Antarctica’s Accelerating Melt: Massive Sea Level Rise in Decades
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | News Junkie Post. “With regard to climate change, again and again, exponential processes have been treated as if they would develop linearly, despite scientists knowing quite well that they would not…. The sea-level rise of 10 to 16 feet will come in decades, rather than 200 years. It will submerge essentially every port city in the world….”

Dying by Degrees from Climate Change
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | News Junkie Post. The End Age for humanity is not a date known to man, but a point of no return from climate change. Are we there now, as the Hopi and Mayans have predicted? Is there time left to us and, if so, how long?

The Pulse of Climate Change
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | News Junkie Post. The Haitian impression of being in the center of a world vortex could not be truer when it comes to climate change. As a result of carbon (mostly carbon dioxide and methane) emissions due burning of fossil fuels by industrialized countries, global sea levels have risen one inch over the last decade alone.

Hurricanes and Climate Change

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By Brenda Ekwurzel, Union of Concerned Scientists | NOAA | Haiti Chery. Scientific evidence links the destructive power of hurricanes to higher ocean temperatures driven by global warming. Expansion of the oceans due to warming, combined with the inflow of water from melting land ice, have raised global sea levels more than one inch over the last decade. In addition, the water vapor content of the atmosphere over the oceans has increased four percent since 1970.

Typhoon Gener, Climate Change Wreak Havoc in Philippines

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Editorial comment by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery | Staff, AFP via Yahoo!7 News | Elena L. Aben and Ellalyn B. De Vera, Manila Bulletin | Manuel Mogato, Rosemarie Francisco and Ed Lane, Reuters | By Staff, Sun Star | Rio Rose Ribaya, Reuters via Yahoo! | By Kim Arveen Patria, Yahoo! Large farming towns north of the capital Manila, as well as heavily populated coastal areas remain under waist-deep floods. Fierce winds and heavy rains from slow-moving Typhoon Gener (international codename Saola) have battered the country, killing at least 39 people and displacing about 200,000. UPDATE Aug 7: The typhoon left the Philippines on Friday Aug 3 but was immediately followed by tropical storm Haikui, which raised the number of casualties to more than 50 and of the displaced to more than 270,000 people. UPDATE Aug 16: New tropical storm Helen (international name Kai-Tak) kills 7 and causes yet more flooding and destruction.

Revisiting Population Growth: The Impact of Ecological Limits

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By Robert Engelman, Yale Environment 360. Demographers predict that the world population will climb to 10 billion later this century. Is this projected population reasonable, given the warming of the planet and the increasing pressures on supplies of food, water and life-sustaining ecosystems including pollinators?

Amplified Acceleration of Ice Loss from Antarctica to the Sea

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PRESS RELEASE, UT Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). A study examining nearly 40 years of satellite imagery has revealed that the floating ice shelves of a critical portion of West Antarctica are steadily losing their grip on adjacent bay walls, potentially amplifying an already accelerating loss of ice to the sea.

Rapid Changes to Global Water Cycle Imply Severer Floods, Droughts, Famines
Dady Chery

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By Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. An article by Paul Durak and colleagues in the Journal Science represents yet more confirmation that the effects of global warming are stronger than anticipated from scientific models. An intensification of water evaporation and precipitation over the Earth implies severe consequences for living things, including famines, floods, droughts, and general climate instability.

In Famatina, Water Is Worth Far More Than Gold | El agua vale más que el oro en Famatina | Famatina, onde a água vale mais do que o ouro

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By Marcela Valente, IPS | Periodismo Humano | TN Argentina | You Tube. Thousands in the northwest Argentina province of La Rioja are mobilizing to stop an open-cast gold mining project in the Nevados de Famatina, a snowy peak that is the semi-arid area’s sole source of drinking water. “We take turns [blocking the road to the mountain], and we’re going to hold our ground until the government and the company drop this project,” – Carina Diaz Moreno, teacher from Famatima. (English | Spanish | Portuguese | Includes music video)

No Time Left to Adapt to Melting Glaciers | Noroeste de Perú sin tiempo para adaptarse al deshielo glaciar

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By Stephen Leahy, IPS | Tierramerica. Glacier water from the Cordillera Blanca, vital to northwest Peru, is decreasing 20 years sooner than expected. “The decline is permanent. There is no going back.” – Glaciologist Michel Baraer. (English | Spanish)

Climate Change Blamed for Storms, Flooding, Drought

By Cathy Yamsuan and Kristine L. Alave, Philippine Daily Inquirer | Editorial comment by Dady Chery, Haiti Chery. Two months before the recent huge loss of lives, Filipinos were warned to guard against climate change by protecting forests and improving drainage, as if a forest could indefinitely hold back the rising sea levels and more violent storms caused by the climatic changes brought on by the carbon emissions from developed countries. DC

Interview of Doug Peacock | Protection Restored for Yellowstone Grizzlies

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By Roger Cohn and Doug Peacock, Yale Environment 360. “…if the bear can make it, I always assume maybe we’ve got a shot, too. The bear is equally important to me because it’s the one animal out there that can kill and eat you about any time it chooses to, even though it seldom does. And it just stands as an instant lesson in humility.” – Doug Peacock

Climate Change Melting Polar Regions Faster Than Ever Before

By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.By Steve Connor, The Independent. From the Arctic sea to the Antarctican ice shelves, the frozen “cryosphere” is showing the unequivocal signs of climate change.

340 Square Mile Iceberg Breaking Away From Antarctica

By Jonathan Amos, BBC | Patrick Lynch, NASA. The calving of a huge iceberg at Pine Island Glacier is being closely watched by scientists, who consider it to be the largest source of uncertainty in global sea-level rise projections. UPDATED Feb 2, 2012 with a newly released image.By Jonathan Amos, BBC | Patrick Lynch, NASA. The calving of a huge iceberg at Pine Island Glacier is being closely watched by scientists, who consider it to be the largest source of uncertainty in global sea-level rise projections.By Jonathan Amos, BBC | Patrick Lynch, NASA. The calving of a huge iceberg at Pine Island Glacier is being closely watched by scientists, who consider it to be the largest source of uncertainty in global sea-level rise projections.