/topics/thiomersal/questions/en/
  • 16. WHO Expert Committee on Biological standardization, Technical Report Series No 2004; 924: 1-232.
  • 17. http://budhbar.com/?p=4490
  • 18. Cholera vaccines, Weekly Epidemiological Report, No 13, 2010, 85, 117-128.
  • 19. Office of Research Integrity. US Department of Health and Human Services. Avoiding plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices: A guide to ethical writing. http://ori.hhs.gov/education/products/plagiarism/1.shtml
  • 20. Business Daily, The Hindu Group of Publications, April 27, 2009.
  • 21. Eeckels R. Brief account of the major allegations in the press against ICDDR,B. The Dhaka Courier, August 29, 1986.
  • 22. The Daily Star (Dhaka): Local scientists develop diarrhoea vaccine, April 13, 2007
  • 23. The New Nation (Dhaka): Breakthrough in medical science: Diarrhoea vaccine Dukoral launched-Bangladeshi scientists have developed a vaccine that has been proven to be effective in preventing diarrhoea; April 13, 2007.
  • 24. http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/SAGE_cholera_overview_slides_10-28-09_Jon_Abramson.pdf
  • 25. Godlee F. 2010. Conflicts of interest and pandemic flu. 2010 Jun 3;340:c2947.
  • 26. Cohen D, Carter P. WHO and the pandemic flu ‘conspiracies’ BMJ 2010;340:c2912.
  • 27. Jefferson T, Doshi P. WHO and pandemic flu. Time for change, BMJ. 340: c3461.
  • 28. PACE Health Committee denounces ‘unjustified scare’ of Swine Flu, waste of public money. Press release # 455 (2010) http://www.coe.int/document-library/default.asp?urlwcd=https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=1631637
  • 29. Haider, R. Racketeering in the World Health Organization’s Cholera Vaccination Programme: Evil forces channel public funds into private pockets. News From Bangladesh, August 6, 2009 (http://www.bangladesh-web.com/view.php?hidDate=2009-08- 10&hidType=OPT)
  • 30. Prothom Alo, Dhaka. February 18, 2011
  • 31. Ahmed Sadiq. The cholera vaccine trial of ICDDR,B should be monitored by impartial observers. News from Bangladesh. March 10, 2011
  • 32. Nurul Islam Hasib. BDnews24. Govt Raises False Alarm http://dhaka.bdnews24.com/details.php?id=194498&cid=13
  • 33. Health Rights Movement Bangladesh, Press Conference on cholera vaccination
  • 14 May, 2011 http://bdnews24.com/pdetails.php?id=201263
  • 34. Minister under attack over cholera comments. New Age. May 15, 2011
  • http://newagebd.com/newspaper1/frontpage/18746.html?print
  • 35. Transparency in vaccine trial advised. BDNews24. July 19, 2011 http://bdnews24.com/pdetails.php?id=201263
  • 36. The Millennium Development Goals: Where Bangladesh Stands? 2010. Source (www.dghs.gov.bd)
  • 37. Agencia de Informacao de Mocambique (Maputo) News, March 4, 2004.

—————————-

Source: News from Bangladesh

 

 

Related articles:
The Uses of Haiti’s Poor Children: Guinea Pigs for Cholera Vaccines
Cholera Vaccines Unnecessary, Ineffective, Expensive, and Dangerous
Why It Took Eleven Months Instead of Three Weeks to Show that Haiti’s Cholera Is Nepalese
Without Consent: How Drugs Companies Exploit Indian ‘Guinea Pigs’
WHO Pandemic Flu Advisers Paid by Roche, Glaxo, Investigations Find

 

Les rapports faux sur les essais de vaccins

Par le Dr Rashid Haider
The Independent | Haiti Chery

anglais | français

Traduit en français par Dady Chery pour Haiti Chery

Comme disent plusieurs rapports, les incidents de fraude scientifique impliquant la fabrication et la falsification ont atteint un niveau assez élevé.

Une domaine qui devrait rentrer en surveillance attentive est celle des essais de vaccins effectués dans des pays lointains en développement, où les maladies infectieuses et la corruption sont endémiques. Beaucoup de scientifiques associés à de tels essais ont une longue tradition de publication des résultats faux et fabriqués dans des revues prestigieuses des Etats-Unis et du Royaume-Uni.

Ces essais de vaccins ont été réalisées dans des pays très pauvres qui n’avaient pas d’infrastructure scientifique. Les autorités locales étaient manipulés ou trop faibles pour questionner ces essais.

Les directives éthiques internationalement acceptées pour la recherche biomédicale avec des sujets humains ont été ignoré. Les êtres humains ont été traité pire que des animaux. Ils furent bluffés, souvent intimidés et contraints à ces essais de vaccins.

Les données scientifiques pertinentes, y compris celles liées aux effets secondaires n’ont pas été enregistré.

Beaucoup de tests obligatoires n’ont pas été effectué.

Pourtant, des revues très prestigieuses qui ont publié et légitimé les soi-disant découvertes n’ont jamais mentionné ces inconduites. Souvent, les déclarations ont paru sur des questions qui n’ont jamais été abordé dans le domaine. En bref, la falsification, la fabrication et la dissimulation d’informations scientifiques sont devenues la norme de ces scientifiques.

Certains de ces scientifiques frauduleux qui sont intimement liés à des fabricants de vaccins ont gagné de grosse sommes d’argent pour tricher les pauvres qui ne peuvent parler pour eux-mêmes. Incidemment, certains de ces scientifiques ont réussi a participer dans un certain nombre d’organismes internationaux prestigieux de contrôle des politiques mondiales des vaccins.

Ironiquement, ils sont surtout des citoyens des pays riches occidentaux qui travaillent directement ou au maintiennent de contacts étroits dans les pays pauvres. Les gouvernements des pays pauvres qui hébergent ces essais de vaccins dépendent souvent de l’aide de ces nations riches.

Certaines nations qui se vantent d’être des donateurs très généreux ont consciemment soutenu ces activités immorales et profité énormément de la commercialisation des produits.

Les pays pauvres qui permettent que leurs citoyens deviennent des animaux-sujets en échange pour l’aide étrangère n’ont pas le courage de protester parce qu’ils craignent de perdre l’argent de l’aide.

Souvent des protestations sont parues dans les journaux des pays accueillant ces essais de vaccins. Mais ces protestations restent simplement là-bas et atteignent rarement en dehors, y compris les bureaux des éditeurs des revues prestigieuses qui comptent sur des examinateurs manquant de connaissances sur les réalités sur le terrain.

Tous les essais de vaccins, peu importe où ils sont effectués, doivent être supervisés par des observateurs indépendants et impartiaux, qui n’ont pas de conflit d’intérêts.

Les éditeurs de revues scientifiques ont une responsabilité de veiller à ce que les résultats fausses et fabriquées ne soient pas promues et que les revues maintiennent un haut niveau scientifique basé sur les principes éthiques publiés dans la Déclaration d’Helsinki concernant la recherche biomédicale sur des sujets humains.

 

Origines:  The Independent | Haiti Chery

© Copyright 2012. Ce matériel est disponible pour la réédition tant que les réimpressions auraient une copie verbatim de l’article complet, en respectant son intégrité. Réimpressions de cette traduction en francais doivent citer Rashid Haider, Dady Chery et Haïti Chery, et avoir également un «lien directe» à l’article.

 

 

L’essai du vaccin oral Shanchol contre le choléra au Bangladesh par ICDDR, B trouve peu de justification

Par Ahmed Sadiq
News From Bangladesh | Haiti Chery

anglais | français

Traduit en français par Dady Chery pour Haiti Chery

Le Centre International de Recherche Contre les Maladies Diarrhéiques, au Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) a lancé le 17 Février, 2011 un essai à grande échelle d’un vaccin oral indien contre le choléra sur les habitants de Mirpur, une banlieue de Dhaka, en exagérant la peur du choléra.

Le vaccin a offert une protection faible (seulement 45 pour cent) lorsqu’il était testé à Kolkata pendant la première année de suivi. Un rapport médical plus récent a montré que ICDDR,B n’avait pas réussi à détecter la cause de la diarrhée dans la plupart des patients dans son centre de traitement à Dhaka, et que seulement 23 pour cent étaient diagnostiqués avec le choléra. Comme ce vaccin protégeait seulement 10 pour cent des bénéficiaires contre le choléra, il est absolument inutile comme un outil de contrôle des diarrhées.

Des scientifiques associés au Shanchol ont fourni des informations trompeuses sur la composition, l’efficacité et le coût de ce vaccin. Auparavant, ils avaient triché les bailleurs de fonds et utilisé 90 000 femmes rurales pauvres et des enfants comme des animaux-sujets de laboratoire pour un autre vaccin anticholérique oral au Bangladesh en 1985.

L’essai du vaccin du choléra dans Mirpur, Dhaka a généré des protestations considérables au Bangladesh. Le Comité National du Bangladesh du Mouvement sur les Droits de la Santé a pris cette question. Selon le président de l’organisation, le professeur Rashid-e-Mahbub, il y a un intérêt actif pour la commercialisation des vaccins anticholériques au Bangladesh, et l’ICDDR,B ne faisait seulement que pousser en avance. L’organisation sur les Droits de la Santé a conclu que l’assainissement est clé pour la lutte contre le choléra.

Le gouvernement du Bangladesh a-til critiquement examiné ce vaccin avant de le permettre d’être avalé par un grand nombre de Bangladais? On se demande!

Pendant combien de temps les pauvres du Bangladesh seront ils utilisés comme animaux-sujets de laboratoire par des entreprises pharmaceutiques étrangères de vaccin? C’es une des questions.

———-

SOMMAIRE

Le Centre International de Recherche contre les maladies diarrhéiques au Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) a lancé le 17 Février, 2011 un essai à grande échelle d’un vaccin orale contre le choléra tué (nom commercial Shanchol) sur 160 000 habitants de Mirpur (une banlieue du Bangladesh, la capitale Dhaka) en exagérant la peur du choléra. Le vaccin, composé d’un grand nombre de deux groupes de bactéries de choléra tués, avait offert une mauvaise protection de 45 pour cent aux vaccinés durant la première année et aux habitants des bidonvilles de Calcutta testés sur le terrain en 2006 (Bengale occidental, Inde).

Un rapport médical récent a montré que ICDDR,B n’avait pas réussi à détecter la cause de la diarrhée dans la plupart des patients dans son centre de traitement à Dhaka, et que seulement 23 pour cent d’entre eux avaient été diagnostiqué avec le choléra. Comme ce vaccin pourrait protéger seulement 10 pour cent des bénéficiaires contre le choléra, il est absolument inutile comme un outil de contrôle des diarrhées. Des scientifiques associés à Shanchol ont fourni des informations trompeuses sur la composition, l’efficacité et le coût du vaccin.

Auparavant, ils avaient triché des bailleurs de fonds [L’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS), les gouvernements des Etats-Unis, Japon, Canada, Bangladesh] et utilisé 90 000 femmes rurales pauvres et des enfants comme des animaux-sujets de laboratoire dans un autre essai de vaccin anticholérique oral au Bangladesh en 1985. Bien que l’essai a été réalisé pour développer un vaccin contre le choléra pour les pauvres, les résultats ont été exploités par des sociétés à but lucratif, le vaccin Dukoral sur le marché européen est un vaccin très coûteux contre la diarrhée pour les touristes riches. Les experts en santé publique au Bangladesh ont dit que ICDDR,B a fait de fausses alarmes sur le choléra et a agit comme un véhicule pour des entreprises multinationales de vaccin à but lucratif and désirant de conquérir le marché mondial des vaccins du choléra. Les experts en santé publique ont identifié l’assainissement, et non pas la vaccination, comme la clé de la lutte contre le choléra.

Pour obtenir des résultats crédibles, les appels pour le suivi de l’essai par des observateurs impartiaux ont été soulevé. Des scientifiques associés au Shanchol sont notoires pour la manipulation de la vérité et montrent peu de respect aux directives de l’intégrité scientifique postulé par l’Office of Research Integrity (ORI) du gouvernement américain. L’organisation Bill et Melinda Gates, qui finance ce procès, doit prêter attention à l’opinion des experts en santé publique au Bangladesh et doit veiller à ce que les principes d’ORI soivent respectés par les scientifiques associés aux essais de Shanchol.

INTRODUCTION

Le 17 Février 2011, le Centre international pour la recherche sur les maladies diarrhéiques au Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) a lancé un essai à grande échelle d’un vaccin par voie orale commerciale contre le choléra (nom commercial Shanchol) avec 240 000 habitants de Mirpur, une banlieue du Bangladesh, la capitale Dhaka ( 1). Selon le plan d’essai, 160 000 personnes ont reçu le vaccin et 80 000 sont restées non vaccinées. Le procès, nommé l’introduction du vaccin de choléra au Bangladesh (ICVB), a été réalisé sur l’hypothèse que le choléra est un problème majeur de santé au Bangladesh. Si les résultats d’essais satisfaisants avaint été produits par ICDDR, B, il aurait persuadé le gouvernement du Bangladesh d’intégrer Shanchol dans le programme national de vaccination, ce qui le donnerait à tout le peuple du Bangladesh. Toutefois, une analyse critique scientifique n’a pas confirmé le point de vue propagé par ICDDR,B.

A. Le vaccin oral Shanchol est absolument inutile contre le choléra

Le vaccin Shanchol porte une grande quantité de deux groupes de bactéries de choléra tuées (Vibrio cholerae O1 et O139). Il est administré par voie orale en deux doses séparées par un intervalle de deux semaines. L’immunité se développe une semaine après la deuxième dose (2). Le vaccin nécessite la chaîne du froid car il doit être stocké à 2-8 degrés Celsius.

L’essai de Shanchol à Dhaka a été basé sur un essai précédent de ce vaccin à Kolkata (Inde) en 2006. Les résultats pendant une période de deux ans qui étaient rapportés dans un journal médical britannique (The Lancet) en 2009, ont montré que le vaccin avait offert une mauvaise protection parce que seulement 40 à 45 pour cent de ceux qui ont pris le vaccin ont été protégé contre le choléra pendant la première année de surveillance (référence 2, Les 374 volumes Lancet, année 2009, page 1699, tableau 3).

Une étude récente publiée en avril 2011 par ICDDR,B sur les problèmes diarrhéiques dans la zone de Dhaka Mirpur au cours de 2008 à 2010 a révélé les éléments suivants:

(i) ICDDR,B, malgré s’avoir toujours vanté d’avoir la nouvelle technologie et d’être financé par des donateurs immensément nationaux et internationaux, n’avait pas réussi à diagnostiquer la cause de la diarrhée pour les deux-tiers des patients qui étaient venus à son centre de traitement dans Dhaka.

(ii) Parmi les patients, 23 pour cent avaient le choléra, 11 pour cent avaient une diarhoea de Escherichia coli et 2 pour cent avaient la diarrhée due à d’autres bactéries (3).

Si le peuple de Mirpur a été vacciné avec Shanchol, seulement 10 pour cent d’entre eux auraient été protégé contre le choléra. Par conséquent, ce vaccin contre le choléra d’une faible efficacité, qui ne protége que 10 pour cent de la population contre la diarrhée, est absolument inutile et pas du tout nécessaire.

Les enfants de moins de 5 ans sont les plus vulnérables au choléra. Une autre étude récente menée par ICDDR,B dans une région du sud du Bangladesh durant la période 2005-2007 a montré que seulement 14 pour cent des enfants de moins de 5 étaient infectés par la bactérie du choléra (4).

Cette étude a également montré que ICDDR,B avait omi de diagnostiquer plus de 60 pour cent des cas de diarrhée.

Par conséquent, la revendication de choléra comme une cause majeure de maladies diarrhéiques au Bangladesh, avancée par ICDDR,B, n’est pas étayée par des preuves scientifiques.

B. Les scientifiques derrière l’essai de vaccin avaient auparavant trompé les bailleurs de fonds et les participants du procès

Un groupe de scientifiques américains et suédois basés en Corée du Sud et la Suède (John Clemens de l’International Vaccine Institute, Corée du Sud et Jan Holmgren, Université de Göteborg en Suède) sont les promoteurs premiers du vaccin (2). Ils travaillent sur ce vaccin depuis plusieurs années au Vietnam (5). Comme l’agence vietnamienne du médicament n’est pas reconnue internationalement, ils ont décidé d’exploiter l’agence indienne du médicament, la dernière étant globalement acceptée. Ainsi ils ont déménagé leurs opérations à Kolkata, en vue de conquérir le marché mondial des vaccins. Le vaccin Shanchol est produit en Inde par Shantha Biotechnics, sa société mère étant Safoni-Aventis (aussi Safoni Pasteur) de la France.

Incidemment les deux mentionnés scientifiques ci-dessus (John Clemens et Jan Holmgren) derrière l’essai du vaccin du choléra sont connus pour la manipulation de la vérité. Ils ont été associé à ICCDR,B pour plusieurs décennies.

En 1985, ils ont testé un vaccin anticholérique oral suédois très coûteux sur 90 000 femmes rurales pauvres et des enfants à Matlab, la station de l’ICDDR,B. L’essai du vaccin a été considéré comme étant contraire à l’éthique car il avait violé la Déclaration d’Helsinki concernant l’éthique dans la recherche biomédicale sur des sujets humains à plusieurs égards (6).

Des vives critiques ont été lancées dans la presse bangladaise à ce temps. Les détails de ces événements ont été décrits dans un livre publié par UBINIG, l’organisation du Bangladesh qui avait suivi le procès (6).

John Clemens, Jan Holmgren et quelques uns de leurs ICCDR,B collègues expatriés ont publié des résultats erronés dans le Lancet (7). Ils ont trompé le bailleurs de fonds [L’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), les gouvernements des Etats-Unis, Canada, Japon et du Bangladesh], qui avait fourni des millions de dollars soutenant l’essai de vaccins (8 – 10). Le vaccin a produit une protection à court terme qui n’a même pas duré un an. Le vaccin a été pratiquement sans effet pour les enfants, la population ciblée dans les zones fortement endémiques tels que le Bangladesh (9, 10).

Les scientifiques suédois (Jan Holmgren et son épouse Ann-Mari Svenerholm) ont utilisé les résultats de cet essai pour la commercialisation du vaccin cher Dukoral (vendu à environ 75 dollars américains en Europe) pour les touristes riches visitant les pays où le choléra est endémique (11, 12). Mais l’essai a été réalisé au Bangladesh pour produire un vaccin contre le choléra pour les pauvres et non pas pour les touristes riches. Comme des documents révèlent, Jan Holmgren a gagné des millions de dollars dans la tricherie de 90 000 femmes et enfants pauvres du Bangladesh en les utilisant comme des animaux-sujets de laboratoire (13). Ces femmes et enfants malheureux ne pouvaient pas parler pour eux-mêmes et sont devenus des proies faciles pour ceux qui ont peu de respect pour des valeurs éthiques. Incidemment, ce vaccin anticholérique oral n’a pas été approuvé par la Food and Drug Administration américaine (FDA) et n’est pas disponible aux Etats-Unis.

C. Dissimuler des informations sur la composition du vaccin et son efficacité

(i) Nombre de bactéries dans le vaccin

Des scientifiques associés au vaccin (John Clemens, Jan Holmgren et leurs collègues Kolkata) n’ont pas dissimulé des informations sur la teneur en bactéries du vaccin Shanchol dans leur rapport publié dans la revue Lancet (2). Ils l’ont déguisée sous une unité ELISA, en termes fictifs non définis et non référencés. Toutefois, cette information a été tracée dans le protocole de l’essai du vaccin Kolkata en 2006 (14). Il contenait une très grande quantité de bactéries du choléra (175 milliards) par dose, 22 fois plus que les vaccins injectables, modérément efficace contre le choléra, utilisés jusqu’en 1970. Deux doses sont nécessaires pour l’immunisation.

(ii) La teneur en mercure dans le vaccin

Le rapport de l’essai de Shanchol au Kolkata a aussi dissimulé la présence du mercure et une composé du vaccin contenant le thiomersal (2).

En raison des possibles effets secondaires toxiques dues à la présence du mercure, la plupart des vaccins produits en Europe et aux Etats-Unis ne contiennent pas le thiomersal.

Comme le Shanchol contient le thiomersal à une concentration de 0,02 pour cent (p / v) [affiché sur le flacon de vaccin], une seule dose orale comprenant 1,5 millitre du vaccin contiendrait 300 microgrammes (mcg) de thiomersal. En flacons multi-doses, l’OMS mentionne l’utilisation du thiomersal dans la gamme de 10 à 50 mcg par flacon (15). Le contenu du thiomersal Shanchol est alors six fois plus élevé que la limite supérieure de contenu du thiomersal d’un flacon multi-doses cité par l’OMS.

En outre, le Comité OMS d’experts de la standardisation biologique recommande de ne pas utiliser un préservatif à base de mercure dans le vaccin oral anticholérique (16). Le fabricant du Shanchol aurait dû suivre cette recommandation. Selon un article de l’hebdomadaire Budhbar de Bangladesh en mars dernier, Firdausi Qadri, le scientifique principal de l’ICDDR,B en charge de l’essai du vaccin, a fourni des informations inexactes au sujet de la composition du vaccin (17). Elle a affirmé que le vaccin contenait 0,015 pour cent du thiomersal mais n’a pas correctement cité la recommandation de l’OMS sur l’utilisation du thiomersal.

(iii) L’efficacité protectrice du vaccin

Le vaccin avait offert une protection de seulement 45 pour cent pour tous les groupes d’âge durant la première année de surveillance.

Son efficacité sur les enfants de moins de 5 ans, le groupe le plus vulnérable au choléra, n’a pas été divulgué dans le rapport publié (2).

Fait intéressant, le vaccin a été revendiqué à offrir une protection de 67 pour cent quand surveillé après deux ans (2). Le niveau élevé de protection durant la deuxième année par rapport à un niveau beaucoup plus bas de protection dans la première année n’a pas été suffisamment expliqué. Comment était-il possible que le niveau de protection avait tellement augmenté pendant la deuxième année? Par conséquent, la fiabilité des informations qui sortent sur l’essai du vaccin à Kolkata est discutable.

Comme Shanchol a démontré une efficacité médiocre peu après son administration, il ne peut pas être considéré comme un vaccin efficace pour lutter contre le choléra. Mais les scientifiques qui propageant ce vaccin dissimulent des résultats décevants sur la première année et vantent des résultats discutables sur la deuxième année (18). Cette pratique constitue la malhonnêteté scientifique qui va contre les directives de l’Office of Research Integrity (ORI) du gouvernement américain qui demande que les scientifiques maintiennent l’exactitude, l’intégrité et l’honnêteté dans les communications scientifiques (19).

D. Dissimuler le coût du vaccin

Les scientifiques liés au Shanchol l’ont propagé comme un vaccin à bon marché qui ne coûte que  $ 1,0 par dose aux États-Unis, sans mentionner la source et la méthodologie qui ont contribué à cette information (18). Selon les rapports dans la presse indienne, les deux doses de Shanchol, requises pour le cours de vaccination et disponibles pour le commerce, ont couté 600 roupies indiennes (environ 12 $ américains), un prix à peine abordable pour des pauvres de l’Inde ou d’ailleurs qui souffrent du choléra ( 20). C’est un bluff lancé par les scientifiques associés au Shanchol.

Ils l’ont fait également à une occasion précédente. Le coût élevé du vaccin est devenu en effet un problème dans les protestations contre le procès vaccin anticholérique oral de 1985 et a été largement évoqué dans la presse bangladaise durant les années 1980. En réponse à ces critiques, Eeckels Roger, alors directeur du ICDDR,B, a émis un bluff en indiquant que le coût du vaccin était autour de 1,50 $ à 2,00 $ par dose (21). Il a en outre indiqué que, grâce à la technologie améliorée de la génétique bactérienne, un procédé plus simple de la production locale du vaccin a évolué, ce qui réduirait le coût encore plus bas.

Deux décennies plus tard, un autre directeur (David Sack) de ICDDR,B, lors d’une conférence de presse à Dhaka le 12 avril 2007, a jeté le bluff qu’un jour ce vaccin serait aussi abordable qu’un paquet de solution saline par voie orale (22, 23). Maintenant, ce vaccin inefficace, vendu pour 35 $ américains au Bangladesh, est forcé dans la gorge des Bangladais pour que des bénéfices peuvent découler du Bangladesh pour le fabricant néerlandais (Crucell) du Dukoral. En Europe, le vaccin Dukoral est vendu pour le prix exorbitant de 75 $ américains.

E. L’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé – un parapluie pour les scientifiques liés aux sociétés de vaccins

Les scientifiques associés aux sociétés commerciales de vaccins anticholériques oraux (Dukoral et Shanchol) de cholera tués contrôlent le programme de vaccination controle le choléra à l’OMS (24) et poussent leur agenda via l’OMS en répandant de informations fausses visant à promouvoir les intérêts commerciaux de ces vaccins (18). La liaison des scientifiques dans divers programmes de vaccination de l’OMS aux sociétés commerciales a sévèrement endommagé la crédibilité de cette institution mondiale, tel que révélé par le prestigieux British Medical Journal à propos du rapport du Conseil de l’Europe sur la pandémie de grippe porcine et aussi par un article sur l’Internet (25-29). En bref, la crédibilité des publications de l’OMS liées à la vaccination contre le choléra est discutable et doit être soigneusement pesée.

F. directives du gouvernement américain sur l’intégrité scientifique

L’Office of Research Integrity (ORI) du gouvernement américain a établi des directives strictes concernant l’honnêteté dans la recherche scientifique (19). Les pratiques malhonnêtes telles que la falsification, la fabrication, et la publication sélective et en ignorant les sources primaires d’information ne sont pas approuvées par l’ORI. Malheureusement, certains scientifiques préfèrent de ne pas voir les directives de l’ORI qui sont universellement applicables. Il est temps que les scientifiques qui reçoivent des fonds du gouvernement américain prêtent attention aux directives de l’ORI.

F. L’essai de vaccin et la protestation

L’essai du vaccin du choléra dans Mirpur, Dhaka a généré des protestations considérables au Bangladesh. Un certain nombre de publications majeures du Bangladesh ont effectué des articles critiquant la fondation de l’essai. L’ICDDR,B a été, à juste titre, accusé d’avoir exagéré les cas de choléra au Bangladesh afin d’agir comme un véhicule pour les sociétés de vaccins multinationales (30 – 35).

Le Gouvernement du Bangladesh n’a pas été unanime sur l’incidence du choléra au Bangladesh. Son directeur général de la Santé Publique a exprimé des réserves sur cette question (32, 35). En raison de la malhonnêteté pratiqué plus tôt dans le vaccin anticholérique oral de 1985, les appelles à une surveillance impartiale des procès ont également paru dans la presse.

Le Comité national du Bangladesh du Mouvement des droits en santé a organisé une conférence de presse sur la vaccination de choléra le 14 mai, 2011 où le comité a correctement déclaré que l’assainissement, et non la vaccination, est la clé de la lutte contre le choléra. Selon le président de l’organisation, le professeur Rashid-e-Mahbub, il y a eu un intérêt pour la commercialisation des vaccins du choléra au Bangladesh et l’ICDDR,B ne faisait seulement que pousser de l’avant (32). Professeur Mahbub a souligné que le Bangladesh n’avait pas besoin de vaccins contre le choléra, qu’une assurance de l’eau potable suffirait pour garder la bactérie à la baie. L’expert en Santé publique M. Khairul Islam avait exprimé une opinion similaire (32).

Selon M. Islam, la désignation du choléra comme la cause majeure de décès des enfants convient à toutes organisations de recherche ou entreprises produisant des vaccins. La diarrhée ou le choléra n’est plus la cause principale de la mort d’enfants au Bangladesh (32). Des progrès considérables ont été réalisés ces dernières années; par exemple, en 2010 le Bangladesh a reçu le prix de l’Objectif du Millénaire pour le développement (OMD) pour avoir réduit la mortalité infantile (36). Mais Ferdausi Qadri, porte-parole de l’ICDDR,B sur l’essai du vaccin du choléra, est inconscient de ces développements, et elle voit la vaccination comme la seule voie de salut (32).

Les protestations contre les essais de vaccins oraux contre le choléra ne sont rien de nouveau, surtout quand l’une des personnes clé est John Clemens de l’International Vaccine Institute de Corée du Sud. En fait, partout où John Clemens avait été impliqué dans les essais de vaccins du choléra, au Bangladesh ou au Mozambique, des manifestations de masse avaient eu lieu (6, 37).

Comme au Bangladesh, le peuple du Mozambique a également protesté d’avoir être traité comme des animaux-sujets de laboratoire.

Conclusions:

ICDDR,B a exagéré les cas de choléra au Bangladesh afin de promouvoir un vaccin avec une mauvaise efficacité protectrice et produite par une entreprise française qui veut aboutir à conquérir le marché mondial des vaccins du choléra.

Il y a vingt-six ans, l’ICDDR,B menait également un essai sur un autre vaccin oral contre le choléra qui a bénéficié les fabricants de vaccins européens au marché de vaccin très coûteux de choléra pour les touristes riches des pays développés. Tant les bailleurs de fonds de ce procès ainsi que les receveurs pauvres du vaccin au Bangladesh ont été trompés.

Le choléra n’est pas un problème majeur de la santé au Bangladesh, et le vaccin inneficace Shanchol espacé de deux doses n’est la réponse. Les gens peuvent contracter le choléra durant la période de l’intervalle entre les deux doses.

Le choléra est une maladie facilement traitable qui peut être efficacement guérie par des thérapie de réhydratation (liquides par voie orale ou intraveineuse) et si nécessaire, par des antibiotiques. A présent l’assainissement, et non pas la vaccination, est la clé de la lutte contre le choléra. Les membres du Comité national du Bangladesh du Mouvement des droits de la Santé ont indiqué cela bien fortement et clairement à la conférence de presse à Dacca, le 14 mai 2011.

L’organisation Bill et Melinda Gates Foundation qui finance ce procès devrait écouter l’opinion de ces experts.

Comme le même groupe de chercheurs est à l’origine de l’essai du nouveau vaccin anticholérique qui était derrière le procès très controversé de 1985, il est absolument nécessaire que les résultats des essais soivent surveillés par des observateurs impartiaux, sans conflits d’intérêts. Sinon les résultats du procès ne seront pas crédibles.

Des scientifiques associés au Shanchol ont caché des informations sur la composition et le coût du vaccin. Ils ont également propagé des informations sélectives sur l’efficacité du vaccin. Ces pratiques vont contre les directives universellement acceptées sur l’intégrité scientifique et décrites par l’ORI du gouvernement américain. L’Organisation Bill et Melinda Gates, qui finance ce procès, doit veiller à ce que les principes de l’ORI soivent strictement suivies par les scientifiques associés à l’essai.

———-
Références

  • 1. Agence France-Presse. Bangladesh to hold massive cholera vaccine trial. February 16, 2011.
  • 2. Lancet. 2009; 374(9702):1694-702.
  • 3. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2011 April; 5(4): e999.
  • 4. J Health Popul Nutr. 2011 Feb;29(1):1-8.
  • 5. Vaccine. 2006; 24:4297-303.
  • 6. Mazhar F. 1996. Women and children of Bangladesh as experimental animals. Dhaka (ISBN No. 984-467-050-0).
  • 7. Lancet. 1986; 2(8499):124-7.
  • 8. Lancet. 1986; 2(8499):124-7.
  • 9. J Infect Dis. 1988; 158:60-9.
  • 10. Lancet. 1988; 1(8599): 1375-79.
  • 11. DUKORAL: Resevacciner fran SBL Vaccin (Travel vaccines from SBL Vaccin), 105 21 Stockholm, Sweden. 1996.
  • 12. Sadiq A. Marketing of the Oral Cholera Vaccine Dukoral using Misleading Information and the Exploitation of Women and Children of Bangladesh as Experimental Animals. News from Bangladesh. January 24, 2011.
  • (http://bangladesh-web.com/view.php?hidRecord=346593)
  • 13. The Internet press release, Active Biotech/SBL Vaccin AB, June 29, 1998.
  • 14. A Radomized Controlled Trial of the Bivalent Killed Whole Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine in Eastern Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Protocol/Version Number C-8-Pill version 3.0 Section 6.1 Study agents (Vaccine and placebo)
  • 15. WHO. 2006. Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine safety , Thiomersal and vaccines: questions and answers. http://www.who.int/vaccine_safety/topics/thiomersal/questions/en/
  • 16. WHO Expert Committee on Biological standardization, Technical Report Series No 2004; 924: 1-232.
  • 17. http://budhbar.com/?p=4490
  • 18. Cholera vaccines, Weekly Epidemiological Report, No 13, 2010, 85, 117-128.
  • 19. Office of Research Integrity. US Department of Health and Human Services. Avoiding plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices: A guide to ethical writing. http://ori.hhs.gov/education/products/plagiarism/1.shtml
  • 20. Business Daily, The Hindu Group of Publications, April 27, 2009.
  • 21. Eeckels R. Brief account of the major allegations in the press against ICDDR,B. The Dhaka Courier, August 29, 1986.
  • 22. The Daily Star (Dhaka): Local scientists develop diarrhoea vaccine, April 13, 2007
  • 23. The New Nation (Dhaka): Breakthrough in medical science: Diarrhoea vaccine Dukoral launched-Bangladeshi scientists have developed a vaccine that has been proven to be effective in preventing diarrhoea; April 13, 2007.
  • 24. http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/SAGE_cholera_overview_slides_10-28-09_Jon_Abramson.pdf
  • 25. Godlee F. 2010. Conflicts of interest and pandemic flu. 2010 Jun 3;340:c2947.
  • 26. Cohen D, Carter P. WHO and the pandemic flu ‘conspiracies’ BMJ 2010;340:c2912.
  • 27. Jefferson T, Doshi P. WHO and pandemic flu. Time for change, BMJ. 340: c3461.
  • 28. PACE Health Committee denounces ‘unjustified scare’ of Swine Flu, waste of public money. Press release # 455 (2010) http://www.coe.int/document-library/default.asp?urlwcd=https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=1631637
  • 29. Haider, R. Racketeering in the World Health Organization’s Cholera Vaccination Programme: Evil forces channel public funds into private pockets. News From Bangladesh, August 6, 2009 (http://www.bangladesh-web.com/view.php?hidDate=2009-08- 10&hidType=OPT)
  • 30. Prothom Alo, Dhaka. February 18, 2011
  • 31. Ahmed Sadiq. The cholera vaccine trial of ICDDR,B should be monitored by impartial observers. News from Bangladesh. March 10, 2011
  • 32. Nurul Islam Hasib. BDnews24. Govt Raises False Alarm http://dhaka.bdnews24.com/details.php?id=194498&cid=13
  • 33. Health Rights Movement Bangladesh, Press Conference on cholera vaccination
  • 14 May, 2011 http://bdnews24.com/pdetails.php?id=201263
  • 34. Minister under attack over cholera comments. New Age. May 15, 2011
  • http://newagebd.com/newspaper1/frontpage/18746.html?print
  • 35. Transparency in vaccine trial advised. BDNews24. July 19, 2011 http://bdnews24.com/pdetails.php?id=201263
  • 36. The Millennium Development Goals: Where Bangladesh Stands? 2010. Source (www.dghs.gov.bd)
  • 37. Agencia de Informacao de Mocambique (Maputo) News, March 4, 2004.

—————————-

Origines: News from Bangladesh | Haiti Chery

© Copyright 2012. Ce matériel est disponible pour la réédition tant que les réimpressions auraient une copie verbatim de l’article complet, en respectant son intégrité. Réimpressions de cette traduction en français doivent citer Ahmed Sadiq, Dady Chery et Haïti Chery, et avoir également un «lien directe» à l’article.

 

 

Lire aussi:
Utilisations des enfants pauvres d’Haïti comme animaux-sujets pour les experiences avec des vaccins contre le choléra
Cholera Vaccines Unnecessary, Ineffective, Expensive, and Dangerous
Onze Mois Au Lieu de Trois Semaines Pour Montrer Que le Choléra en Haïti Provient Du Népal
Without Consent: How Drugs Companies Exploit Indian ‘Guinea Pigs’
WHO Pandemic Flu Advisers Paid by Roche, Glaxo, Investigations Find

Leave a Reply