Sweatshops: Stepping Stone or Dead End?Tremplin ou cul-de-sac?

D11_5_sweat3_sm

By Staff
Haiti Grassroots Watch

English | French

Haitian factory owner Charles H. Baker admits that by trying to attract manufacturers to Haiti with the lowest salary in the Americas, the country is engaged in a “race to the bottom,” but he insists that low-wage, low-skilled assembly industries are a “stepping stone” to more complex industrial development.

“It will last 10 to 15 years,”

Baker told Haiti Grassroots Watch.

“I count on it only as a stepping stone… It’s a step. We’re going up the stairs and it’s one of the steps.”

[For details see Anti-Union, Pro-“Race to the Bottom” – Story #2]

Dozens of countries – and indeed, Haiti, on and off for the past thirty years – have already walked the walk, climbing onto the bottom of the “race to the bottom” steps.

What was the outcome around the region?

A Central American assembly factory. Taken from a story called "What is fashion worth?"

Haiti Grassroots Watch (HGW) reviewed reports on the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Central America to see how those countries, economies and workers have done.

Resoundingly, the evidence on Free Trade Zone (FTZ) and low-wage assembly industries shows:

Economy – Little evidence of “linkages” with the rest of the economy.

Environment and Health – Assembly industry-led industrialization can have direct and indirect negative effects on the environment, and lax regulations or lax enforcement can mean that workers are exposed to hazardous materials.

Society – While the employment of women does yield some positive effects (economic autonomy, etc.), assembly industries can also have negative effects on families and society.

In her study, Canadian researcher Yasmine Shamsie noted that

“The literature on [Export Processing Zones] is voluminous but there are a few findings that stand out when considering Haiti. First, countries that applied the EPZ model relatively successfully (such as Mauritius and Costa Rica for instance) employed it as one pillar of a broader plan to diversify their economies. This means that the model on its own will yield hardly any beneficial results.”

What do the data say?

HGW cannot claim to have perused all of the literature, but a glance at some studies of countries similar to Haiti might shed some light….

Economy

In 2003, José G. Vargas Hernández of the University of Guadelajara looked at literature related to Central America where, during the 1990s at least,

“most of the maquiladoras [were] owned by Asian capital, mainly [South] Korean capital investors.”

The researcher concluded that

“[t]here is no evidence that maquiladora industry’s technological complexity has a direct impact both in economic development and generation of well remunerated employment.”

Vargas Hernández went on to discuss universal “non-observances of labor rights,” the fact that foreign investors can leave a host country on a moment’s notice, and the frequent failure of the sector to develop beyond simple low-skilled, and low-wage jobs.

“There is not a clear understanding about the role that this type of industry is playing in economic growth and national development,” the researcher wrote.

In an exhaustive 2008 literature review, two US-based professors concluded that even Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and the creation of high-tech assembly industry don’t necessarily produce “spillover” into the local economy. In Comparative Studies in Comparative International Development, Eva A. Paus and Kevin P. Gallagher looked at FDI in Mexico and Costa Rica.ii

For the latter, they found

“some positive spillovers from FDI through the training, education… [but] spillovers via backward linkages [to the rest of the economy] have been small.”

Hopes were very high for Mexico, which had an indigenous electronics and computer industries prior to the FDI boom. Rather than source parts in Mexico, however, the foreign companies got inputs wherever they were cheaper – usually from Asia.

“Under the Washington Consensus, governments in both countries had great faith in the power of liberalized markets to render economic stability and growth, and for FDI to generate technological and managerial spillovers,” the authors wrote.

“Our article contributes to the growing body of evidence that the Washington Consensus does not constitute a viable development strategy.”

Along the Mexican-US border, home to the maquiladora boom, especially following the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), income disparity is higher than at any other commercial border in the world, a 2007 article in the Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal reports. Minimum wage in Tijuana buys one-fifth what it did in the early 1980s, and

“67% of homes have dirt floors, and 52% of streets are unpaved,”

researcher Amelia Simpson wrote.

A demonstration in Honduras (Photo: War on Want).

Environment and Health

There are generally two types of environmental concerns associated with assembly industry plants – direct environmental damage due to waste, and indirect damage or effects, due to increased pressure on the water supply from both the industry and the typical population influx inspired by the hope of jobs.

Damage or benefits to the environment appear to be highly dependent on the ability of the host country to enforce laws and standards. Some studies claim that assembly industry factories are more careful about the environment because they know foreign consumers might boycott a polluting industry

A 2002 report on Mexico for the United Nations found that

“the maquiladora industry performs better than the non-maquiladora industry with respect to direct environmental externalities.”

The dark blue colour of the water currents around jeans factories in Tehuacan is the dangerous result of unregulated discharges.

The case of the blue jeans water run-off in the Mexican state of Puebla is by now well-known. In order to “fade” jeans, they are usually beaten or chemically treated. Tehuacán means “Valley of the Gods,” but reporters call it “Valley of the Jeans.”

A 2008 study from Ciencia y el Hombre journal in Veracruz reported blue dye run-off polluting rivers and irrigation ditches. Of equal or greater concern is the increased demand on water supply, Blanca Estela García y Julio A. Solís Fuentes wrote.

“Due to the intensive use of water, the water table is diminishing between 1 and 1.5 meters every year, at the same time the population is growing between 10,000 and 13,000 people per year.”

In some parts of Mexico, factories now buy “water rights” from local farmers in order to cover their needs, harming agriculture and driving up the cost of water. The 2002 study noted that:

The shortage of water, both in quantitative and qualitative terms, has already forced the industry to start to purchase water rights, temporarily or permanently, from surrounding agricultural water shareholders. These water rights are traded with high market prices. One example is Nissan’s automotive plant in Aguascalientes that purchased water rights required for its painting processes.

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has an environmental “side agreement” that calls for companies to clean up after themselves, but the 2007 Golden Gate article noted that the agreement is neither “enforceable” nor has it “brought adequate protections for workers or the environment.”

Surveys of Haitian factories attest to the lack of protections for workers from environmental hazards. Better Work Haiti found that almost all factories violated national and international laws and standards.

“Average non-compliance rates are high also for Worker Protection (93%), Chemicals and Hazardous Substances (89%) and Emergency Preparedness (82%).”

According to the April, 2011, report,

“factories initiated remediation efforts to improve the situation,”

but as noted in a previous story [Salaries in the “New” Haiti, Story #1], Better Work does not have enforcement powers.

Society

As the record in Haiti shows, the installation of assembly industries and FTZs can have dramatic effects on population movement. According to Simpson, in Mexico, the maquiladora industry

“triggered the largest migration since the 1960s.”

“Tijuana’s population increased more than sevenfold from 1960 to 2000,” she wrote.

Society is also impacted in another way. More than any other industry in poor countries, assembly plants employ women. In some countries, the workforce is up to 80 percent female, often young. Women are preferred because, according to Canadian researcher Yasmine Shamsie, quoting another researcher,

“they are cheaper to employ, less likely to unionize and have greater patience for the tedious, monotonous work employed in assembly operations.”

(In Haiti, the balance between women and men is more even. Women make up about 65 percent of the workforce.)

The impact on women can be both negative and positive. On the negative side, women are exposed to the toxic chemicals, injuries due to movement repetition and can develop respiratory illnesses. On the other hand, having an independent income – albeit insufficient – can be empowering.

Still, women are usually the primary caregivers for children. Writing about Mexico’s Cuidad Juarez in 2004 for the Houston Institute of Culture, Richard Vogel noted:

“Family life, the foundation of every community, has deteriorated under the influence of the maquiladoras. About half of the families that reside in the two and three room adobe houses in the working-class neighborhoods of Juárez are headed by single mothers, many of whom toil long hours in the maquiladoras for subsistence wages. The resulting stress on families has lead to chronic problems of poor health, family violence, and child labor exploitation. Children suffer the most. Because of the lack of child-care programs, kids are often left home alone all day and fall prey to the worst aspects of street culture, such as substance abuse and gang violence. Ciudad Juárez, by any measure of social progress, is moving backward rather than forward under the influence of the maquiladora industry.”

References
i. “Central America Maquiladoras And Their Impact On Economic Growth And Employment” in Economics and Finance Review 1(1): 1-14, March 2011.
ii. “Missing Links: Foreign Investment and Industrial Development in Costa Rica and Mexico,” Eva A. Paus and Kevin P. Gallagher,” Studies in Comparative International Development (2008) 43:53–80.

 

Source: Haiti Grassroots Watch

 

 

 Par le personel
Haiti Kale Je

anglais | français

Le manufacturier Charles H. Baker admet qu’en essayant d’attirer des manufacturiers en Haïti avec les salaires les plus bas en Amérique, le pays s’engage dans « une course vers le bas », mais il ajoute que l’industrie, qui offre des emplois mal rémunérés à des travailleurs peu spécialisés, est un « tremplin » vers un développement industriel plus avancé.

« Ça durera de dix à quinze ans »,

a-t-il dit à Ayiti Kale Je.

« Je compte là-dessus seulement en tant que tremplin… C’est une étape. Nous montons un escalier et nous sommes sur une des marches ».

[Pour plus de détails, voir Anti-syndicalisme, pro-« course vers le bas » – Article 2]

Des douzaines de pays – dont Haïti de façon intermittente depuis trente ans – ont déjà emprunté cette route et ont gravi les échelons de cette « course vers le bas ».

Qu’est ce qui a été gagné par la région?

Une usine d'assemblage en Amérique Centrale. Tiré d'une histoire intitulée « What is fashion worth? »

Ayiti Kale Je (AKJ) a analysé des rapports sur la République Dominicaine, le Mexique et l’Amérique Centrale pour comprendre comment ces pays, leur économie et leurs travailleurs s’en sont tirés.

Les preuves sur les zones franches (ZF) et les usines d’assemblage aux bas salaires démontrent que :

Dans l’économie : Il y a peu de preuves d’établissent de « liens » avec le reste de l’économie;

Dans les domaines de l’environnement et de la santé : l’industrialisation sur le modèle de la chaine de production peut avoir des effets négatifs directs et indirects sur l’environnement, et l’absence de règlements et de leur application peut avoir comme conséquence d’exposer les travailleurs à des substances dangereuses.

Pour la société : si l’embauche des femmes comporte des avantages (autonomie pécuniaire, etc.), l’industrie de l’assemblage peut aussi avoir des effets négatifs sur les familles et la société.

Dans son étude, la chercheuse canadienne Yasmine Shamsie a noté que :

« Il y a une abondance de documentation sur [les zones franches pour exportations], dont il ressort quelques points à propos d’Haïti. Premièrement, les pays qui ont connu un certain succès avec le modèle EZP (zones franches pour l’exportation), par exemple l’Île Maurice et le Costa Rica, y ont recouru comme pilier d’un plan plus vaste visant à diversifier leur économie. Ainsi, ce modèle, pris seul, n’entraine que peu de retombées ».

Et qu’en disent les données?

AKJ ne prétend pas avoir parcouru toute la documentation, mais une revue des quelques études portant sur des pays similaires à Haïti peut nous éclairer…

Économie

En 2003, José G. Vargas Hernández, de l’université de Guadalajara,i a analysé les publications sur l’Amérique Centrale, où, dans les années 1990 au moins,

« la plupart des maquiladoras [usines d’assemblage] [appartenaient] à des capitaux asiatiques, principalement des investisseurs coréens. »

Le chercheur concluait que rien ne prouvait que la complexité technologique des industries de « maquiladoras » avait un impact direct sur le développement économique ou sur la création d’emplois biens rémunérés.

Vargas Hernández poursuivait sur la tendance généralisée du non-respect des droits des travailleurs, le fait que les investisseurs étrangers peuvent quitter un pays hôte du jour au lendemain et que le secteur parvient rarement à développer autre chose que des emplois peu spécialisés et mal rémunérés.

Le chercheur écrivait

« On ne comprend pas clairement le rôle que joue ce type d’industrie dans la croissance économique et le développement national ».

En 2008, dans une analyse approfondie de la documentation sur le sujet, deux professeurs aux États-Unis concluaient que même l’investissement direct étranger (IDE) et la création d’usines d’assemblage de haute technologie n’ont pas nécessairement de retombées sur l’économie locale. Dans Comparative Studies in Comparative International Development (Études comparées sur le développement international), Eva A. Paus et Kevin P. Gallagherii ont analysé le IDE au Mexique et au Costa Rica. Pour ce dernier, ils ont trouvé à l’IDE des retombées positives via la formation, l’éducation… [mais] peu de retombées via les liens [au reste de l’économie]».

Les attentes étaient très élevées au Mexique, qui comptait déjà une industrie de l’électronique et de l’informatique indigène avant le boom des IDE. Par contre, au lieu de se procurer les pièces au Mexique, les compagnies étrangères achetaient les intrants là où ils étaient le moins cher, généralement en Asie.

« Sous le Consensus de Washington, les gouvernements des deux pays ont fondé leurs espoirs sur le potentiel des marchés libéralisés pour faire croitre et stabiliser leur économie, et sur les IDE pour engendrer des retombées technologiques et opérationnelles », écrivait l’auteur.

« Notre article s’ajoute aux preuves croissantes selon lesquelles le Consensus de Washington ne constitue pas une stratégie viable de développement. »

Le long de la frontière entre le Mexique et les États-Unis, là où les « maquiladoras » ont prospéré, surtout après l’Accord de libre-échange nord-américain (ALÉNA), les disparités de revenus sont plus élevées que le long d’autres frontières commerciales dans le monde, selon le Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal. À Tijuana, le pouvoir d’achat du salaire minimum est le cinquième de ce qu’il était au début des années 1980;

« 67 % des maisons ont des planchers de terre battue et 52 % des rues ne sont pas pavées, »

écrivait la chercheuse Amelia Simpson.

Une manifestation au Honduras (Photo: War on Want).

Environnement et santé

Les zones d’usines d’assemblage sont généralement associées à deux types de problèmes environnementaux – les dommages directs causés par les déchets industriels et les effets indirects découlant d’une plus grande consommation d’eau par les industries et les populations qu’elles attirent à la recherche d’un emploi.

Les effets, pervers ou bénéfiques, sur l’environnement semblent dépendre étroitement de la capacité d’un pays hôte à faire respecter ses lois et ses normes. Certaines études affirment que les usines de l’industrie d’assemblage sont plus soucieuses de l’environnement parce qu’elles savent que leurs marchés internationaux peuvent boycotter une industrie polluante.

Un rapport sur le Mexique, rédigé en 2002 pour l’ONU, affirmait que « l’industrie des « maquiladoras » obtient de meilleurs résultats que les autres industries en matière d’impacts environnementaux directs. »

La couleur bleu foncée des courants d'eau près des usines de jeans à Tehuacan est le résultat des rejets dangereux non réglementés.

Le cas du ruissèlement d’eau de teinture des jeans dans l’état mexicain de Puebla est maintenant bien connu. En général, pour « délaver » un jean, on le bat ou on le traite chimiquement. « Tehuacán » signifie « vallée des Dieux », mais les journalistes l’appellent la « vallée des jeans. »

Une étude de 2008 du journal Ciencia y el Hombre, de Veracruz rapportait un ruissèlement de teinture bleue qui polluait les rivières et les canaux d’irrigation. Mais la pression croissante sur l’alimentation en eau est un problème aussi grave, sinon pire, écrivaient Blanca Estela García et Julio A. Solís Fuentes.

« En raison d’un usage intensif de l’eau, la nappe phréatique diminue de 1 à 1,5 mètre par année, tandis que la population croit de 10 000 à 13 000 personnes par année », observaient-ils.

Dans certaines parties du Mexique, les usines achètent maintenant des « droits d’utilisation de l’eau » des fermiers locaux, afin de couvrir leurs besoins, ce qui affecte l’agriculture et qui fait monter le prix de l’eau. L’étude de 2002 notait que :

Le manque d’eau, en quantité et en qualité, a déjà forcé l’industrie à acheter des droits d’utilisation de l’eau, de façon temporaire ou permanente, des actionnaires locaux de l’eau prévue pour l’agriculture. Ces droits d’utilisation de l’eau se vendent au prix fort. Par exemple, l’usine d’automobiles Nissan à Aguascalientes a acheté les droits d’utilisation de l’eau nécessaire à ses processus de peinture.

L’Accord de libre commerce entre le Mexique, la Canada et les Etats-Unis (ALENA) comporte un « accord parallèle » sur l’environnement qui exige que les compagnies nettoient après leur passage, mais l’article du Golden Gate notait que cet accord n’a pas force de loi et qu’il ne

« fournit pas de protection adéquate aux travailleurs ou à l’environnement. »

Une étude des manufactures haïtiennes confirme ce manque de protection des travailleurs contre des dangers environnementaux. Better Work Haiti a découvert que la plupart des manufactures violaient les lois et les normes nationales et internationales.

« Les taux moyens de non-conformité sont également élevés en ce qui concerne la protection des travailleurs (93 %); les produits chimiques et substances dangereuses (89 %) et la préparation aux urgences (82 %). »

Selon le rapport d’avril 2011,

« les manufactures ont entamé des initiatives de remédiation [sic] pour améliorer la situation »,

mais comme on l’a écrit dans un article précédent [Les salaires dans la « nouvelle » Haïti, Article #1] Better Work n’a pas de pouvoirs coercitifs.

Société

Comme l’expérience en Haïti le démontre, l’arrivée d’usines d’assemblage et des zones franches peut avoir des effets dévastateurs sur le mouvement des populations. Selon Mme Simpson, au Mexique, l’industrie des « maquiladoras » a

« provoqué la plus grande migration depuis les années 1960 ».

« La population de Tijuana a plus que septuplé entre 1960 et 2000 », écrit-elle.

La société en a subit d’autres effets. Plus que toute autre industrie dans les pays pauvres, les usines d’assemblage embauchent des femmes. Dans certains pays, les femmes, souvent jeunes, constituent jusqu’à 80 pour cent de la main-d’œuvre. Selon Yasmine Shamsie, qui cite un autre chercheur, on préfère les femmes car

« elles coutent moins cher, elles sont moins susceptibles de se syndiquer et elles ont davantage de patience face au travail fastidieux et monotone des opérations d’assemblage ».

(En Haïti, le ratio homme-femme est plus équilibré. Les femmes constituent environ 65 % de la main-d’œuvre.)

L’impact sur les femmes peut être positif comme négatif. Parmi les aspects négatifs, les femmes sont exposées à des produits toxiques, se blessent à cause des mouvements répétitifs et peuvent développer des maladies respiratoires. Par contre, le fait d’avoir un revenu indépendant – même s’il est insuffisant – peut leur donner de l’autonomie.

Pourtant, les femmes ont généralement les enfants à charge. À propos de la ville de Juarez, au Mexique, Richard Vogel écrivait en 2004 pour le Houston Institute of Culture :

« La vie familiale, fondement de toute communauté, s’est détériorée sous l’influence des maquiladoras. Près de la moitié des familles vivant dans des maisons de deux ou trois pièces, dans les quartiers ouvriers de Juarez, ont à leur tête une mère célibataire, qui travaille souvent de longues heures dans les maquiladoras pour gagner un salaire de misère. Le stress qui en résulte mène à des problèmes chroniques de santé, de violence familiale et d’exploitation des enfants par le travail. Ce sont les enfants qui en souffrent le plus. Comme il n’y a pas de garderies, les enfants sont souvent laissés seuls à la maison, toute la journée, et tombent dans les pièges de la culture de la rue, de l’abus de drogues et de violence des gangs. En termes de progrès social, Ciudad Juarez régresse plutôt qu’elle n’avance, sous l’influence de l’industrie des maquiladoras ».

 

Origine: Haiti Kale Je (5eme de 7 articles)

 

Tremplin ou cul-de-sac?

Par le personel
Haiti Kale Je

Le manufacturier Charles H. Baker admet qu’en essayant d’attirer des manufacturiers en Haïti avec les salaires les plus bas en Amérique, le pays s’engage dans « une course vers le bas », mais il ajoute que l’industrie, qui offre des emplois mal rémunérés à des travailleurs peu spécialisés, est un « tremplin » vers un développement industriel plus avancé.

« Ça durera de dix à quinze ans »,

a-t-il dit à Ayiti Kale Je.

« Je compte là-dessus seulement en tant que tremplin… C’est une étape. Nous montons un escalier et nous sommes sur une des marches ».

[Pour plus de détails, voir Anti-syndicalisme, pro-« course vers le bas » – Article 2]

Des douzaines de pays – dont Haïti de façon intermittente depuis trente ans – ont déjà emprunté cette route et ont gravi les échelons de cette « course vers le bas ».

Qu’est ce qui a été gagné par la région?

Une usine d'assemblage en Amérique Centrale. Tiré d'une histoire intitulée « What is fashion worth? »

Ayiti Kale Je (AKJ) a analysé des rapports sur la République Dominicaine, le Mexique et l’Amérique Centrale pour comprendre comment ces pays, leur économie et leurs travailleurs s’en sont tirés.

Les preuves sur les zones franches (ZF) et les usines d’assemblage aux bas salaires démontrent que :

Dans l’économie : Il y a peu de preuves d’établissent de « liens » avec le reste de l’économie;

Dans les domaines de l’environnement et de la santé : l’industrialisation sur le modèle de la chaine de production peut avoir des effets négatifs directs et indirects sur l’environnement, et l’absence de règlements et de leur application peut avoir comme conséquence d’exposer les travailleurs à des substances dangereuses.

Pour la société : si l’embauche des femmes comporte des avantages (autonomie pécuniaire, etc.), l’industrie de l’assemblage peut aussi avoir des effets négatifs sur les familles et la société.

Dans son étude, la chercheuse canadienne Yasmine Shamsie a noté que :

« Il y a une abondance de documentation sur [les zones franches pour exportations], dont il ressort quelques points à propos d’Haïti. Premièrement, les pays qui ont connu un certain succès avec le modèle EZP (zones franches pour l’exportation), par exemple l’Île Maurice et le Costa Rica, y ont recouru comme pilier d’un plan plus vaste visant à diversifier leur économie. Ainsi, ce modèle, pris seul, n’entraine que peu de retombées ».

Et qu’en disent les données?

AKJ ne prétend pas avoir parcouru toute la documentation, mais une revue des quelques études portant sur des pays similaires à Haïti peut nous éclairer…

Économie

En 2003, José G. Vargas Hernández, de l’université de Guadalajara,i a analysé les publications sur l’Amérique Centrale, où, dans les années 1990 au moins,

« la plupart des maquiladoras [usines d’assemblage] [appartenaient] à des capitaux asiatiques, principalement des investisseurs coréens. »

Le chercheur concluait que rien ne prouvait que la complexité technologique des industries de « maquiladoras » avait un impact direct sur le développement économique ou sur la création d’emplois biens rémunérés.

Vargas Hernández poursuivait sur la tendance généralisée du non-respect des droits des travailleurs, le fait que les investisseurs étrangers peuvent quitter un pays hôte du jour au lendemain et que le secteur parvient rarement à développer autre chose que des emplois peu spécialisés et mal rémunérés.

Le chercheur écrivait

« On ne comprend pas clairement le rôle que joue ce type d’industrie dans la croissance économique et le développement national ».

En 2008, dans une analyse approfondie de la documentation sur le sujet, deux professeurs aux États-Unis concluaient que même l’investissement direct étranger (IDE) et la création d’usines d’assemblage de haute technologie n’ont pas nécessairement de retombées sur l’économie locale. Dans Comparative Studies in Comparative International Development (Études comparées sur le développement international), Eva A. Paus et Kevin P. Gallagherii ont analysé le IDE au Mexique et au Costa Rica. Pour ce dernier, ils ont trouvé à l’IDE des retombées positives via la formation, l’éducation… [mais] peu de retombées via les liens [au reste de l’économie]».

Les attentes étaient très élevées au Mexique, qui comptait déjà une industrie de l’électronique et de l’informatique indigène avant le boom des IDE. Par contre, au lieu de se procurer les pièces au Mexique, les compagnies étrangères achetaient les intrants là où ils étaient le moins cher, généralement en Asie.

« Sous le Consensus de Washington, les gouvernements des deux pays ont fondé leurs espoirs sur le potentiel des marchés libéralisés pour faire croitre et stabiliser leur économie, et sur les IDE pour engendrer des retombées technologiques et opérationnelles », écrivait l’auteur.

« Notre article s’ajoute aux preuves croissantes selon lesquelles le Consensus de Washington ne constitue pas une stratégie viable de développement. »

Le long de la frontière entre le Mexique et les États-Unis, là où les « maquiladoras » ont prospéré, surtout après l’Accord de libre-échange nord-américain (ALÉNA), les disparités de revenus sont plus élevées que le long d’autres frontières commerciales dans le monde, selon le Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal. À Tijuana, le pouvoir d’achat du salaire minimum est le cinquième de ce qu’il était au début des années 1980;

« 67 % des maisons ont des planchers de terre battue et 52 % des rues ne sont pas pavées, »

écrivait la chercheuse Amelia Simpson.

Une manifestation au Honduras (Photo: War on Want).

Environnement et santé

Les zones d’usines d’assemblage sont généralement associées à deux types de problèmes environnementaux – les dommages directs causés par les déchets industriels et les effets indirects découlant d’une plus grande consommation d’eau par les industries et les populations qu’elles attirent à la recherche d’un emploi.

Les effets, pervers ou bénéfiques, sur l’environnement semblent dépendre étroitement de la capacité d’un pays hôte à faire respecter ses lois et ses normes. Certaines études affirment que les usines de l’industrie d’assemblage sont plus soucieuses de l’environnement parce qu’elles savent que leurs marchés internationaux peuvent boycotter une industrie polluante.

Un rapport sur le Mexique, rédigé en 2002 pour l’ONU, affirmait que « l’industrie des « maquiladoras » obtient de meilleurs résultats que les autres industries en matière d’impacts environnementaux directs. »

Le cas du ruissèlement d’eau de teinture des jeans dans l’état mexicain de Puebla est maintenant bien connu. En général, pour « délaver » un jean, on le bat ou on le traite chimiquement. « Tehuacán » signifie « vallée des Dieux », mais les journalistes l’appellent la « vallée des jeans. »

Une étude de 2008 du journal Ciencia y el Hombre, de Veracruz rapportait un ruissèlement de teinture bleue qui polluait les rivières et les canaux d’irrigation. Mais la pression croissante sur l’alimentation en eau est un problème aussi grave, sinon pire, écrivaient Blanca Estela García et Julio A. Solís Fuentes.

« En raison d’un usage intensif de l’eau, la nappe phréatique diminue de 1 à 1,5 mètre par année, tandis que la population croit de 10 000 à 13 000 personnes par année », observaient-ils.

Dans certaines parties du Mexique, les usines achètent maintenant des « droits d’utilisation de l’eau » des fermiers locaux, afin de couvrir leurs besoins, ce qui affecte l’agriculture et qui fait monter le prix de l’eau. L’étude de 2002 notait que :

Le manque d’eau, en quantité et en qualité, a déjà forcé l’industrie à acheter des droits d’utilisation de l’eau, de façon temporaire ou permanente, des actionnaires locaux de l’eau prévue pour l’agriculture. Ces droits d’utilisation de l’eau se vendent au prix fort. Par exemple, l’usine d’automobiles Nissan à Aguascalientes a acheté les droits d’utilisation de l’eau nécessaire à ses processus de peinture.

L’Accord de libre commerce entre le Mexique, la Canada et les Etats-Unis (ALENA) comporte un « accord parallèle » sur l’environnement qui exige que les compagnies nettoient après leur passage, mais l’article du Golden Gate notait que cet accord n’a pas force de loi et qu’il ne

« fournit pas de protection adéquate aux travailleurs ou à l’environnement. »

Une étude des manufactures haïtiennes confirme ce manque de protection des travailleurs contre des dangers environnementaux. Better Work Haiti a découvert que la plupart des manufactures violaient les lois et les normes nationales et internationales.

« Les taux moyens de non-conformité sont également élevés en ce qui concerne la protection des travailleurs (93 %); les produits chimiques et substances dangereuses (89 %) et la préparation aux urgences (82 %). »

Selon le rapport d’avril 2011,

« les manufactures ont entamé des initiatives de remédiation [sic] pour améliorer la situation »,

mais comme on l’a écrit dans un article précédent [Les salaires dans la « nouvelle » Haïti, Article #1] Better Work n’a pas de pouvoirs coercitifs.

Société

Comme l’expérience en Haïti le démontre, l’arrivée d’usines d’assemblage et des zones franches peut avoir des effets dévastateurs sur le mouvement des populations. Selon Mme Simpson, au Mexique, l’industrie des « maquiladoras » a

« provoqué la plus grande migration depuis les années 1960 ».

« La population de Tijuana a plus que septuplé entre 1960 et 2000 », écrit-elle.

La société en a subit d’autres effets. Plus que toute autre industrie dans les pays pauvres, les usines d’assemblage embauchent des femmes. Dans certains pays, les femmes, souvent jeunes, constituent jusqu’à 80 pour cent de la main-d’œuvre. Selon Yasmine Shamsie, qui cite un autre chercheur, on préfère les femmes car

« elles coutent moins cher, elles sont moins susceptibles de se syndiquer et elles ont davantage de patience face au travail fastidieux et monotone des opérations d’assemblage ».

(En Haïti, le ratio homme-femme est plus équilibré. Les femmes constituent environ 65 % de la main-d’œuvre.)

L’impact sur les femmes peut être positif comme négatif. Parmi les aspects négatifs, les femmes sont exposées à des produits toxiques, se blessent à cause des mouvements répétitifs et peuvent développer des maladies respiratoires. Par contre, le fait d’avoir un revenu indépendant – même s’il est insuffisant – peut leur donner de l’autonomie.

Pourtant, les femmes ont généralement les enfants à charge. À propos de la ville de Juarez, au Mexique, Richard Vogel écrivait en 2004 pour le Houston Institute of Culture :

« La vie familiale, fondement de toute communauté, s’est détériorée sous l’influence des maquiladoras. Près de la moitié des familles vivant dans des maisons de deux ou trois pièces, dans les quartiers ouvriers de Juarez, ont à leur tête une mère célibataire, qui travaille souvent de longues heures dans les maquiladoras pour gagner un salaire de misère. Le stress qui en résulte mène à des problèmes chroniques de santé, de violence familiale et d’exploitation des enfants par le travail. Ce sont les enfants qui en souffrent le plus. Comme il n’y a pas de garderies, les enfants sont souvent laissés seuls à la maison, toute la journée, et tombent dans les pièges de la culture de la rue, de l’abus de drogues et de violence des gangs. En termes de progrès social, Ciudad Juarez régresse plutôt qu’elle n’avance, sous l’influence de l’industrie des maquiladoras ».

 

Origine: Haiti Kale Je (5eme de 7 articles)
http://haitigrassrootswatch.squarespace.com/11_5_fr

Leave a Reply