ACTA Killed By 478 to 39 Vote in EU Parliament

acta_j_sm

 

ACTA killed: MEPs destroy treaty in final vote

By Staff
RT

ACTA has received a knockout blow from the European Parliament as the majority of MEPs voted in favor of rejecting the controversial trade agreement, which critics say would protect copyright at the expense of freedom of speech on the Internet.

MEPs voted overwhelmingly against ACTA, with 478 votes against and only 39 in favor of it. There were 146 abstentions.

Eva Joly (C) and members of the European Parliament hold placard reading "Hello democracy goodbye ACTA" as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012 (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin).

“In am proud to say that the highly controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will not come into force in the European Union,”

the Treaty’s rapporteur in the European Parliament, David Martin MEP, wrote on his blog after the session.

Martin recommended that Parliament reject the treaty as it would not effectively tackle online piracy.

The anti-ACTA mood was strong among MEPs during the session, with some members holding banners reading

“Hello democracy. Goodbye ACTA”.

The ACTA-killing vote came despite an attempt by supporters of the treaty to postpone the crucial vote at the Parliamentary plenary session on Wednesday. However, as Martin writes, MEPs

“were able to build a strong majority and defeated the call for a postponement.”

“This is a historic day in terms of European politics,” he wrote.

The European Parliament vote means that 22 European member states cannot ratify ACTA into their local sovereign law.

Earlier all five parliament committees reviewing ACTA voted in favor of rejecting the international treaty.

The European Parliament was supported by 2.8 million European citizens around the globe who signed a petition calling for MEPs to reject the agreement. Thousands of EU citizens lobbied for blocking ACTA in street demonstrations, e-mails to MEPs and calls to their offices.

“On July 4, Europe celebrates a day of independence from American special interests. Today, we stood up for our most basic rights against corporate giants, and won,”

Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party, wrote.

“This is a huge victory for the citizenship, for democracy and for freedom online. We worked very hard for the last four years to achieve this,”

Jeremy Zimmerman, a co-founder and spokesperson for civil advocacy group La Quadrature du Net, told RT.

­What’s next for ACTA?

In theory, ACTA could still come into force outside the EU, between the United States and a number of smaller states like Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea, where the treaty is widely supported.

ACTA was developed with the participation of a number of countries, including all those listed above and others since 2007. When the ramifications of the agreement came to wider public knowledge this year, a wave of protests hit several countries. The EU suspended the ratification of ACTA in February to reconsider it.

ACTA could still be revived in the EU if the European Commission, the bloc’s executive body, calls for the agreement’s implementation and wins a court decision over it.

However, non-EU countries will still be able to shape laws around the treaty’s mandates, but ACTA will be significantly reduced without Europe’s support.

ACTA “was wrong from the start”

says Martin, adding that they

“need to start again from scratch.”

The proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is aimed at protecting copyright over a wide range of industries.

ACTA would require signatory states to impose draconian restrictions on online privacy in the drive to eradicate content piracy and the sale of counterfeit branded goods through the internet.

The main focus of criticism was targeting the impact it would cause to internet freedom.

 

Source: RT

Related:
ACTA Not Yet International Law | French MEP Quits in Protest
ACTA Ratification Suspended in Poland
Act Up Against ACTA Saturday Feb 11th
Massive Worldwide Anti-ACTA Protests
Poland Government: We Were Wrong, We Will Not Ratify ACTA
ACTA Needs No Court Decision Before European Parliament Vote
Crucial ACTA Vote Kept Open and Honest, ACTA Soon to Depart
Final Vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA on July 4th

 

 

ACTA killed: MEPs destroy treaty in final vote

By Staff
RT

ACTA has received a knockout blow from the European Parliament as the majority of MEPs voted in favor of rejecting the controversial trade agreement, which critics say would protect copyright at the expense of freedom of speech on the Internet.

MEPs voted overwhelmingly against ACTA, with 478 votes against and only 39 in favor of it. There were 146 abstentions.

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

“In am proud to say that the highly controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will not come into force in the European Union,” the Treaty’s rapporteur in the European Parliament, David Martin MEP, wrote on his blog after the session.

Martin recommended that Parliament reject the treaty as it would not effectively tackle online piracy.

The anti-ACTA mood was strong among MEPs during the session, with some members holding banners reading “Hello democracy. Goodbye ACTA”.

The ACTA-killing vote came despite an attempt by supporters of the treaty to postpone the crucial vote at the Parliamentary plenary session on Wednesday. However, as Martin writes, MEPs “were able to build a strong majority and defeated the call for a postponement.”

“This is a historic day in terms of European politics,” he wrote. The European Parliament vote means that 22 European member states cannot ratify ACTA into their local sovereign law.

Earlier all five parliament committees reviewing ACTA voted in favor of rejecting the international treaty.

The European Parliament was supported by 2.8 million European citizens around the globe who signed a petition calling for MEPs to reject the agreement. Thousands of EU citizens lobbied for blocking ACTA in street demonstrations, e-mails to MEPs and calls to their offices.

“On July 4, Europe celebrates a day of independence from American special interests. Today, we stood up for our most basic rights against corporate giants, and won,” Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party , wrote.

“This is a huge victory for the citizenship, for democracy and for freedom online. We worked very hard for the last four years to achieve this,” Jeremy Zimmerman, a co-founder and spokesperson for civil advocacy group La Quadrature du Net, told RT.

­What’s next for ACTA?

In theory, ACTA could still come into force outside the EU, between the United States and a number of smaller states like Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea, where the treaty is widely supported.

ACTA was developed with the participation of a number of countries, including all those listed above and others since 2007. When the ramifications of the agreement came to wider public knowledge this year, a wave of protests hit several countries. The EU suspended the ratification of ACTA in February to reconsider it.

ACTA could still be revived in the EU if the European Commission, the bloc’s executive body, calls for the agreement’s implementation and wins a court decision over it.

However, non-EU countries will still be able to shape laws around the treaty’s mandates, but ACTA will be significantly reduced without Europe’s support.

ACTA “was wrong from the start” says Martin, adding that they “need to start again from scratch.”

The proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is aimed at protecting copyright over a wide range of industries.

ACTA would require signatory states to impose draconian restrictions on online privacy in the drive to eradicate content piracy and the sale of counterfeit branded goods through the internet.

The main focus of criticism was targeting the impact it would cause to internet freedom.

 

Source: RT

 

European lawmakers reject global anti-piracy deal

By Claire Davenport
Reuters

BRUSSELS, Wednesday July 4, 2012 – – The European Parliament rejected a global agreement against copyright theft on Wednesday, handing a victory to protesters who say the legislation would punish people for sharing films and music online.

The vote marked the culmination of a two-year battle between legislators who supported the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and it’s largely young, digitally savvy opponents.

Tens of thousands of activists held rallies across Europe in February to protest against the law, which they said would curb their freedom and allow officials to spy on their online activities. About 2.5 million signed a petition against ACTA.

European Parliament lawmakers voted against the agreement by 478 to 39 with 165 abstentions, meaning the proposed law will have to be renegotiated by the European Commission, the EU’s executive.

European Parliament President Martin Schulz said in a statement after the vote that legislators were not against intellectual property rights but that ACTA left too much room for abuses and raised

“concern about its impact on consumers’ privacy and civil liberties, on innovation and the free flow of information”.

ACTA took four years to negotiate and has already been signed by several of the European Union’s big trading partners, including the United States, Canada and Japan. Its rejection is likely to complicate free-trade talks, officials say.

One of the aims of the agreement was to stem the growing tide of illegal downloads and streaming of illegal copies of films and music online. It also calls on signatories to seize fake goods and punish gangs making and selling them.

In rejecting ACTA, the European Parliament has not only raised doubts about the agreement’s future – because to function well it will require global adherence – but also called into question a separate proposed EU law on enforcing copyright.

EU officials fear they will they will encounter similar resistance when they attempt to reform the outdated law, IPRED, later this year.

The existing copyright law was adopted in 2001, when slow Internet dial-up connections were not capable of the swift flow of file-sharing seen today.

“There are a lot of people who protested against ACTA who would be willing to protest against the EU’s IPRED,” Marietje Schaake, a Dutch member of the European Parliament said.

BACKLASH

“We don’t want reform of copyright to be stifled by a confrontational atmosphere between the public and the Commission.”

EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht said ahead of the vote, referring to concerns about future legislation: “A vote against ACTA will be a setback for the protection of our intellectual property rights around the world.”

The cost of web piracy to the European Union is difficult to estimate, because compiling such figures would require spying on people’s online habits. But record label lobbyists say a steady decline in revenues over the last decade is enough evidence.

Business groups said the ACTA rejection meant the European Union would be weakened in free trade negotiations with the United States, Canada and emerging markets that are relative newcomers to intellectual property.

“When the EU talks to China about intellectual property rights, they (China) will refer to the parliament’s rejection (of ACTA),” said Ilias Konteas, a senior adviser at BusinessEurope, an EU lobby group representing 20 million firms in 35 countries.

“I am afraid the unintended consequences have not been considered by members of the European Parliament.”

The European Commission admits it must learn from the backlash against ACTA before IPRED is published in September. The main problem with both laws can be boiled down to two words: commercial scale.

Since negotiations began behind closed doors in 2008, ACTA’s critics in the European Parliament said the agreement needed to distinguish between web users who downloaded illegal files for their own entertainment and those who sought to make a living from it. But that never happened.

In a paper on the proposals to update EU copyright law, obtained by Reuters, the Commission said the reform must define commercial scale “to make sure that professional counterfeiters rather than individual consumers are targeted”.

In February, the European Commission referred ACTA to Europe’s highest court, the Court of Justice, for a ruling over whether it breached freedom of speech. A decision could take up to a year.

(Editing by Rex Merrifield and Pravin Char)

ACTA killed: MEPs destroy treaty in final vote

By Staff
RT

ACTA has received a knockout blow from the European Parliament as the majority of MEPs voted in favor of rejecting the controversial trade agreement, which critics say would protect copyright at the expense of freedom of speech on the Internet.

MEPs voted overwhelmingly against ACTA, with 478 votes against and only 39 in favor of it. There were 146 abstentions.

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

“In am proud to say that the highly controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will not come into force in the European Union,” the Treaty’s rapporteur in the European Parliament, David Martin MEP, wrote on his blog after the session.

Martin recommended that Parliament reject the treaty as it would not effectively tackle online piracy.

The anti-ACTA mood was strong among MEPs during the session, with some members holding banners reading “Hello democracy. Goodbye ACTA”.

The ACTA-killing vote came despite an attempt by supporters of the treaty to postpone the crucial vote at the Parliamentary plenary session on Wednesday. However, as Martin writes, MEPs “were able to build a strong majority and defeated the call for a postponement.”

“This is a historic day in terms of European politics,” he wrote. The European Parliament vote means that 22 European member states cannot ratify ACTA into their local sovereign law.

Earlier all five parliament committees reviewing ACTA voted in favor of rejecting the international treaty.

The European Parliament was supported by 2.8 million European citizens around the globe who signed a petition calling for MEPs to reject the agreement. Thousands of EU citizens lobbied for blocking ACTA in street demonstrations, e-mails to MEPs and calls to their offices.

“On July 4, Europe celebrates a day of independence from American special interests. Today, we stood up for our most basic rights against corporate giants, and won,” Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party , wrote.

“This is a huge victory for the citizenship, for democracy and for freedom online. We worked very hard for the last four years to achieve this,” Jeremy Zimmerman, a co-founder and spokesperson for civil advocacy group La Quadrature du Net, told RT.

­What’s next for ACTA?

In theory, ACTA could still come into force outside the EU, between the United States and a number of smaller states like Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea, where the treaty is widely supported.

ACTA was developed with the participation of a number of countries, including all those listed above and others since 2007. When the ramifications of the agreement came to wider public knowledge this year, a wave of protests hit several countries. The EU suspended the ratification of ACTA in February to reconsider it.

ACTA could still be revived in the EU if the European Commission, the bloc’s executive body, calls for the agreement’s implementation and wins a court decision over it.

However, non-EU countries will still be able to shape laws around the treaty’s mandates, but ACTA will be significantly reduced without Europe’s support.

ACTA “was wrong from the start” says Martin, adding that they “need to start again from scratch.”

The proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is aimed at protecting copyright over a wide range of industries.

ACTA would require signatory states to impose draconian restrictions on online privacy in the drive to eradicate content piracy and the sale of counterfeit branded goods through the internet.

The main focus of criticism was targeting the impact it would cause to internet freedom.

 

Source: RT

 

European lawmakers reject global anti-piracy deal

By Claire Davenport
Reuters

BRUSSELS, Wednesday July 4, 2012 – – The European Parliament rejected a global agreement against copyright theft on Wednesday, handing a victory to protesters who say the legislation would punish people for sharing films and music online.

The vote marked the culmination of a two-year battle between legislators who supported the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and it’s largely young, digitally savvy opponents.

Tens of thousands of activists held rallies across Europe in February to protest against the law, which they said would curb their freedom and allow officials to spy on their online activities. About 2.5 million signed a petition against ACTA.

European Parliament lawmakers voted against the agreement by 478 to 39 with 165 abstentions, meaning the proposed law will have to be renegotiated by the European Commission, the EU’s executive.

European Parliament President Martin Schulz said in a statement after the vote that legislators were not against intellectual property rights but that ACTA left too much room for abuses and raised

“concern about its impact on consumers’ privacy and civil liberties, on innovation and the free flow of information”.

ACTA took four years to negotiate and has already been signed by several of the European Union’s big trading partners, including the United States, Canada and Japan. Its rejection is likely to complicate free-trade talks, officials say.

One of the aims of the agreement was to stem the growing tide of illegal downloads and streaming of illegal copies of films and music online. It also calls on signatories to seize fake goods and punish gangs making and selling them.

In rejecting ACTA, the European Parliament has not only raised doubts about the agreement’s future – because to function well it will require global adherence – but also called into question a separate proposed EU law on enforcing copyright.

EU officials fear they will they will encounter similar resistance when they attempt to reform the outdated law, IPRED, later this year.

The existing copyright law was adopted in 2001, when slow Internet dial-up connections were not capable of the swift flow of file-sharing seen today.

“There are a lot of people who protested against ACTA who would be willing to protest against the EU’s IPRED,” Marietje Schaake, a Dutch member of the European Parliament said.

BACKLASH

“We don’t want reform of copyright to be stifled by a confrontational atmosphere between the public and the Commission.”

EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht said ahead of the vote, referring to concerns about future legislation: “A vote against ACTA will be a setback for the protection of our intellectual property rights around the world.”

The cost of web piracy to the European Union is difficult to estimate, because compiling such figures would require spying on people’s online habits. But record label lobbyists say a steady decline in revenues over the last decade is enough evidence.

Business groups said the ACTA rejection meant the European Union would be weakened in free trade negotiations with the United States, Canada and emerging markets that are relative newcomers to intellectual property.

“When the EU talks to China about intellectual property rights, they (China) will refer to the parliament’s rejection (of ACTA),” said Ilias Konteas, a senior adviser at BusinessEurope, an EU lobby group representing 20 million firms in 35 countries.

“I am afraid the unintended consequences have not been considered by members of the European Parliament.”

The European Commission admits it must learn from the backlash against ACTA before IPRED is published in September. The main problem with both laws can be boiled down to two words: commercial scale.

Since negotiations began behind closed doors in 2008, ACTA’s critics in the European Parliament said the agreement needed to distinguish between web users who downloaded illegal files for their own entertainment and those who sought to make a living from it. But that never happened.

In a paper on the proposals to update EU copyright law, obtained by Reuters, the Commission said the reform must define commercial scale “to make sure that professional counterfeiters rather than individual consumers are targeted”.

In February, the European Commission referred ACTA to Europe’s highest court, the Court of Justice, for a ruling over whether it breached freedom of speech. A decision could take up to a year.

(Editing by Rex Merrifield and Pravin Char)

ACTA killed: MEPs destroy treaty in final vote

By Staff
RT

ACTA has received a knockout blow from the European Parliament as the majority of MEPs voted in favor of rejecting the controversial trade agreement, which critics say would protect copyright at the expense of freedom of speech on the Internet.

MEPs voted overwhelmingly against ACTA, with 478 votes against and only 39 in favor of it. There were 146 abstentions.

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

Members of the European Parliament hold placard reading “Hello democracy goodbye ACTA” as they take part in a vote on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on July 04, 2012. (AFP Photo/Frederick Florin)

“In am proud to say that the highly controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will not come into force in the European Union,” the Treaty’s rapporteur in the European Parliament, David Martin MEP, wrote on his blog after the session.

Martin recommended that Parliament reject the treaty as it would not effectively tackle online piracy.

The anti-ACTA mood was strong among MEPs during the session, with some members holding banners reading “Hello democracy. Goodbye ACTA”.

The ACTA-killing vote came despite an attempt by supporters of the treaty to postpone the crucial vote at the Parliamentary plenary session on Wednesday. However, as Martin writes, MEPs “were able to build a strong majority and defeated the call for a postponement.”

“This is a historic day in terms of European politics,” he wrote. The European Parliament vote means that 22 European member states cannot ratify ACTA into their local sovereign law.

Earlier all five parliament committees reviewing ACTA voted in favor of rejecting the international treaty.

The European Parliament was supported by 2.8 million European citizens around the globe who signed a petition calling for MEPs to reject the agreement. Thousands of EU citizens lobbied for blocking ACTA in street demonstrations, e-mails to MEPs and calls to their offices.

“On July 4, Europe celebrates a day of independence from American special interests. Today, we stood up for our most basic rights against corporate giants, and won,” Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party , wrote.

“This is a huge victory for the citizenship, for democracy and for freedom online. We worked very hard for the last four years to achieve this,” Jeremy Zimmerman, a co-founder and spokesperson for civil advocacy group La Quadrature du Net, told RT.

­What’s next for ACTA?

In theory, ACTA could still come into force outside the EU, between the United States and a number of smaller states like Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea, where the treaty is widely supported.

ACTA was developed with the participation of a number of countries, including all those listed above and others since 2007. When the ramifications of the agreement came to wider public knowledge this year, a wave of protests hit several countries. The EU suspended the ratification of ACTA in February to reconsider it.

ACTA could still be revived in the EU if the European Commission, the bloc’s executive body, calls for the agreement’s implementation and wins a court decision over it.

However, non-EU countries will still be able to shape laws around the treaty’s mandates, but ACTA will be significantly reduced without Europe’s support.

ACTA “was wrong from the start” says Martin, adding that they “need to start again from scratch.”

The proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is aimed at protecting copyright over a wide range of industries.

ACTA would require signatory states to impose draconian restrictions on online privacy in the drive to eradicate content piracy and the sale of counterfeit branded goods through the internet.

The main focus of criticism was targeting the impact it would cause to internet freedom.

 

Source: RT

 

European lawmakers reject global anti-piracy deal

By Claire Davenport
Reuters

BRUSSELS, Wednesday July 4, 2012 – – The European Parliament rejected a global agreement against copyright theft on Wednesday, handing a victory to protesters who say the legislation would punish people for sharing films and music online.

The vote marked the culmination of a two-year battle between legislators who supported the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and it’s largely young, digitally savvy opponents.

Tens of thousands of activists held rallies across Europe in February to protest against the law, which they said would curb their freedom and allow officials to spy on their online activities. About 2.5 million signed a petition against ACTA.

European Parliament lawmakers voted against the agreement by 478 to 39 with 165 abstentions, meaning the proposed law will have to be renegotiated by the European Commission, the EU’s executive.

European Parliament President Martin Schulz said in a statement after the vote that legislators were not against intellectual property rights but that ACTA left too much room for abuses and raised

“concern about its impact on consumers’ privacy and civil liberties, on innovation and the free flow of information”.

ACTA took four years to negotiate and has already been signed by several of the European Union’s big trading partners, including the United States, Canada and Japan. Its rejection is likely to complicate free-trade talks, officials say.

One of the aims of the agreement was to stem the growing tide of illegal downloads and streaming of illegal copies of films and music online. It also calls on signatories to seize fake goods and punish gangs making and selling them.

In rejecting ACTA, the European Parliament has not only raised doubts about the agreement’s future – because to function well it will require global adherence – but also called into question a separate proposed EU law on enforcing copyright.

EU officials fear they will they will encounter similar resistance when they attempt to reform the outdated law, IPRED, later this year.

The existing copyright law was adopted in 2001, when slow Internet dial-up connections were not capable of the swift flow of file-sharing seen today.

“There are a lot of people who protested against ACTA who would be willing to protest against the EU’s IPRED,” Marietje Schaake, a Dutch member of the European Parliament said.

BACKLASH

“We don’t want reform of copyright to be stifled by a confrontational atmosphere between the public and the Commission.”

EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht said ahead of the vote, referring to concerns about future legislation: “A vote against ACTA will be a setback for the protection of our intellectual property rights around the world.”

The cost of web piracy to the European Union is difficult to estimate, because compiling such figures would require spying on people’s online habits. But record label lobbyists say a steady decline in revenues over the last decade is enough evidence.

Business groups said the ACTA rejection meant the European Union would be weakened in free trade negotiations with the United States, Canada and emerging markets that are relative newcomers to intellectual property.

“When the EU talks to China about intellectual property rights, they (China) will refer to the parliament’s rejection (of ACTA),” said Ilias Konteas, a senior adviser at BusinessEurope, an EU lobby group representing 20 million firms in 35 countries.

“I am afraid the unintended consequences have not been considered by members of the European Parliament.”

The European Commission admits it must learn from the backlash against ACTA before IPRED is published in September. The main problem with both laws can be boiled down to two words: commercial scale.

Since negotiations began behind closed doors in 2008, ACTA’s critics in the European Parliament said the agreement needed to distinguish between web users who downloaded illegal files for their own entertainment and those who sought to make a living from it. But that never happened.

In a paper on the proposals to update EU copyright law, obtained by Reuters, the Commission said the reform must define commercial scale “to make sure that professional counterfeiters rather than individual consumers are targeted”.

In February, the European Commission referred ACTA to Europe’s highest court, the Court of Justice, for a ruling over whether it breached freedom of speech. A decision could take up to a year.

(Editing by Rex Merrifield and Pravin Char)

Leave a Reply