Dying by Degrees from Climate Change
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | News Junkie Post. The End Age for humanity is not a date known to man, but a point of no return from climate change. Are we there now, as the Hopi and Mayans have predicted? Is there time left to us and, if so, how long?

Scientists, and Squirrels, Regenerate a Plant — 30,000 Years on

Scrat

By Staff, AFP via Seed Daily | Haiti Chery. Scientists have managed to grow flowering plants from the flesh of the fruit associated with seeds retrieved from squirrel burrows now 20-40 metres (65 to 130 feet) deep and in layers with the bones of mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, bison, horse, deer, and other animals from the Late Pleistocene Age. The squirrels had dug the frozen ground to build these burrows about 30,000 years ago, as confirmed by radiocarbon dating of the fruits.

Climate Change Melting Polar Regions Faster Than Ever Before

By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.

On Ecology, Economy, and Human Health

By Sandra Steingraber, ORION. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age forty-four. I have uncles with colon cancer, prostate cancer, stromal cancer. My aunt died of the same kind of bladder cancer—transitional cell carcinoma—that I had. But here’s the punch line to my family story: I am adopted. By Sandra Steingraber, ORION. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age forty-four. I have uncles with colon cancer, prostate cancer, stromal cancer. My aunt died of the same kind of bladder cancer—transitional cell carcinoma—that I had. But here’s the punch line to my family story: I am adopted. By Sandra Steingraber, ORION. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age forty-four. I have uncles with colon cancer, prostate cancer, stromal cancer. My aunt died of the same kind of bladder cancer—transitional cell carcinoma—that I had. But here’s the punch line to my family story: I am adopted.